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Listening to an album as a whole

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 04, 2010, 07:01:22 PM
Since I come from the old-school(ie. I'm old) it is unnatural for me to listen to albums any other way, though not all recordings lend themselves to the experience the same way, of course.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 05, 2010, 12:58:29 PM
I've been listening to metal (and all worthy music) this way since I bought a cassette of Ride the Lightening when I was ten years old.  Listening to an album as a whole, especially with headphones on in the dark, has greatly assisted me in separating the good from the bad.  It should be pretty obvious, even to the uninitiated,  that a Cradle of Filth album lacks substance if they were to focus the entirety of their attention on it for 72 consecutive, mind numbing minutes. If that person were to continue playing select, "kewl" songs from the album to their friends while getting drunk, they may remain under the delusion that Cradle of Filth is quality music for who knows how long.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 05, 2010, 05:03:11 PM
Unfortunately this is only half true, as there are hordes of idiots in metal who would be able to listen to a Cradle album in its entirety and connect with it. What are they connecting with? The same thing Lady Gaga and Coal Chamber connects to fans with.


Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 05, 2010, 07:34:43 PM
I have yet to come across an album I love all the songs on and that I could tolerate and be willing to devote the time towards listening to all the way through in one sitting, except maybe for Ulver's Bergtatt album.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 06, 2010, 12:25:25 PM
Mortifera - Maledictiih
Stormnatt - The Crimson Sacrament
Endezzma - Alone
Black Sin - Light of despair

are some recent releases I like to listen to without need to skip tracks.


Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 06, 2010, 12:54:42 PM
Like I said, if I have to get skip happy with some albums I'll just stop listening to them, but that said, sometimes an album's message is better received if some of the tracks are left out. This is especially true with extremely intense death metal like early Deicide and Cryptopsy.

None So Vile has several skip worthy tracks. I'm never not in the mood for Dead and Dripping, Crown of Horns or Phobophile but Benedictine Convulsions has its time and place.

The first Deicide and even Legion has some skippers. Lunatic of God's Creation, and Satan Spawn are not the best ways they could have started those albums. Fuck it, should have started them both with Suicide Sacrifice. Satan.

Reign in Blood and even South of Heaven have some mandatory skippers. Behind the Crooked Cross is the worst Slayer song ever.


The infamous Teacher's Pet on Black Metal is a major skipper. I've retconned that song out of that album entirely.

And unfortunately the latter half of Blessed are the Sick is really hurt by being inconsistent and disjointed compared to the first. I can never finish it. After the title track my heart sinks as the experience kind of ends there. Altars of Madness has no required skippers. That is what evens the albums out in terms of their value to me.

All classic Metallica albums have serious skip requirements. Especially after Kill em All. Honestly the next three albums have one long album of absolute classics strung between the "Escapes", "Leper Messiahs" and "Eye of the Beholders".

Paranoid, Master of Reality and Vol 4 have no skippers, while the other three albums of the first 6(66) albums are cut-and-paste-playlist types.

Most metalish or neoclassical prog rock from the 70s has songs you have to skip that are too rooted in older rock styles. One notable exception is Captain Beyond's first album. Such a classic. Metal before metal realized it was metal. That in essence makes it [/i]more metal.[/i]

I absolutely am enchanted by the most recent Pagan Altar album, but there are a few on this album I usually find myself passing by, where as on their debut I don't find myself doing that nearly as often.

Pentagram is another classic band with classic songs that often didn't get it right for an entire album. A common problem for more rock-based styles and acts.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 06, 2010, 01:00:10 PM
I've come to realize, just now, the true nature of Cannibal Corpse. They are a theoretical good band that produced entire albums of skipworthy tracks. You put on an album, think, "ok..this is alright...but let's see what else is on this record...". In three and a half minutes you're at the last track and begging for Immortal Rites.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 06, 2010, 01:24:25 PM
Like I said, if I have to get skip happy with some albums I'll just stop listening to them, but that said, sometimes an album's message is better received if some of the tracks are left out. This is especially true with extremely intense death metal like early Deicide and Cryptopsy.

None So Vile has several skip worthy tracks. I'm never not in the mood for Dead and Dripping, Crown of Horns or Phobophile but Benedictine Convulsions has its time and place.

The first Deicide and even Legion has some skippers. Lunatic of God's Creation, and Satan Spawn are not the best ways they could have started those albums. Fuck it, should have started them both with Suicide Sacrifice. Satan.

