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A Manís Workout. Work out like wild animal. GRRRRRR

That's the greatest advantage of North America over Europe in my mind; all the wild spaces. I live in Northern Michigan, not totally dissimilar to Canada. After the short amount of time I spent in Europe, returning home was like coming to a jungle simply because of the abundance of trees, not to mention the relief from the disturbing lack of wildlife in Western Europe (I have deer, porcupines, various rodents, raccoons, or foxes in my backyard almost every day).

I'd love to see/hear about more Hessians interested and engaged in primitive skills. I've been taking monthly classes for about a year now, and I can't say there's anything I find personally more rewarding than spending the days in the woods making friction fires, tracking animals, and building shelters from scratch. It seems to me that outdoor skills should be a mandatory part of any hessian education! Any doubts? This should change your mind: bone collecting and hide tanning.

I agree.  I've been really wanting to learn more about wilderness survival(hunting,snares,shelters,fire etc).  Those skills just seem like they would be better learnt hands on rather than reading "how to" in books and such.  I would love to find a great spot in the wilderness, in a valley or something and set up a permanent shelter to go to when ever i like.

 Those skills just seem like they would be better learnt hands rather than reading "how to" in books and such.

Definitely. I would look for groups/organizations in the area that teach and/or practice the skills. If you can't find any that work for you, there's actually quite a bit of useful information and "how-to's" on youtube.

Here is a pretty decent survivalist site:
http://www.woodlife.co.uk/

I agree.  I've been really wanting to learn more about wilderness survival(hunting,snares,shelters,fire etc).  Those skills just seem like they would be better learnt hands rather than reading "how to" in books and such.  I would love to find a great spot in the wilderness, in a valley or something and set up a permanent shelter to go to when ever i like.
I would agree that a lot of the basics are 'learnt by hand' but some of the more advanced stuff like navigation/map-reading is best learned by reading.  Its good to understand this in the book sense first, and then take the book with you out into the field.  There are all sorts of great US Military training/field manuals on all sorts of subjects of this nature, and they usually cost less than $10.  My main recommendation of 'survivalist' stuff (other than what has already been mentioned) is don't scrimp of kit/gear.  Do plenty of research and be willing to pay a lot for the best.

Parasite:
what kind of pack do you have?  My fave is still the Kelty Yukon external frame.  I've had mine for like 20 years and the frame tubing is dented and even ripped open in a few places but I know it'll always come through.  I've had a number of really nice internal framers, but everywhere I go it seems better with the Kelty.  Its also the first choice of the finest South African mercenaries, so it has that added advantage.

Ya im probably going to look into the group training thing.  There are alot of mountaineers out there for hire as guides, those individuals are probably good for teaching along the way.  A couple of books im going to pick up soon are edible plants/flowers in BC, along with shelter building of all sorts.

Im not very picky about bags really normally i would pack my 65L TERRA North Face, that goes for overseas travel and hiking.  Before this bag i just used second hand/hand me downs from relatives.

I just looked up that Kelty... Ya that seems like a much better bag for distributing weight.  My bag is pretty much a huge sack with a top pouch and a few zippered compartments,carabiners,straps,loops and pouches.

That's the greatest advantage of North America over Europe in my mind; all the wild spaces

Depends on what you mean with Europe. Scandinavia and Finland is almost one big wilderness, and of course there's also the endless Russia next door. I have lived in northern Sweden for all my life and I haven't even discovered all the nature surrounding my own town yet.

Cross-country skiing is good workout by the way, gets your arms and legs going, and you can choose if you want to train your stamina, strenght, or explositivity.

That's the greatest advantage of North America over Europe in my mind; all the wild spaces

Depends on what you mean with Europe. Scandinavia and Finland is almost one big wilderness, and of course there's also the endless Russia next door. I have lived in northern Sweden for all my life and I haven't even discovered all the nature surrounding my own town yet.

Cross-country skiing is good workout by the way, gets your arms and legs going, and you can choose if you want to train your stamina, strenght, or explositivity.

I should've specified that I really meant Western/Southern Europe. Unfortunately I've never been to the extreme North or East.

Back to the original topic of 'manly workouts':

Pull-Press-Squat (Steve Pulcinella, Ironsport Gym)

I like swimming and rowing because it is a natural form of fitness and I can feel the primordial serenity of the water. Weight lifting and martial arts etc just seems like you're attracting violence.

Here we find Evolaís consecrated warrior, a noble in character and action. There is no place for such a man in the modern world of the Kali Yuga. I think it is a mistake to assume that Evolaís embrace of the warrior is a simple endorsement of violence as an end in itselfóthe warrior is one who lives outside himself, not because he can find no solid spiritual ground in his inner being, but that his achievements are necessary to preserve the sacred tradition. In his ultimate state, the warrior can achieve a kind of ecstasy. Hindu mysticism calls this ananda; a blissful state of higher consciousness. In Christianity, this condition was felt by St. John of the Cross (1542-1591) and Meister Eckhart (1260-1328). But it is important to emphasize that for Evolaís consecrated warrior, such a condition is not achieved through pure contemplation (as in the monastic life for instance), but through action.
http://www.juliusevola.com/archive/2008/01/25/War_and_Heroism_(part_one)

Chin ups and pull ups are excellent because your putting everything from the waist up in some seriously strenious exercise.  I recommend the IRON GYM portable chin up bar, its great and its only about 40 bucks.  Lifting your knees to your chest while suspended in the air....fuckin tears your core.

I'm going to have to get myself one of those IRON GYM devices.  Chin ups are the most fun exercise besides climbing a tree.  What I need is a set of in-home monkey bars or perhaps one of those playground geodesic domes made out of steel tubing.

