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Infiltrating Humanism

Infiltrating Humanism
September 29, 2011, 09:33:18 AM
I think that adherents of even the most flawed ideologies must reorient themselves in times of decay by reexamining their values in order to better understand their actual implications. One realization that may come about through this process is that overvaluing a single component of a large system results in it's own undoing.

I stumbled upon an advert for a local humanist society the other day, and was somewhat surprised by it's content. Here are a few of the discussion topics it listed:

Quote from: FLIER
Cognitive biases: How can we make major decisions in life and in the world when our minds have such subtle biases?

Transhumanism: Should we control our own evolution?

Popuation control: We evolved for life on a small scale. How can we live together on a large one?

Species-ism: Should we look out for all sentient life, even to our own detriment?

Anyone else noticing this trend? Seems like humanists are catching onto the fact that putting humans first works for the detriment of the greater whole, humanity included.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
September 29, 2011, 06:15:22 PM
"Maybe humanism wasn't so good after all  x 4"

What exactly is it that humanists stand for (as opposed to the people who aren't humanists)? =/

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
September 29, 2011, 09:06:19 PM
Nowadays it seems to refer to the philanthropic and secular demographic who use it to defend the idea that one need not be religious in order to be "good", often called "secular humanism".

I guess the first step in exploring this would be to track the historical development of the humanistic outlook, and see how compatible any of it's ideologies are with ANUSian thought. Even if they generally aren't, I think that the points made by this advert suggest that they're in a revision process.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
September 29, 2011, 10:05:32 PM

The city of Padua was one of the important early centers of humanistic study. The great figure who did most to give the decisive impulse to these developing tendencies was Francesco Petrarca, or Petrarch (1304-74), who has been called the "father of humanism."

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
September 29, 2011, 10:33:11 PM
** Retreats back to grave **

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
September 30, 2011, 03:36:40 AM

The city of Padua was one of the important early centers of humanistic study. The great figure who did most to give the decisive impulse to these developing tendencies was Francesco Petrarca, or Petrarch (1304-74), who has been called the "father of humanism."

: P


I've heard Nietzsche described as a humanist. I was quite surprised by this o.o

It does seem to be the case that "humanism" is basically "the idea that one need not be religious in order to be "good" ". That would make it both very vague, whilst also being overly restrictive.

This group may well have just termed themselves a Philosophical society.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
September 30, 2011, 06:29:04 AM
Sprezzatura  is an Italian word originating from Baldassare Castiglione’s The Book of the Courtier,  “a certain nonchalance, so as to conceal all art and make whatever one does or says appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it.” It is the ability of the courtier to display “an easy facility in accomplishing difficult actions which hides the conscious effort that went into them.”

Baldassare was also part of this Italian humanism movement. 

As were-

Giovanni Boccaccio, Poggio Bracciolini,  Leonardo Bruni, Aldo Manuzio, Coluccio Salutati , and Lorenzo Valla,

I have mentioned this word sprezzatura. A most interesting concept and look into some of the Italian mind.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
October 02, 2011, 12:29:43 PM
Humanism is simply the celebration of humanity and its works and potential. The problem with humanism is that it assumes we automatically have good potential, so we begin to attach ideology to our acts. Obviously, this has very negative effects in politics.

Secular Humanism is hardly the ringleader. Most humanists don't even ascribe to the title, but they are humanists nonetheless. An antihumanist is merely someone who looks at humanity with skepticism; he recognizes that most humans are not worth his attention. He also realizes that humanity has no moral progress, only survival.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
October 03, 2011, 02:39:10 PM
I see what you mean. I derived my definition from what I see to be the most obvious social manifestation of the humanist ethos: if human nature is good, then the sustaining of human life (whether it be an individual or a specific social division) is a good thing. This is why I associate it with philanthropy.

From what I gather, "secular humanism" focuses on deriving human ethics / reason through the study of philosophy / science rather than faith. I don't think the problem lies in their methods, but rather that human interest seems to be ultimate guiding factor. Antihumanism recognizes that human interest often clouds logical decision making and will ultimately lead to it's own downfall.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
October 03, 2011, 02:55:22 PM
I see what you mean. I derived my definition from what I see to be the most obvious social manifestation of the humanist ethos: if human nature is good, then the sustaining of human life (whether it be an individual or a specific social division) is a good thing. This is why I associate it with philanthropy.

From what I gather, "secular humanism" focuses on deriving human ethics / reason through the study of philosophy / science rather than faith. I don't think the problem lies in their methods, but rather that human interest seems to be ultimate guiding factor. Antihumanism recognizes that human interest often clouds logical decision making and will ultimately lead to it's own downfall.

I would have to say that is correct. Some of the prominent secular humanists are not really delusional. It seems to be the followers who take it far too seriously.

Antihumanism is very natural. The taboo that surrounds it is due to Christianity and politics. Therefore, children are indoctrinated with humanism. For example, "Eat all the food on your plate. There are starving children in Africa." The parents are generally apathetic towards African suffering, but when asked, they deny said apathy. "They are part of the human race." is the general response. They are in denial, and they pass the denial on to their offspring.

Re: Infiltrating Humanism
October 03, 2011, 06:23:13 PM
Philosophical ethics was fundamentally about determining what it is that we should even have as our foundation. The Roman schools for example tended not to focus much on the foundation, but rather on codes for living.

What we have here with secular humanism is something similar. They use methods which basically everyone agrees are useful, but it's the foundation which is important, and they always shy away from putting this in explicit terms, and just -promising- that they are humanist.

idklol