Amebix returns

Instead of indie rock dressed up as metal, it’s punk dressed up as indie rock with heavy metal influences.

Definitely better than any indie metal from the last 10+ years

Just for kicks and contrast, some early Amebix too:

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Adventures in radio

Shane Bugbee, who with his wive Amy conducted the “365 days at the wheel” that interviewed Averse Sefira in Texas, has posted 100 hours of his radio show “three ring radio” @ archive.org… here’s a link, search “three ring radio” for 100 shows including interviews with folks like tommy chong, king diamond, penn jillette, seka, andy kahn, isacc bonowitz, max cavalera, tempest storm, george petros, wes beech, Roger Miret, get boys, phil anselmo, Nicolas Claux, Dr. Helen Morrison, Timothy Wylie, PETER GILMORE and so much more.

If you like apocalyptic synthpop and dark neofolk, consider Aural Apocalypse. Their playlist looks like this:

Haus Arafna: Heart Beats Blood Flows
Johann Merrich: Energieumwandlung
Finger Painted Death: Mescaline
Forests and Communism: Verschwinden
The Tiroler Horn Section: Call 911
Osewoudt: Ogen van Stro
The Blue Hour: The Night is Windless
Theandria: The Evening Darkens Over
Ritual Front: On Mother Earth (На Сырой Земле)
Voice of Eye: The End of All Things
Apologist: Away (edit)
Lingua Fungi: God on a Raft of Serpents
Atomtrakt: Stunde Null
Barbarossa Umtrunk: Oberland Freikorps
Kriegsfall-U: Same Entities
Spirits in Ambiance: The Sheltering Sky

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The death metal Kiss covers album

I never was really all that into Kiss, mainly because everything they did someone else did first and in less of a grandiose, overblown style. But when death metal bands comb through the Kiss catalogue and selectively cover some of the more intense moments, I have to applaud it. Back in the middle 1990s there was a rumor of a Kiss covers album featuring Tampa bands including the two who are featured in this article. Then, probably as soon as a lawyer saw the plan, it evaporated. Does anyone know anything more?

Here are two of the surviving tracks that made it to individual albums:

Death – God of Thunder

Resurrection – War Machine

Others, hilarious but unrelated:

Death Angel – Cold Gin

Arch Enemey – The Oath

Goatlord – War Machine

Masacre – Strutter

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Disregard that; I suck cocks

This place has the best trolls on the internet. They make it entertaining. Much more so than the articles (oops). In fact, the reason we keep posting them is so the chaotic trolling continues. Penis!

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Matter/Form; Surface/Structure; Instance/Essence

I love cosmic music. When downtrodden 1970s Germany had to re-invent itself, it came up with this devotional, esoteric, futuristic, reverent and hopeful music.

Cluster – Zuckerzeit

This is one of those albums that gets pointed out to you by the sage music veteran in a corner at an impromptu house party. “Yeah, you like Tangerine Dream and Eno? Try this out. It’s the real deal. A big improvement over those.” So you get it from your record store or favorite blogspot, and throw it on the speakers, and listen. What will strike you quickly is how aesthetically powerful and diverse this is. Each song picks a different set of sounds, and as a result, stands apart from the others. How they did this with 1970s technology I will probably never know, but I can imagine it involved hours of painstaking work. You will not find this breadth of richness of experience and variety on a Tangerine Dream album, and Fripp/Eno loses its surface shine in comparison. For this reason alone, I can see why so many people swear by this album. For those who like mid-1990s ambient, you can hear how this album must have been a major influence on Aphex Twin and clearly was on Electric Company. The same zen for many different perspectives on the same object applies. However, all the effort went into the surface: melodic development is near non-existent, and song structures are linear or cyclic but embrace no particular narrative and go really nowhere. The result is a listening experience that’s all on the surface and misses the real point of music, which is composition: writing melodies and fitting them into songs that sound like the profound truth of some experience. “Zuckerzeit” doesn’t hold a candle to Tangerine Dream or Fripp/Eno in this regard. Those august composers can show the same view of many different experiences, while Cluster resort to many perspectives of what is essentially the same underlying experience.

Ash Ra Tempel – Inventions for Electric Guitar

This is another album favored by insiders. Unlike many of the more keyboard oriented sounds of the 1970s, this is pure guitar noise. Hazy, beautiful guitar noise in long sprawling compositions. At least a thousand notes get played on each, it seems, and the styles vary in a deep tapestry from fast and furious to slow and bluesy. You can see every part of the whole that is our modern world embedded in this album. Unfortunately, it’s also a surface treatment; these songs are wholly linear. Ash Ra Tempel have mastered the aesthetics of the cosmic bands and in fact best them in that regard, but have not plumbed the underlying composition. These songs use the right type of simple infective melody, both cheerful and slightly melancholic, and build intensity in the way way as a Tangerine Dream song with lots of chaotic noise harmonizing, but there’s nowhere to go. Songs gradually get more intense and then fade away. They resemble nothing, whether objects in reality or in the mind; their experience is evident from the first note and as the last falls, is fulfilled but without surprise and thus depth. At some point, it becomes clear that Ash Ra Tempel make these songs from a pastiche of influences taken to a new aesthetic extreme, but there may be no content, which is why this release falls short of the true cosmic bands.

Your local hipsters will not understand the points made in this article. Good — the Dunning-Kruger effect triumphs again.

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Beherit – At the Devil’s Studio 1990

This looks to be an interesting release. The story is that after 20 years, a tape is found of Nuclear Holocausto Vengeance and Sodomatic Slaughter going for broke on tracks from the first two albums… and it’s (as always) rawer, less controlled, more chaotic, and more evil. It seems to me that it’s a more controlled version of The Oath of Black Blood, while the band were still trying to be more dramatic like Venom/Sarcofago and before they discovered the detached, organic, withdrawn evil of the second album.

But it’s best you see for yourselves:

The Oath of Black Blood

Six Days with Sadistic Slayer

Order from Hell’s Headbangers here — to be released in June 2011.

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NWN’s Yosuke Konishi does a radio show

I can’t believe that, in a community of people who claim to be so tight and supportive, this hasn’t gotten more traction.

Nuclear War Now! Productions label head Yosuke Konishi logged on to KSFJ radio and recorded a six-hour live broadcast of his favorite metal tracks:

Playlist / Parts 1 ~ 2 ~ 3 ~ 4 ~ 5 ~ 6 ~ 7 ~ 8 ~ 9 ~ 10

Mostly old-school stuff with some new-underground additions.

For your convenience, here are all of the shows in a single archive (635mb, Megaupload) so that you can download them with one click and happily listen away.

I have to say that Yosuke K. did an excellent job with these shows. The purpose of radio, like sampler CDs or written reviews, is to expose an audience to contenders for quality and/or insightful music. By providing a contrast between samples, the DJ shows his audience what he has learned (as an expert in the subject) and allows them to make their own choices about where they fit into that vision. More information from the man himself in this forum topic.

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