Being outdoors with people/friends is great.  A natural social order/heirarchy emerges that tends to get everything done and taken care of.  Hiding from people when you are out camping is always fun - I've had friends walk within feet of me while I calmly eat a tortilla and never see me at all.  Don't look for just cover, you also need to make sure you have at least one covered exfiltration route.  Bring food, because eating while hiding makes you feel more impudent.

It seems to me that outdoor skills should be a mandatory part of any hessian education! Any doubts? This should change your mind: bone collecting and hide tanning.
I knew a woman in college who was into bone collecting and hide tanning(it sounds much dirtier than it actually is).  We saw each other at a lot of the same parties and it was always good fun talking about skinning dead animals and how to get all the meat off of a bone so it doesn't stink and watching all the prissy, over-drunk hedonists around us get ill and turn away aghast.  What I want is to be able to shoot a few buffalo - the meat is fantastic and their hides would be just wonderful to have around the house.  A shitload of fucking work, but once they were done, they'd be great as a throw-blanket or couch cover or whatever.

I just looked up that Kelty... Ya that seems like a much better bag for distributing weight.  My bag is pretty much a huge sack with a top pouch and a few zippered compartments,carabiners,straps,loops and pouches.
I tend to get a lot of crap from people about it.  They seem to think of it as a boy scout bag or something of that nature.  Seems like everyone uses internal frame packs these days, even the old-schoolers.  I went on a ten day excursion through the Frank Church Wilderness in Idaho a few years back with some folks who insisted my kelty was not going to be 'good enough.'  It turns out I was fine and it surprised them even more when they realized that like half the shit I was carrying was weapons and weapons-related.

Then once your done go beat each other up.

The problem I find with this is that all of the people I know bar two or three are terrified of experiencing any pain at all (which might account for their not doing anything proper at the gym).  I'd love to get some kind of "fight club"-esque boxing/martial arts group going, if only because it's better to learn to fight by fighting than it is to learn by going through set exercises and combinations.  I might just go out and hit random strangers.

I could take the pain easy, but I wouldn't be thrilled by the prospect of long-term medical expenses. Fighting is nice in theory, but unfortunately it costs money! Or if you lose enough teeth, you could wear dentures I suppose...

In any case, if we're talking about working out physically to fight well, then I think it's important to at least make mention of the importance of working out mentally to fight well. You can work out like an animal all you want and your mind can still hold you back.

It's good to hear you guys talking about wilderness skills and activities.  It's an old stereotype that starting up an ideologically based, self sufficient community out in the woods is a "pipe dream."  The reality though is that surviving the coming hardships and rebuilding a better society while living in the major cities is the real pipe dream.  In fact, there are several "communes" where I live in the wilderness of interior Alaska.  I don't think any of them are fully self sufficient, but they come quite close.  Furthermore, activities like trapping, subsistence fishing and hunting, and general wilderness recreation are popular among most of the locals, even as recreation for those with "normal" full time jobs (there really isn't much else to do...).    This area is attractive because of arable soil, abundant fish and game, general uncrowdedness, cheap land ($1,000 / acre is common), NO property taxes, NO zoning or building codes, and just because it's really beautiful.  Dragging some more enthusiastic and right-minded people up here is definetely in my best interest, and I'd be happy to answer questions, either about far northwest North America, or about remote, subsistence living in general.  Also, here's a bunch of my pictures from the area: http://img257.imageshack.us/g/dsc0434y.jpg/

A few posts back, something was said about Vancouver as a destination for this sort of thing.  Bear in mind that Van. is a major metropolis, and will not support anything beyond purely recreational hiking and backpacking.  That said, it is probably my favorite among cities I've been to (I went to university just across the border in WA).  If you're looking for a lifestyle more than an activity though, the more interior regions of British Columbia are where you want to look (Pemberton, Golden, Revelstoke, Cranbrook, and many others).  Just get on Google Earth and look for farm fields.

Although recreation as an end to itself is becoming less attractive to me (as compared to subsistence activities), I have a long history of backpacking and mountaineering, and I still enjoy exploratory, off-trail backpacking trips, and I'm considering the purchase of a small boat for floating wilderness rivers.  There is no doubt that these sorts of activities will get you into better shape than you've ever been.  The physical fitness is merely a bonus - it's the mental fitness and wellbeing that stickes with you.


-Will, Delta Jct. AK

hahaha yea nobody wants to lose teeth, shit, i know how expensive dental is.  Well if you did have a group of you that enjoy fighting you could always throw some mouth guards in and maybe some lightweight boxing gloves.

Well i think its agreed that the wilderness, and everything you can do in the wilderness is the ultimate workout.  Yup, i sure do love being out in the bush. There is way to many pampered people around nowadays that can only handle a crummy 3 night camping trip.....in their trailers.

A few posts back, something was said about Vancouver as a destination for this sort of thing.  Bear in mind that Van. is a major metropolis, and will not support anything beyond purely recreational hiking and backpacking.  That said, it is probably my favorite among cities I've been to (I went to university just across the border in WA).  If you're looking for a lifestyle more than an activity though, the more interior regions of British Columbia are where you want to look (Pemberton, Golden, Revelstoke, Cranbrook, and many others).  Just get on Google Earth and look for farm fields.

Vancouver's a preliminary destination - we're going to be moving to Canada, and we need some kind of central base, just to make sure we don't fall flat on our arses as soon as we move into wilder territory.  A couple of years in the outskirts of the city/nearby towns, then moving further in the middle of nowhere as we go.  Cheers for the recommendations of possible places, though - I'll keep them in mind, and suggest them to the group when I next see them.