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Tangerine Dream

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 01, 2015, 06:53:05 AM
Regarding metal, it could perhaps be said that doom metal (of the funeral variant) makes fairly extensive use of the technique, though it's not something I can listen to all that much. Whereas an album such as Filosofem by Burzum is more akin to ambient with occassional elements of 'drone'. Even the first two SWANS albums could fit that description quite well.

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 02, 2015, 01:30:24 PM
Thanks for the recommendations. I haven't heard any of those records, but I will indeed hear them out. When it comes to the metal stuff, I can hear the drone technique on Filosofem. I'm glad though that Burzum/Varg took another another route on the later ambient/keyboard albums.

By the way, how did you mean when you wrote that TD/Schulze discovered the technique in question by accident?

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 02, 2015, 02:11:50 PM
I've been trying to find the Coil album. Is it the one where they call themselves TIME MACHINES as well? It's from 1998.

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 03, 2015, 02:09:18 AM
I've been trying to find the Coil album. Is it the one where they call themselves TIME MACHINES as well? It's from 1998.

Yeah, that's the one. I think they used an alternate name because it was such a different project to the regular Coil material. I don't know if it has much baring on metal but it is at least held in some esteem by a select few. If you are familiar with Beherit at all, then it is worth noting that Marko later went on to start an ambient/drone project called Suuri Shamaani which is fantastic. Perhaps that project represents to something like Time Machines what Neptune Towers does to Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze.

By the way, how did you mean when you wrote that TD/Schulze discovered the technique in question by accident?

I suppose it isn't fair to say 'by accident', but that the 'drone' sound they momentarily stumbled upon was not really a major part of what they were trying to achieve with the rest of their works, nor was it an obvious direct influence on later artists working in this style. But there is actually much that could be extracted from these albums and used to great effect within modern incarnations of the genre (as a lot of it can get fairly bland and lifeless). For example, Klaus Schulze has this remarkable ability to steadily build up and maintain this sense of motion or momentum until it collapses under the sheer power and weight of itself. While Tangerine Dream - Zeit is more notable for the extreme sparseness and mysteriousness it conveys.

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 06, 2015, 09:10:49 AM
I saw that the Coil-album is now up in the audiofile section, thanks. I'm familiar with BEHERIT, especially Drawing Down The Moon and Electric Doom Synthesis, but not with the Shamaani stuff. I'll try to squeeze that one into my weekly playlist as well.

Regarding the accidental discovery of droning techniques, it seems like the pioneers of electronic ambient music had a high degree of inventivness when it came to trying out new techniques and ways of composition. Judging from the liner notes to TD's Virgin records they used a LOT of equipment, but when they couldn't get what they wanted out of existing musical tools, they created them themselves (atleast that's what I've gathered from the album sleeves) to suit their needs and visions.

Getting back to the original post (I wonder if the topic creator is still around, guess not). Listening to Phaedra in the last couple of weeks has just strenghtened my opinion that it isn't at all whimsical or easy listening. Like other ambient stuff from Brian Eno to this day, this kind of music fits the needs of different listeners (well, I couldn't think of another way to express this stance). If you are receptive to Phaedra, it WILL bring out all kinds of reactions/visions. It is absolutely obscure at some moments, but it is also evocative and majestic.
Arguments pro or against this stance are welcome!

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 09, 2015, 04:07:32 PM
Also, I've gone through some Maeror Tri material, and while I probably haven't absorbed that much of it, I understand what you (aquarius) mentioned about the loss of the causual appeal of musical experiance in the case of ambient and drone music. It might be of benefit to question what can be classified as music and - the counterpart -noise. I'm sure this has already been done be theorists and/or critics, but I don't have a clue where to start, really.

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 09, 2015, 04:16:16 PM
Oh, I forgot one point in my latest rant. I guess one thing that would separate music from noise is not just timbre and melody, etc. but structure. It might sound ridicolous, but this came like a revelation for me when exploring ambient music. The same could of course be said of death metal or whatever kind of mudical genre.

Re: Tangerine Dream
March 25, 2015, 04:49:56 PM
This is a musical act that eludes me for some reason. I had an album by them, which maybe had an orange cover, and with their discography stretching so long, its hard to narrow down really. I would agree its more a relaxing escape than most other common genres. It sure is not something you would want to drive along with. Eyes peeled ahead is the only way.

Re: Tangerine Dream
April 19, 2015, 06:19:14 AM
Hmmm...

An 'orange cover' sounds as though you might be thinking of that Tangram album, which was basically just a big cheese fest for moog enthusiasts after the band almost entirely lost every shred of creative potential; plus momentum flounders that ever there was.

Needless to say, do give them another chance. I would say the starting point for newcomers from a metal background would undoubtedly be their earlier material, mid 70s and earlier but most definitely starting with Phaedra.

http://www.deathmetal.org/forum/index.php/topic,18658.0.html

Re: Tangerine Dream
May 06, 2015, 11:15:02 AM
Hmmm...

An 'orange cover' sounds as though you might be thinking of that Tangram album, which was basically just a big cheese fest for moog enthusiasts after the band almost entirely lost every shred of creative potential; plus momentum flounders that ever there was.

Needless to say, do give them another chance. I would say the starting point for newcomers from a metal background would undoubtedly be their earlier material, mid 70s and earlier but most definitely starting with Phaedra.

http://www.deathmetal.org/forum/index.php/topic,18658.0.html

Hey aquarius, did you ever hear the Logos 1982 live album? It's kind of orange... I found it cheap at a record store some time ago, and it's actually not totally worthless (for being 80s TD)! It's drips of cheese at the end but side one plus beginning of side two has some nice moments. The beginning of side two is even a bit sinister.

Re: Tangerine Dream
May 08, 2015, 01:57:52 AM
Hey Spinal, nice find! I did hear it but not for a long while. Just started re-listening now and it's actually not half bad (if one can handle the cheesy 80s synth aesthetic), but I'm actually enjoying it now a lot more than I remember. So thankyou!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnBQ_Ffz0Cg