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Hinge albums

Re: Hinge albums
September 07, 2006, 08:21:44 PM
Agreed, Breaking the law is a great song, especially the live version on video because of its speed. I actually like "another thing comin" but it is pure stadium pandering. Painkiller was okay, and I heard a new song off the new album I liked called Hell Rising, but only once. The rest of the time the fucking radio plays that godawful Angel of Retribution. Stained Glass still rules though, and Sad Wings of Destiny.
I think you could say Opeth is like a living Hinge album. some good material but too choked up with bullshit.

LEGION

Re: Hinge albums
September 07, 2006, 08:46:42 PM
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1. Metallica - Metallica
2. Slayer - Divine Intervention
3. Ancient - The Cainian Chronicles
4. Deicide - last four albums
5. Black Sabbath - Never Say Die
6. Iron Maiden - No Prayer for the Dying
7. Dorkthrone - Ravishing Grimness
8. Napalm Death - Words from the Exit Womb
9. Morbid Angel - Domination
10. Nuclear Assault - Out of Order

used also as troll on emo forum


I agree for the most part with this list, although...

Iron Maiden- Somewhere in Time
Napalm Death- Fear, Emptiness, Despair

..and for the record, I too enjoyed "Divine Intervention", it was a good sounding album, very raw and energetic..."Diablaudufj in musakdp" is where it really started getting extremely horrible!


Re: Hinge albums
September 07, 2006, 10:43:30 PM
This thread seems altogether rather silly. Why don't we put down Black Sabbath- Paranoid, as well?  :P

I can understand Metallica- Black Album, but too much of this is just people picking their personal preferences and then others going even further back for their own various reasons. Eventually it would break down to only the first one of two albums being considered as having any tremendous worth and everything else as shit. Again another problem with an "online" metal community rather then one that meets in person.

Vajra

Re: Hinge albums
September 08, 2006, 12:18:26 AM
You've misunderstood the thread if you nominate an album because it's the first release you didn't like after a number that you thought were good.

It's mainly objective criteria that show which are hinge albums. Sure, you can't measure for example, lack of conceptual depth or some audience-demanded intention, but it will manifest in the music. Whether it's through catchy or conventional, copy-cat riffing or Death Metal-cum-radio-friendly arrangements or gimmicks (Dimmu Borgir's use of Black Metal vocals and kick-drumming I find the most amusing), it's scientific when a band has strayed to cater for the widest audience or a scene.

On a side note: At The Gates's discography is a weird one because their downfall begins with WFIKTBD, but they start to crowd-please on Terminal Spirit Disease. It just sounds like ATG were having bad days when they wrote most of those songs for 'With Fear...'

Re: Hinge albums
September 08, 2006, 02:32:31 AM
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It just sounds like ATG were having bad days when they wrote most of those songs for 'With Fear...'


In what way?

Annihilaytorr

Re: Hinge albums
September 08, 2006, 03:49:43 AM
There are several types of hinge albums.  Trying to group the decline of all bands into one uniform pattern is kind of silly folks. Sometimes creative decline foreshadows the actual selling out. The two are not mutually occurring with every band. Some bands produce shitty albums for a while before selling out - Arise is pretty metal just not as good as the stuff before. Chaos AD and beyond are total mallcore. In these situations, declining creativity and spirit leaves a band with no reason to play the music they've at this point invested 5+ years in usually. Jobless, these bands continue to create music now in an effort to feed the children/drug habits they have picked up from after show parties. And Justice For All is in no way a sell out but at this point the band wanders around over long songs and loses some of the unity previous albums have, despite some of the singularly best songs of their career being found on the album. The ideas were there, but the decline was already visible. Metallica’s best move was to record the self titled after Justice, because the slick pop rock production of the album by Bob Rock took what was left in the band, and molded it into a hugely successful and marketable pop album. I would honestly rather listen to that over whatever Metallica would have recorded if left to their own devices.

Another situation is when a sellout occurs when bands still have some ideology or ideas floating around - Domination again I think is the best example.  Though rare, this can be recovered from if there are immediate changes in line up and label following the album.

Some bands immediately drop into the shitter without cause and for no apparent reason, showing both a complete loss of passion and a simultaneous desire to sell records following their best work.  I haven't heard Whisper Supremacy (Slyptopsy) in a while but that always struck me as one of those kinds of albums. Once Upon the Cross still has some semblances of true Deicide in it, but is so inexplicably below Legion that you could almost group that here as well.

Then you have bands which are progressing musically legitimately, and playing with new ideas and attempting to make forward progression, while evolving towards a more mainstream sound - Heartwork is a shining example of this.  In these situations bands allow their original heavy metal/rock influences come through more in their music as they "mature". South of Heaven can be included here as well.

Vajra

Re: Hinge albums
September 08, 2006, 05:07:56 AM
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In what way?


