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Liturgy: Mission accomplished?

Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 08, 2011, 06:44:59 PM
Mission accomplished?

The other day Liturgy posted a link to this article on their facebook: http://www.pitchfork.com/reviews/tracks/12157-generation/

So apparently the incredibly strong backlash against their stupidity forced them to admit they were hipster posers and stop pretending they were black metal.

Well done ANUS, I am proud.

I hope a stong enough of an example was made of these guys so future hipsters will know better.

The band themselves did not say that they are hipsters, but their music now distances them more from black metal, and they posted a link to an article which DID call them hipsters.  Its not a 100% win, but it is going in the right direction.  I still encourage people to troll this band untill it is 100% certain they have ended any relationship attempt with black metal.

Unfortunately they still use the silly self description of 'transcendental black metal'.  So they are probably convincing a lot of hipsters that black metal is as weak and pathetic as their music and message are.  So there is still more work to be done.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 08, 2011, 07:40:59 PM
N O B O D Y C A R E S

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 08, 2011, 08:26:42 PM
Says the guy who was FUCKIN WRONG

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 08, 2011, 08:38:08 PM
Quote
In the metal world, Brooklyn's Liturgy has been the subject of debate and derision ever since the release of their polarizing 2009 debut, Renihilation. Not only did these four skinny kids from New York's hipster enclave play black metal while wearing street clothes, but they also got arrogant and philosophical with the stuff. That didn't sit so well.

The criticisms and doubts didn't force Liturgy into black metal orthodoxy; rather, the band pushed further afield, signing to Thrill Jockey and finishing a record that upends any expectation of what you'd expect from Liturgy or black metal. As heard on the instrumental monster "Generation", Liturgy's second effort affirms each of those big ideas frontman Hunter Hunt-Hendrix loves. Suggesting Glenn Branca and Don Caballero more than Mayhem, "Generation" repeats its riff as though the record were broken. For the guitars, any motion is incremental, with crisp waves of distortion occasionally smearing into layers of dissonance. The charge here comes from drummer Greg Fox, who explores the possibilities of his small kit-- letting the high-hats rest, letting them ring, limiting the action mostly to his combat-ready snares-- with a pioneer's zeal. It's like seven minutes of the introduction to the best rock'n'roll song you know. A tune like this might lose Liturgy whatever heavy metal rights they had earned; when you're pumping your fists, though, to minimalist metal this ecstatic and transcendent, it's really hard to care.
Meh.  I don't see this as a particular win.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 08, 2011, 08:57:14 PM
N O B O D Y C A R E S

Apparently you care a great deal.


Quote
In the metal world, Brooklyn's Liturgy has been the subject of debate and derision ever since the release of their polarizing 2009 debut, Renihilation. Not only did these four skinny kids from New York's hipster enclave play black metal while wearing street clothes, but they also got arrogant and philosophical with the stuff. That didn't sit so well.

The criticisms and doubts didn't force Liturgy into black metal orthodoxy; rather, the band pushed further afield, signing to Thrill Jockey and finishing a record that upends any expectation of what you'd expect from Liturgy or black metal. As heard on the instrumental monster "Generation", Liturgy's second effort affirms each of those big ideas frontman Hunter Hunt-Hendrix loves. Suggesting Glenn Branca and Don Caballero more than Mayhem, "Generation" repeats its riff as though the record were broken. For the guitars, any motion is incremental, with crisp waves of distortion occasionally smearing into layers of dissonance. The charge here comes from drummer Greg Fox, who explores the possibilities of his small kit-- letting the high-hats rest, letting them ring, limiting the action mostly to his combat-ready snares-- with a pioneer's zeal. It's like seven minutes of the introduction to the best rock'n'roll song you know. A tune like this might lose Liturgy whatever heavy metal rights they had earned; when you're pumping your fists, though, to minimalist metal this ecstatic and transcendent, it's really hard to care.
Meh.  I don't see this as a particular win.

You're right. More review sites need to start ripping apart Liturgy and hipster BM. M-A could use some negative reviews too.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 09, 2011, 02:23:15 AM
Holy shit, that track was retarded.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 09, 2011, 02:52:00 AM
Holy shit, that track was retarded.

I like how they made minor additions and changes to the original boring riff.  Really keeps the whole things uninteresting in various slightly different ways.  HOW IS THIS SHIT CONSIDERED METAL????

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 09, 2011, 02:56:42 AM
From the pitchfork article:
Quote
A tune like this might lose Liturgy whatever heavy metal rights they had earned; when you're pumping your fists, though, to minimalist metal this ecstatic and transcendent, it's really hard to care.

I suppose the only fist pumping you'd be doing is deep fisting into the anal cavity of another man while listening to this FUCKING HORSESHIT.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 09, 2011, 03:35:04 AM
Mission accomplished?

What was the mission again?

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 09, 2011, 04:48:27 PM
I support ANY actions taken against this band, and others that are contrary to true black metal no matter what the extreme.

Remember the extremes the original black metal adherents went to for their beliefs, the church arsons, the murders?  Almost 100 churches burned throughout Europe?  Now?  Nothing.  The black metal scene has lost its convictions and that is why posers and weaklings have infiltrated our music.
Some say Euronymous and others were planning to kill a Christian metal band before his death, maybe it was not true, but those were the types of things that they would do, because they actually stood behind their beliefs.

Only the return of that type of extremism can bring back the true flame of black metal.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 09, 2011, 05:14:27 PM
Only the return of that type of extremism can bring back the true flame of black metal.


Is this Zickleinmorder?

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 10, 2011, 02:27:53 AM
Who cares if it's a win or not... indie metal needs to be mocked. It's a failure. It lost the spirit of metal, and became tweebo indie crap instead.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 10, 2011, 03:27:04 AM
When asked what their super-boring new single is about, Liturgy said, "The idea was to create a Meshuggah song with one note instead of two notes."  HAAAA

I'll admit, it looks like Anus.com activism pushed them to record a new album without any black metal characteristics.  But the new inane math-rock style, still called Pure Transcendental Black Metal?>>>maybe Liturgy really IS a wicked-deep extreme trollage.

Anyway, the crusaders here might want to turn their malice towards Deafheaven.

Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 10, 2011, 03:48:08 AM
The most ironic thing about this "activism" is that it is exactly the same thing that hipsters do if they want to get a band out of their circle.


Re: Liturgy: Mission accomplished?
April 10, 2011, 07:09:27 AM
There must be irony in any group wanting to ostracize something from being a part of it by spreading the word about it in a negative manner, then.