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Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does

Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
April 18, 2011, 09:09:57 AM
Quote
The alternative theory holds that the origins of altruism and teamwork have nothing to do with kinship or the degree of relatedness between individuals. The key, Wilson said, is the group: Under certain circumstances, groups of cooperators can out-compete groups of non-cooperators, thereby ensuring that their genes — including the ones that predispose them to cooperation — are handed down to future generations. This so-called group selection, Wilson insists, is what forms the evolutionary basis for a variety of advanced social behaviors linked to altruism, teamwork, and tribalism — a position that other scientists have taken over the years, but which historically has been considered, in Wilson’s own word, “heresy.”

http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2011/04/17/where_does_good_come_from/?page=full

Individualists form their own team, a team of individualists only, and oppose all other teams.

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
April 18, 2011, 07:08:26 PM
yep, "us vs them" is how people function

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
April 19, 2011, 11:23:37 AM
Egalitarian wet dream:

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Dozens of studies have found that top performers - whether in maths, music or whatever - learn no faster than those who reach lower levels of attainment - hour after hour, they improve at almost identical rates.

The difference is simply that high achievers practise for more hours. Further research has shown that when students seem to possess a particular gift, it is often because they have been given extra tuition at home by their parents.

This is not to deny that some kids start out better than others - it is merely to suggest that the starting point we have in life is not particularly relevant.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-13128701

This is probably correct if you want basic competence, and nothing else.

For genius? Totally irrelevant.

Even more, it fails to mention that most people no matter how hard they study won't go far.

The egalitarian wet dream flogs on, humidly.

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
April 19, 2011, 11:36:14 AM
That study, if taken at face value, shows that there are inequalities of motivation/discipline: some people focus more on developing practical, useful skills, and so end up being better at these things than others.  The people who don't focus on such things are the proles, who laze around watching T.V. and living off benefits, while the people who do focus are the elites, who actually get shit done.

That's not to say that this study as accurate in the slightest - sounds like grade A bullshit, to me.  I know plenty of people, myself included, who are naturally "good" at certain things, and have little to no natural affinity for others.

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
April 20, 2011, 03:11:33 AM
That's not to say that this study as accurate in the slightest - sounds like grade A bullshit, to me.  I know plenty of people, myself included, who are naturally "good" at certain things, and have little to no natural affinity for others.

They do the usual liberal cherry-picking. They're not comparing Mozart to Malevolent Creation here; they're comparing two third-rate Hootie and the Blowfish clones. Among people with no exceptional ability, obviously hours on task matters.

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
April 20, 2011, 06:50:21 AM
"We took a cross section of retards and found that all of them were retarded.  Obviously, this means that 'retardation' is a stupid concept, because we're all retarded, so anyone who uses the word 'retard' is just a nasty person."

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
May 04, 2011, 01:10:21 PM
Quote
Laurent Keller of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland wondered if he could resolve the debate using a computer simulation. He and roboticists Markus Waibel and Dario Floreano, both from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale of Lausanne, started with real-life robots that are just a couple of centimeters high. The robots have two independently operating wheels and a "nervous system" composed of sensors and a camera, which allow them to detect small discs—a stand in for food.

The researchers then created virtual representations of these robots on a computer so that they could observe the robots' evolution over time. In real life, random mutations build up over many generations, leading to adaptations that help organisms better survive in their environment. In the simulation, the researchers replicated this process by randomly varying the strengths of the various connections that made up the robots' nervous systems. Some of these "mutations" helped the robots better gather the food disks, while some made the robots less efficient at the task.

Once the team was comfortable with the virtual evolution environment it had set up, it added a new twist: It allowed the robots to share food disks with each other. If Hamilton's hypothesis was correct, "successful" virtual robots were likely to be those that were closely related and shared food with each other; that would help to ensure that at least one of them -- and some of the genes of both—would make it to the next round. (Two robots with a modest amount of food disks would both be more likely to be cut from the simulation, but if one robot gave all of its food to a second robot, that second robot would likely make the next round.) And indeed, altruism quickly evolved in the simulation, with greater food-sharing in groups where robots were more related, the researchers report online today in PLoS Biology. The more closely related the robots, the quicker they cooperated. "It shows how general the [theory] is, whether you are an insect, a human or a robot," says Floreano.

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/05/even-robots-can-be-heroes.html?ref=hp

Did they then vote Dmeocratic?

Re: Altruism doesn't exist; teamwork does
May 04, 2011, 01:12:46 PM
Quote
The alternative theory holds that the origins of altruism and teamwork have nothing to do with kinship or the degree of relatedness between individuals. The key, Wilson said, is the group: Under certain circumstances, groups of cooperators can out-compete groups of non-cooperators, thereby ensuring that their genes — including the ones that predispose them to cooperation — are handed down to future generations. This so-called group selection, Wilson insists, is what forms the evolutionary basis for a variety of advanced social behaviors linked to altruism, teamwork, and tribalism — a position that other scientists have taken over the years, but which historically has been considered, in Wilson’s own word, “heresy.”

http://articles.boston.com/2011-04-17/bostonglobe/29428429_1_altruism-mole-rats-evolutionary-theory/4

Go team!