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How Christianity’s Subversion of Kin Selective Altruism Evolved into the Modern

Re: Man leaves behind 1905-page suicide note
October 04, 2010, 02:14:28 PM
Please, that would be good. I'm not really following you, to be honest. I really don't see just HOW this is a case of relativism. Request for further elaboration.

It is a case of relativism because he stated that there is no rational basis for choosing between various views.  This implies that the basis for choosing beliefs is entirely relative to the perspective of the individual.  If, however, there is a rational basis between choosing views, then the choice can exist entirely independent from the perspective of the individual.  By asserting that no rational can be used to justify a position on the subject of whether or not to live, he necessarily fell into the line of thinking that he could arbitrarily decide which position was superior.  He then fell into fatalism and death, probably because he was depressed (maybe he was a closet pedo?).  Had he taken the time to speak with someone else, they could have offered any number of rational reasons for him to not commit suicide.

Re: Man leaves behind 1905-page suicide note
October 05, 2010, 09:48:13 PM
Had he taken the time to speak with someone else, they could have offered any number of rational reasons for him to not commit suicide.

Like what?


Re: Man leaves behind 1905-page suicide note
October 05, 2010, 09:55:04 PM
Why? Decision:

  • Ride the Tiger
  • lickspittle
  • suicide

Re: Man leaves behind 1905-page suicide note
October 06, 2010, 02:43:24 AM
Could you clarify what you mean by this? I'd say he is correct in asserting that there is no rational basis for choosing, some are just preferential to others.

If your preferences are for rationally based choices, then you can easily see how one can rationally choose.

A more complete answer would be that once you realize that no intrinsic value exists, it is only posited by people, you can look at the world from a purely logical perspective.  Certain values are preferential to others because they have properties that allow for the continuation of the natural processes that bring forth life and the higher goals that creatures like us can achieve.  The only objection to this could be the proposition that you hate natural processes and their products and therefore hate yourself.  If you hate yourself, then killing yourself would make sense.  Otherwise, it would be a wholly irrational choice.  If you find this answer unsatisfactory, I may be able to elaborate more.

I wouldn't say he necessarily hated life. It is possible he neither valued neither the continuation nor cessation of (his) life, as neither one is a choice based on reason. An extreme case of relativism / fatalism to be sure, but I don't see a flaw in his logic. 
The fact that he did make a choice to value logic over irrationality is an interesting notion though, I hadn't thought of that.

Re: Man leaves behind 1905-page suicide note
October 06, 2010, 02:51:39 AM
Nothing matters, so I'm going to go compose a set of symphonies to express just how much nothing matters, and then chop off my limbs.

Re: Man leaves behind 1905-page suicide note
October 06, 2010, 06:00:21 AM
Nothing matters, so I'm going to go compose a set of symphonies to express just how much nothing matters, and then chop off my limbs.

If you are positing so base and lazily what I think you are, I will say that I think Heisman wanted to elucidate his thoughts and ideas before he commit suicide, and that it would have made him happy to have completed such an important project.

But that doesn't matter, because all options are equal, right?

Has anyone had a look through this guy's writings? Much/any worthwhile material?