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Hinge albums

Vajra

Re: Hinge albums
September 18, 2006, 04:36:53 AM
The tombstone icon is a great idea! Very funny.

Annihilaytorr

Re: Hinge albums
September 18, 2006, 07:06:51 AM
Is Divine Intervention really the hinge album for Slayer? To me that is the album where they become almost unlistenable. While naturally it would be preferable to the entirely interchangeable numetal albums they began selling with Diabolus and continue to repackage every three or four years, it is pretty clear on Seasons in the Abyss the direction Slayer was moving.

Before Seasons, every Slayer album is in some way a development of some particular idea and stands independent from previous albums. Unlike the first four Slayer releases, Seasons shows no musical progression from the preceding work, and obviously lacks its own objective and therefore its own identity, and thus becomes Slayers first normative output. While it is a good album in itself, it is nearly impossible to listen to directly following Hell Awaits.

This is a constantly debated issue, as some point to South of Heaven's slower and more rockish Black Sabbath-spawned hooks as the defining moment for the turning of Slayer, and beyond that some will say the stripped down simplicity of Reign in Blood is where Slayer begins to hinge. There may be truth to either of these positions as well, as nothing Slayer did following Hell Awaits was ever as complete as that, yet RIB and SOH still show continued desire to develop, unlike Seasons, which is in my opinion the first album where Slayer’s impetus is questionable.

Re: Hinge albums
September 18, 2006, 07:59:19 AM
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Is Divine Intervention really the hinge album for Slayer? To me that is the album where they become almost unlistenable. While naturally it would be preferable to the entirely interchangeable numetal albums they began selling with Diabolus and continue to repackage every three or four years, it is pretty clear on Seasons in the Abyss the direction Slayer was moving.

Before Seasons, every Slayer album is in some way a development of some particular idea and stands independent from previous albums. Unlike the first four Slayer releases, Seasons shows no musical progression from the preceding work, and obviously lacks its own objective and therefore its own identity, and thus becomes Slayers first normative output. While it is a good album in itself, it is nearly impossible to listen to directly following Hell Awaits.

This is a constantly debated issue, as some point to South of Heaven's slower and more rockish Black Sabbath-spawned hooks as the defining moment for the turning of Slayer, and beyond that some will say the stripped down simplicity of Reign in Blood is where Slayer begins to hinge. There may be truth to either of these positions as well, as nothing Slayer did following Hell Awaits was ever as complete as that, yet RIB and SOH still show continued desire to develop, unlike Seasons, which is in my opinion the first album where Slayer’s impetus is questionable.


Your argument presents somewhat of a double standard in that the artistic value of Slayer's material is being verified through comparison of the releases that led up to the one in question, with special attention being paid to new or different ideas that had not been employed up until that point; why can't Seasons in the Abyss be looked at as the integration of the styles and techniques they had experimented with on previous releases, as opposed to an effort that simply lacks the input of a singular new approach?

I've always assumed that most people evaluate Seasons... with that in mind, which would account for the polar reception that album tends to receive; an approach in style that is essentially the integration of previous efforts works well in theory as a swan song of sorts, which proponents of the album seem to try to convince themselves that it is.  Naysayers seem to be either put off by the notion of Slayer having the nerve to step back and do something as languid as to contemplate the accomplishments of their career or, somewhat analogous to your argument, realize that the final product does not do justice to the material that it is in a sense paying tribute to.

Re: Hinge albums
September 18, 2006, 03:29:13 PM
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Are you sure about the icon thing, though ? Sure it looks practical but I'm sure in a week I will find it bizarre.


What would be better? I like the idea of having it in the list at the top of each review page so people know when to stop reading.

Sisyphe has been helpful in debugging many of the issues on the Dark Legions Archive after our recent template change, clearing out a decade of excremental antiquated HTML!

Regarding Slayer: truly Seasons in the Abyss might be their hinge album, but I can still listen to it, although I prefer not to. Divine Intervention is where they committed to the course of shit and there was no going back (although I think they could reverse it if they so desired).

For example, Metallica's ...And Penis for All might be compared to Slayer's Seasons in the Anus: both are the technical top of form for these bands, yet a loss of spirit, yet still with some good material. I'm not ditching either album but what followed from both bands was so terrible I couldn't do it.

We might make the same argument for DRI's Thrash Zone but it's moot; what's clear is that by Definition mental AIDS had set in and paralytic, they shat out a waste of an album that is now polluting landfills across America.


Re: Hinge albums
September 22, 2006, 06:16:30 PM
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Actually the biggest issue is the clarity and the visibility of the tool.


Yeah, I thought it was a pile of shit, not a tombstone, when I first saw it. Of course, that works too.

Re: Hinge albums
September 23, 2006, 02:46:17 AM
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What I don't understand is why hinge albums are disapproved of.  It's really after that where the badns should be disowned.


Here's the way I think of it. I had one friend who got hit by a bus, and one who died of a wasting disease (ovarian cancer). I remember the friend who got hit by a bus as he was ten minutes before he got flattened. The person who died of ovarian cancer I remember in her half-rotted-away form, slowly wasting away in a hospital bed.

Every album that gets pressed is going to end up in the landfill and generate certain toxic products as  result of the printing of its booklet and discs. Any album that does not need to be pressed should not be. If the world was deprived of Slayer's "Divine Intervention" and everything after, would we really be worse off? We'd remember Slayer as vital and powerful, not sold out.

I guess this comes down to whether the hinge album for Slayer is "Seasons in the Abyss" or "Divine Intervention."  SITA is OK for infrequent listening but DI is degrading to band and fans.