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Modernity is procedural

Modernity is procedural
February 15, 2011, 02:57:36 PM
Procedure:

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the sequence of actions or instructions to be followed in solving a problem or accomplishing a task - reference.com

Procedural inflexibility may result in punishing people who actually legally do the right thing and whos actions were successful. We also do not know if their not acting would have gotten all four murdered as witnesses along with shoppers within hearing range:

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It began when Walmart workers noticed the suspect stick a netbook under his clothes. He was met at the exit by a loss-prevention coordinator who escorted him back to the loss-prevention room at the store where three more employees joined him.

When the shoplifter pulled out the netbook, he also pulled out his handgun.

"It's cocked, guys," the gun-wielding fellow reportedly told the workers. "Don't make me do this."

One of the employees was able to wrest the gun from the suspect, who was then taken to the ground until police arrived.

Unfortunately for these four, Walmart company policy states that employees are not to engage armed suspects and they were all subsequently fired.

http://consumerist.com/2011/02/walmart-employees-fired-for-stopping-armed-robber.html

See also transactional leadership model and bureaucracy.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 15, 2011, 03:48:09 PM
Would you prefer it were object oriented? ha-HA.  Perhaps functional would be a fair middle ground. ho-ho-h... OK, enough of that.

Is it really the fact that it's procedural that's the problem or merely that the procedure is flawed?  Is tradition not in a sense procedural?  It seems the isolation and outnumber strategy was actually an effective one.  It is the passive impetus of forced victimization that is the problem.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 15, 2011, 04:02:20 PM
The flaw is that it is procedural. A fixed set of instructions are followed bereft of variables in a given context. This is universalism.

What's going on behind all this is a risk assessment placed on large sums of money. If walmart had to go to court, the procedure allows them to show that they did not in any way provoke a shooter and that he acted purely on his own, therefore the grieving families of deceased shoppers would be ineligible to much compensation if any at all.

The problem with valuing large sums of money or other private property more than what best benefits society as a whole then becomes apparent. This puts the employees into a state of cognitive dissonance with one way to escape the psychological grief: to allow for criminality by looking the other way when the store is ripped off in order to avoid the two worse evil alternatives.

1. Act to defend one another and the local property and ultimately the local community but still get dismissed as if they were in error (poisoning morality).
2. Per policy, do not act forcefully and possibly risk injury or fatality anyway. This also contributes to broken windows theory. Everybody's then ripping the place off and able to run away with no more than a verbal confrontation. The behaviour and expected response then spreads to other establishments and to private residences.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 15, 2011, 04:11:09 PM
I don't know.  Maybe I'm missing something or looking at it wrong, but I still don't see how the procedural element per se is the problem.  Imagine if you had a store that employed competent people who were armed with a procedure to shoot any motherfucker that tried this type of stuff.  That would still be procedural in essence, but seems like a good position.  Would you still object to such a system?

*edit:  Of course, rethinking it, a competent person would know in what situations they should actually break protocol.  So, I guess you have a point.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 15, 2011, 05:52:59 PM
"Use your best judgement." Why hire people incapable of consistent good judgement or even have a company in town that does not have any mentally competent staff? Tolerance for the sake of equality appearances is why everyone is stuck paying for the procedural way.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 16, 2011, 02:00:22 AM
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A fixed set of instructions are followed bereft of variables in a given context

Lack of context is crucial here. The system removes the context in which the action is situated, looking only at the aspects which are easiest to analyse, "objective" aspects - all for the sake of Reason, of course. Rather than measuring multiple factors simultaneously (which it is fucking remarkable that we have the power to do), we have to focus on those factors which we will be able to easily explain later, and act with regards to them as the rules specify.

It seems like there is no other way to do things, since you can't just know context and so can't judge based on anything other than a crude, legal-textbook approach without being biased and unscientific - but if things were actually structured well, the context of any isolated incident would be largely irrelevant with regards to the larger context which should be known to anyone involved in the leadership process. Rather than focus on technical details without regard for the larger scope present, we should focus on the orienting principles. Don't ingrain people with procedure upon procedure - rather, craft them into a person who is best able to adapt to any situation without need for these.

As has been said, common sense (weighing multiple factors relevant to the situation simultaneouly, from an intuition built naturally and experientially) is what is needed.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 16, 2011, 05:01:28 AM
Maybe I'm missing something or looking at it wrong, but I still don't see how the procedural element per se is the problem.  Imagine if you had a store that employed competent people who were armed with a procedure to shoot any motherfucker that tried this type of stuff.
In the given scenario, any problems would be probably be on the opposite end of the scale - people being shot due to mistaken perceptions.

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 16, 2011, 06:45:47 AM
What do you mean by "Modernity is procedural"? That modernity itself were a "sequence of actions or instructions to be followed in solving a problem or accomplishing a task"? I guess not. That in modernity, people often accept the craziest rules as long as they are a sequence? I would agree with that, and maybe this is even a specific trait of modernity; but then the next interesting question is: why do moderns do this? Are they gullible?

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Procedural inflexibility may result in punishing people who actually legally do the right thing and whose actions were successful. We also do not know if their not acting would have gotten all four murdered as witnesses along with shoppers within hearing range:

A silly rule was broken and the creator of the rule punished the brave rule-breakers because it was his rule, and we concede that right to him, the right to a double moral standard. Why do we grant merchants such double standards?

Re: Modernity is procedural
February 16, 2011, 07:24:24 PM
A silly rule was broken and the creator of the rule punished the brave rule-breakers because it was his rule, and we concede that right to him, the right to a double moral standard. Why do we grant merchants such double standards?

Where's the double standard here? If he had broken his own rule despite firing others for breaking it, then I could see how there'd be a double standard. But it doesn't look like that's what's going on here.