And unfortunately the latter half of Blessed are the Sick is really hurt by being inconsistent and disjointed compared to the first. I can never finish it. After the title track my heart sinks as the experience kind of ends there. Altars of Madness has no required skippers. That is what evens the albums out in terms of their value to me.

All classic Metallica albums have serious skip requirements. Especially after Kill em All. Honestly the next three albums have one long album of absolute classics strung between the "Escapes", "Leper Messiahs" and "Eye of the Beholders".

Paranoid, Master of Reality and Vol 4 have no skippers, while the other three albums of the first 6(66) albums are cut-and-paste-playlist types.
You have a bizarre sense of taste. "Benedictine Convulsions" and "Satan Spawn" are two of the best tracks on each of their respective albums.

Other than that, you make several good points. I feel that all of Voivod's noteworthy albums are hit-and-miss affairs.

Evil seed, injected!
October 06, 2010, 05:36:31 PM
Satan Spawn actually is a great track in of itself, but for whatever reason I just don't think it was the best way to start the album with. But Legion is perhaps my most-listened-album ever, so I could concede that I might pick apart whatever the first song would be since naturally it is one of my most listened singular songs ever. But I was unclear there, and made it seem like I don't like that song. In actuality, every song on Legion is perfect for what the album says. Wipe away this world of unworth. Decapitation, satanic rebirth.

Come to think of it, before Legion infested my soul, None So Vile was my standard as best Death Metal ever, so again, I've listened to much that I've come to anticipate every note on every song. Which comes back to my original point, once I start "not feeling like" a song or two too many on an album, no matter how good, I stop playing them as much. Once you "get sick" of an album you start to get annoyed by songs you otherwise especially like. Both albums have sat on the shelf for me a little bit, down from(multiple) daily listens to once every few months, so recently I've been able to experience them both in their entirety without the need to press any buttons, much more often. The same I could also probably say about the first Morbid Angel, but I never skipped anything there with regularity, just shelved it.

However Blessed will always have skippers, no matter the mood I am in.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 06, 2010, 07:51:56 PM
Other than that, you make several good points. I feel that all of Voivod's noteworthy albums are hit-and-miss affairs.

Got to disagree with that. Killing Technology, Dimension Hatross, and to a lesser extent Nothingface are frighteningly consistent. The best speed metal has to offer.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 07, 2010, 04:24:02 AM
There are only a few metal albums that are genuinely through-composed, these are the ones that you won't understand without hearing the whole album.  Off the top of my head I can think of these...

Burzum - Hvis Lyset Tar Oss (This is the most important)

Morbid Angel - Blessed are the Sick
Incantation - Onward to Golgotha
Gorguts - Obscura

Apart from that most albums are disparate enough that you can grasp their significance from just a few songs, having said that I still prefer hearing complete works.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 07, 2010, 04:58:26 AM
Morbid Angel - Blessed are the Sick


Maybe half of it anyway. The album is a mixture of the band as they were in 1991 and some throw aways that didn't make Altars but had existed in various forms since the middle part of the last decade. The interludes do a lot to unify it but song placement, especially as the album winds down, is incidental. The album's high points date it low points very badly to my ears. Like DMDS being five songs shorter and using rerecorded Deathcrush songs to fill in the gaps.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 07, 2010, 08:19:56 AM
Other than that, you make several good points. I feel that all of Voivod's noteworthy albums are hit-and-miss affairs.

Got to disagree with that. Killing Technology, Dimension Hatross, and to a lesser extent Nothingface are frighteningly consistent. The best speed metal has to offer.

Killing Technology is probably the last Voivod album I can tolerate. The rest just sounds like pop/rock in a speed metal shell.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 10, 2010, 04:45:53 PM
I feel Transylvanian Hunger was always meant to be listened to as a whole.  I get that impression when I hear them them about it.  They make it a point to mention that the rhythm never changes drastically until the 6th track.  I feel they were going for an experience, rather than just recording once they had enough songs to fill it up.

Re: Listening to an album as a whole
October 12, 2010, 09:55:21 AM
I feel the same way about the obscura album "Cosmogenesis".It has that story like feel to it, Same thing with Gojiras "From Mars To Sirius". The way that all of the songs go together, and seem to flow one right into the next. I love it when an album can do this.