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Why the 1990s were good for metal

Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 12, 2011, 12:58:01 PM
Quote
Why did Thrash Metal go out of fashion in the late 80s / early 90s? Was it necessary?
"You can blame it on the advertisers who buy ads on radio stations and TV stations. The advertisers always want to advertise to males between ages 18 – 25. These are the people who haven’t started families yet and have lots of free money to spend. The problem with Metal in 1990 was that the advertisers thought the fans were too old. The advertisers wanted young fans.

So, there were some major advertisers who started saying "I will not advertise my product on any radio station that plays Iron Maiden” or whoever. I used to be a DJ at KROQ long ago so I knew lots of radio people. I remember them telling me that they were substituting the Seattle style of music for Metal because the advertisors thought it attracted a younger audience. And, after the radio stations followed the pressure of the advertisers, there eventually was very few places for Metal in the media. And, when there are few outlets supporting Metal, anybody knows it is going to be very hard to make money.”

http://www.voicesfromthedarkside.de/interviews/new-renaissance-records.htm

Makes sense. We want new clueless youth, not the people who were 17 in 1983 and listening to IRON MAIDEN.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 12, 2011, 06:18:22 PM
Yeah yeah I know, the 80's and 90's were fucking magical and the 21st century is crap and the new generation are all retards.

What reason will you come up with next for why all the young whippersnappers aren't nearly as cool as your generation?

At least you'll be able to ride the bus for free soon.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 12, 2011, 07:22:35 PM
Yeah yeah I know, the 80's and 90's were fucking magical and the 21st century is crap and the new generation are all retards.

What reason will you come up with next for why all the young whippersnappers aren't nearly as cool as your generation?

At least you'll be able to ride the bus for free soon.

You're barking up the wrong tree. The point is that when commercial interest left metal alone, it did better, and that grunge/alternative was always a sell-out.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 12, 2011, 09:29:23 PM
As to why the millennials have not made quality metal:

This is a complex issue. The answer is not as simple as "millennials are turds."

Millennials, like Baby Boomers, grew up in a huge boom... in this case the dot-com debacle. They then turned to liberalism, having no other targets.

They never saw a world before total media immersion... the thought of people being only able to afford a black and white TV, and thus only having that, is alien to them.

They grew up in a time of easy money (fast loans) and expenditure on personal goods before worrying about essentials. A time of welfare, of bailouts, of make-work easy jobs (both union and not).

The type of epic conflict that 1970s, 1980s and 1990s music saw may be alien to them.

Last days of the new $oviet Republic...

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 18, 2011, 03:09:53 AM
1980s: first time people could record CDs cheaply.

Just after DIY punk, everyone wanting to take punk to the next stage.

Also, the kids of the Baby Boomers... the real inheritors of Vietnam and WWII.

The Cold War in full flare, but also, the first stirrings of plastic American society...

1950s America was fake but beautiful, nice; 1960s turned the place against itself; 1970s was hollow but the nice people could still just glide through and pretend it was going to turn out OK.

1980s showed us our future: bad politics, endless racial conflict, corruption and failure.

That's why Generation X was so fucked up. They saw the last dregs of beautiful innocent America and then right about when they hit 16, they saw the coming storm.

Millennials/Y have no clue.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 18, 2011, 04:43:42 PM
Good people create good societies which are then inherited by their children (civilisation rising); the reverse is also true (civilisation declining).  At the moment, progressive generations are inheriting and adding to the severe list of bad practices which their parents' generations had inherited from their parents, going back probably to the end of the second world war (when most of the good/honourable/aristocratic people were shot on both sides, and the cowards/retards were left to rebuild from the rubble of a broken world).  Our civilisation is declining exponentially, as our decline foments further decline in future generations.

I have a feeling that we went too far in the wrong direction around the '70s, and now our own acceleration towards destruction means that any efforts made with a view to reversing the damage done to our societies is doomed to merely slow down the inevitable end of the glorious Christian Empire (indeed, these are the end times, as we're not even Christians any more).

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 20, 2011, 08:41:05 AM
Good people create good societies which are then inherited by their children (civilisation rising); the reverse is also true (civilisation declining).  At the moment, progressive generations are inheriting and adding to the severe list of bad practices which their parents' generations had inherited from their parents, going back probably to the end of the second world war (when most of the good/honourable/aristocratic people were shot on both sides, and the cowards/retards were left to rebuild from the rubble of a broken world).

I agree with all of that except the timing. The 1920s generations were fucked; WWI was the real disaster, and it was really fallout from 1789 and 1861.


Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 20, 2011, 09:03:04 AM
How important do you think the secularisation of Europe was in terms of the decline of the civilisation?  It seems to me that it was the Enlightenment, and the subsequent chic of Atheism amongst the educated, which allowed for the masses to fly in the face of Divine Right and kick their (in many cases arguably shitty) nobles out.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
June 28, 2011, 09:02:43 PM
Good people create good societies which are then inherited by their children (civilisation rising); the reverse is also true (civilisation declining).  At the moment, progressive generations are inheriting and adding to the severe list of bad practices which their parents' generations had inherited from their parents, going back probably to the end of the second world war (when most of the good/honourable/aristocratic people were shot on both sides, and the cowards/retards were left to rebuild from the rubble of a broken world).

