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Poor poetry in metal

Poor poetry in metal
June 06, 2006, 02:13:51 PM
Although often rich in creative visionary substance, bad poetic form in Hessian music remains. Rather than belaboring in useless, untermenschean argument against forms and methods, let us explore possible artistic growth in new, classical, romanticist directions.

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The unit that is repeated to give steady rhythm to a poem is called a poetic foot; in English it usually consists of accented and unaccented syllables in one of five fairly simple patterns:


iambic
trochaic
anapestic
dactylic
spondaic

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We also count the number of feet in each line, or, formally, verse (from Latin versus, which means one "row" of metrical feet). Verse lengths are conventionally described in terms derived from the Greek:


1 monometer
2 dimeter
3 trimeter
4 tetrameter
5 pentameter
6 hexameter
7 heptameter

Abrams, M.H., The Norton anthology of English literature. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1996

Cover art http://www.wga.hu/art/m/martin/bard.jpg

euronymous

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 06, 2006, 02:16:47 PM
fuck poetry, if I'd look for poetry in words,  I'd pick a book.

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 06, 2006, 02:26:17 PM
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fuck poetry, if I'd look for poetry in words, †O'd pick a book.


Everybody tells me that! Eee! I hate it! But I guess it's probably true for most music-oriented people.

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 06, 2006, 02:28:15 PM
Fuck the democracy voting. New growth or extinction.

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 07, 2006, 10:04:37 PM
I side with Euronymous.  Also the title "poetry in metal" sounds pretty rediculous, sometimes I feel that people take things a bit too seriously around here.

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 07, 2006, 10:45:18 PM
We have run out of corners in this classroom due to an excess of dunces. Metal lyrics are typically malformed poetry. It's as cool and alternative as a retarded child smearing crap on itself is cool and alternative. There is room in this for superior growth, but it seems the crowd will revolt as usual.

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 07, 2006, 10:54:01 PM
Let's hear more about "too much effort", "too hard to accomplish" and "I don't understand". Come on crowd, you've been doing it for two thousand years now. Why change?

euronymous

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 08, 2006, 03:18:38 AM
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We have run out of corners in this classroom due to an excess of dunces. Metal lyrics are typically malformed poetry. It's as cool and alternative as a retarded child smearing crap on itself is cool and alternative. There is room in this for superior growth, but it seems the crowd will revolt as usual.



A superior growth includes ppl like you liking poetry in norwegian?

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 08, 2006, 07:01:13 AM
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We have run out of corners in this classroom due to an excess of dunces. Metal lyrics are typically malformed poetry. It's as cool and alternative as a retarded child smearing crap on itself is cool and alternative. There is room in this for superior growth, but it seems the crowd will revolt as usual.


I fail to see how your first post is aiming to achieving anything non-crowd or useful or anything much at all. Perhaps we should start again at the beginning?

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 08, 2006, 09:40:09 AM
I wonder if you can think of (proto-)examples in metal music which demonstrate the effect of such a composition?

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 08, 2006, 03:50:24 PM
The syllabic rhythm would be destroyed if such metal was translated into other than its original language. In some ways, metal would become less multicultural friendly, more localized. Metal can become a legitimate high art, rather than tending toward entertainment, following some long established guidelines. The academic secular Christians and educated religious Christians would be forced to grudgingly admit this fact. The instrumentals would come into a new dynamic with this more complex syllabic rhythm in the lyrics. Also, not all metal needs to have lyrics, so infinite room for creative instrumentals remains.

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 08, 2006, 05:31:48 PM
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.Metal can become a legitimate high art, rather than tending toward entertainment, following some long established guidelines. The academic secular Christians and educated religious Christians would be forced to grudgingly admit this fact.

Could you explain why do you think there is a need for metal to be considered high art by secular Christians?
As for using the poetic rhythms in metal why donít you as an ‹bermensch go and do it instead of ushering the masses to do It.?


Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 09, 2006, 12:02:43 AM
Exceptional use of poetry in metal: Carcass

I enjoy their sick-yet-intelligent sense of humor in "Necroticism", where they go so far as to name their guitar solos, and "Heartwork", despite its departure from their tread path into the realm of speed metal, displays mastery of lyric as well as instruments. These fellows were no strangers to irony, nor classical literary forms for that matter!

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 09, 2006, 12:28:55 AM
It's a good idea but it's probably not going to happen, there are a few occasions where people have written metal songs to old poems (Icelandic lays and such) and it usually works well. But to actually write poetry like that would require extended study/practice which would go beyond the attention span of most people.

If metal is to grow and mature into a memorable genre (something that people in more then 50 years will listen to) this is just one of many ideas that should really be accepted.

Personally I think more emphasis should be put on proper use of motive-forms and correct song/album structuring before lyrics, but it's just my opinion.


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As for using the poetic rhythms in metal why donít you as an ‹bermensch go and do it instead of ushering the masses to do It.?



Yeah, why talk about anything, that's not what forums are for.  ::)

Re: Poor poetry in metal
June 09, 2006, 02:38:10 PM
More info: Pentameter

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P1.3. It is no accident that the following lines (and virtually thousands more in the corpus of English poetry) are all identical in one specific feature. Which?

I find no peace, and all my war is done (Wyatt, 1557)

One day I wrote her name upon the strand (Spenser, 1594)

That time of year thou mayst in me behold (Shakespeare, 1609)

Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part (Drayton, 1619)

And ten low words oft creep in one dull line (Pope, 1711)
Answer: These lines are all identical in length. Not length as measured by number of letters or number of words (as is misleadingly suggested by item five -- note that item three has nine words, not ten); no, it is the number of syllables: the lines are all exactly ten syllables long. And when one reads these lines (either mentally or out loud) one notices that they tend to break down into smaller groups of syllables.


http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppp.htm

I _
1 find /\
no _
2 peace /\
and _
3 all /\
my _
4 war /\
is _
5 done /\

Five syllabic "peaks" is pentameter. _/\_/\_/\_/\_/\

This should be easy for Hessians to understand. It is surprising that musicians are not more technically interested in this. The rhythm has some type of effect on the linguistic part of the brain (as I recollect from English lit.). The instruments might also play on this in some way.