It's a not bad album that begins to wander after the first four excellent songs. From there, it's parts become more disparate. The riffs seem less coherent as the affair gets more experimental, and I'm sure it's not because I can't follow it (ateleological is a cool neologism I've heard somewhere that could apply here!). I've listened to it many times, and the sloppiness of the overall effort is obvious now. I don't suppose the production does the melodic-rhythmic direction ATG persue here any favours either. The guitar sound favours melody but not rhythm, which it leaves dead.

I think At The Gates failed to totally immerse their musical senses in what they wanted to convey and what we get is an album that maybe falls short of acheiving its own vision. I can't say it has the integrity-lacking failings of any mall-Metal-product, though.

Vajra

Re: Hinge albums
September 08, 2006, 11:21:35 PM
I listened to this album once last night, and had a completely different experience of it even though I've owned it for about six months. I still have negligible issues with the production, and the song 'Through The Red' which is a waste of time. 'Ever-Opening Flower' seems to conclude the 'story' of WFIKTBD better.

The seminal masters of melodic death metal return on their second album with a dark and dynamic portrayal of the soul that goes beyond good and evil to find only pain and sufferign, but derives a sense of beauty from it. This is a graphic journey that can rouse the most apathetic.
A rebellious yet thoughtful restlessness dictates the flow of the music according to the focus of each song - the emotion and dynamic of each passage - subjecting it to constant change.
Melodies bounce off subordinate riffs that shape the eclectic yet logical structure of each song, varying in strength of tone and rhythm to highlight the melodic phrasing with greater emotional depth.
This interaction between guitars is very free and expressive, yet still tightly bound as the percussion and bass support the general mood and motion of the riffs.
Previously, this slow-witted listener found himself lost within a perpetual change of riffs that seemed incoherent and disparate, but patience revealed that the more experimental edge that pervades this album underscores every change of riff, tone and tempo with the emotional unease that finally made it such a poignant work.
At the same time, it's a death metal album that sounds the closest to classical music yet, and it is to the great credit of the artists that they seem to have left no combination unexplored in the persuit of an atmosphere that immerses the listener in the richness of their poetry.

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 04:25:50 AM
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Entombed - Clandestine

Actually, I think Wolverine Blues qualifies; an entertaining `death and roll` affair sold on the back of a  a cheesy comic tie-in which was probably designed to cater to a more mainstream audience. For me, Clandestine wasnt as entertaining as Left Hand Path, but no less artistically valid or in anyway pandering, in my opinion.

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 05:10:11 AM
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Indecent and Obscene? U outch yo mind boi....


I remembered this being on par with "Pieces": refinement of the aesthetic which made their first album great through a somewhat oversimplified songwriting approach which left more to be desired structurally, as but a shadow remained of their former dynamicism.

I was mistaken; for all intents and purposes "Indecent & Obscene" is a rock album.

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 05:19:26 AM
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Actually, I think Wolverine Blues qualifies; an entertaining `death and roll` affair sold on the back of a  a cheesy comic tie-in which was probably designed to cater to a more mainstream audience. For me, Clandestine wasnt as entertaining as Left Hand Path, but no less artistically valid or in anyway pandering, in my opinion.


Entombed always relied heavily on its hardcore punk influences, which is why certain parts of their first album sounded akin to grindcore. "Clandestine," however, similarly as did Sepultura's "Arise," showed an overreliance on this approach, revealing a retrogression to extraneous genres when the band was staggering out of ideas. Like "Arise," "Clandestine" is palatable, but similarly disappointing in its foreshadowing of the direction each band would assume.

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 09:54:26 AM
The 'hinge albums' concept is an interesting one.

Classic examples:

Immortal At the Heart of Winter - The heavy-metal-as-black-metal approach works to near perfection here, but later releases turn it into a crowd-pleasing formula to fill the void left by the absence of ideas.

Carcass Heartwork - The melodic deathgrind of the previous album reappears in a chunkier, stripped down, rocked-up format.  Like a twinkie - enjoyably empty calories that point to cancer down the road.

DarkThrone Panzerfaust - While later albums are totally devoid of merit, this album marked the first time that DarkThrone essentially reworked its influences.

Iconoclast_2

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 02:49:59 PM
Burzum - Filosofem

Okay album, but it really shows that Varg's later material will end up being something you'd expect on the carebears cartoon.

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 03:08:46 PM
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Burzum - Filosofem

Okay album, but it really shows that Varg's later material will end up being something you'd expect on the carebears cartoon.


WTF!?

Re: Hinge albums
September 09, 2006, 05:20:53 PM
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Burzum - Filosofem

Okay album, but it really shows that Varg's later material will end up being something you'd expect on the carebears cartoon.


Heh, perhaps more metalheads should watch Carebears, then. They might learn a thing or two...