I agree with all of that except the timing. The 1920s generations were fucked; WWI was the real disaster, and it was really fallout from 1789 and 1861.



Agree.  WW1 was where Europe and all that was good about it was destroyed.  WWII was just bloated shells of old countries beating the dead horse and then dividing up the spoils when they were done.   Every military conflict since then has been a result of this division.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
July 02, 2011, 01:38:03 PM
That's why Generation X was so fucked up. They saw the last dregs of beautiful innocent America and then right about when they hit 16, they saw the coming storm.

I may have a paraphrased version of this inscribed upon my tombstone when the time comes - it sums up so much about those years so succinctly!   

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
August 09, 2011, 11:08:25 PM
How important do you think the secularisation of Europe was in terms of the decline of the civilisation?  It seems to me that it was the Enlightenment, and the subsequent chic of Atheism amongst the educated, which allowed for the masses to fly in the face of Divine Right and kick their (in many cases arguably shitty) nobles out.

Personally, I think it was very important. I'm not the type of person to regularly sing the praises of Christianity, but its decline clearly contributed to upsetting the entire social order of Europe. The old French expression ni maître ni dieu succinctly expresses the feeling. Industrialization and the emphasis on "scientific" modes of thought removed the veil of mystery surrounding European civilization and its system of governance. The events of 1789, 1848, and 1917 display the consequences of this thinking quite well.

That being said, it doesn't necessarily help that much of the European aristocracy was decadent and fragile. The French noblesse d'épée (lit. "nobles of the sword") were the descendants of knights and lords whose titles were almost nonsensical, given how far removed they were from the function (i.e. soldiery) of their ancestors. An aristocracy founded on military grounds ought to at least maintain that tradition if it's worth anything, in my view.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
August 09, 2011, 11:16:38 PM
1980s showed us our future: bad politics, endless racial conflict, corruption and failure.

That's why Generation X was so fucked up. They saw the last dregs of beautiful innocent America and then right about when they hit 16, they saw the coming storm.

Millennials/Y have no clue.

Just out of curiosity, do you think it's possible for the current generation to come to a similar realization down the road? The type of ugliness Generation X was exposed to is something generally celebrated today, so perhaps that numbs the current group a bit. The hysteria surrounding terrorism is both similar and dissimilar to the Cold War milieu, but I think as the international stature of the US begins to slip away, younger people today will have the same feeling that many in Western Europe would have to have had at the end of the 5th century: the uneasy feeling that what had been there before was imperceptibly but irrevocably gone and that things would never be as good as they once had been during a golden age that nobody then living was old enough to remember.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
August 10, 2011, 02:38:45 AM
1980s showed us our future: bad politics, endless racial conflict, corruption and failure.

That's why Generation X was so fucked up. They saw the last dregs of beautiful innocent America and then right about when they hit 16, they saw the coming storm.

Millennials/Y have no clue.

Just out of curiosity, do you think it's possible for the current generation to come to a similar realization down the road? The type of ugliness Generation X was exposed to is something generally celebrated today, so perhaps that numbs the current group a bit. The hysteria surrounding terrorism is both similar and dissimilar to the Cold War milieu, but I think as the international stature of the US begins to slip away, younger people today will have the same feeling that many in Western Europe would have to have had at the end of the 5th century: the uneasy feeling that what had been there before was imperceptibly but irrevocably gone and that things would never be as good as they once had been during a golden age that nobody then living was old enough to remember.

This is not a good comparison.  The early middle-ages in Europe was a period of transformation, not disintegration as many believe.  There was no great collapse as such.  Modern western civilisation is a different case, it is about to reach a point where it can no longer support its own bloated form, and there is nothing to take its place when this happens.

Re: Why the 1990s were good for metal
August 12, 2011, 03:39:14 AM
The hysteria surrounding terrorism is both similar and dissimilar to the Cold War milieu, but I think as the international stature of the US begins to slip away, younger people today will have the same feeling that many in Western Europe would have to have had at the end of the 5th century: the uneasy feeling that what had been there before was imperceptibly but irrevocably gone and that things would never be as good as they once had been during a golden age that nobody then living was old enough to remember.

I would call it marketing today in contrast to understandable fear during the Cold War. The war on terror has more in the way of commercial interests in the foreground such as private security as well as in the supporting roles like communications and military equipment. There are highly lucrative defense industry products today, the value of which is inflated by marketing their necessity through all sorts of venues like news media and lobbying.

During the Cold War, except for the manufacturing side, active defense was almost entirely government but it was vital. It was also effective from the strategic military side but seeing the cultural marxism flourishing everywhere in the West, completely failed us in counter-intelligence.

We were looking intently to the spy satellites, new fighter aircraft and upgunned tanks when we also needed to look to the defense of the intangible such as our foundational traditional values. So, to put things in context, we end up with elementary particle hipster acts instead of a thriving underground of metal bands who are all on the same page. In other words the leftists are able to crowd out the fascists.