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September 25, 2006, 01:01:30 AM
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Re: The Rebel Sell
September 25, 2006, 02:48:54 AM
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What we see in films like American Beauty and Fight Club is not actually a critique of consumerism; it’s merely a restatement of the “critique of mass society” that has been around since the 1950s. The two are not the same. In fact, the critique of mass society has been one of the most powerful forces driving consumerism for more than 40 years.


That describes pop music in a nutshell. It's different, it's different... it's the same old thing (country music) but with hipster appeal.

Re: The Rebel Sell
September 28, 2006, 05:25:13 PM
Metal has its flaws.

The basic concept of metal, or phrasal narrative melodic composition with Romanticist staging affirming a transcendental, holistic, immanent rationalism based in the objective affirmed by realism in a naturalistic context, is superior to mainstream music.

However, metal too can be taken over by this "rebel sell." The original idea behind rock music was a dual attack of authenticity/otherness that convinced teenagers rock music was "the other side" to the boring suburban lives that awaited them. That got sold out, and ever since, it has been selling itself out from within.

Since 1996, most of metal has been doing the same, dumbing itself down to three chords (not necessarily I-IV-V; more like I-II-III). If this site seems to overpraise certain bands (Summoning, Demoncy, Averse Sefira) it is because they are the few who have transcended this.


Re: The Rebel Sell
September 29, 2006, 01:54:45 PM
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What we see in films like American Beauty and Fight Club is not actually a critique of consumerism; it’s merely a restatement of the “critique of mass society” that has been around since the 1950s. The two are not the same. In fact, the critique of mass society has been one of the most powerful forces driving consumerism for more than 40 years.  


This describes the kvlt underground to a T.
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Re: The Rebel Sell
October 02, 2006, 02:35:13 AM
the revolution is being televised...and sold at amazon et al.

i guess the best bands in these times are those that can bite the hand that feeds and breeds....undermine the sytem fomr the inside..get corporate jobs and then start dismantling the machine....if you are not broken down first....


Re: The Rebel Sell
October 14, 2006, 01:41:44 PM
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This describes the kvlt underground to a T.


I think Metalist's point was that both the kvlt and the mainstream are products, not art, and therefore are insincere in what they do. Only a few artists from both transcend that, and to varying degrees, dependent on audience.


Re: The Rebel Sell
October 21, 2006, 09:52:12 AM
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HLTO is probably the best example of having to 'buy into' something Ihave ever witnessed.  I enjoy it quite a bit, but I feel I could just as easily say he is just playing some fairly rudimentary riffs over long drawn out song structures, in some cases playing the same two notes over and over.  Burzum's mocking simplicity is underlined by it's cult (kvlt) of personality.  Would we really find this music so compelling if it wasn't written by a charismatic arsonist/murdurer?


Yes.  I was enthralled with it the first time I heard it, on a purely musical level, with zero need to "buy into" it as you described.  I'm sure many others had a similar experience.  Your point about his "cult (kvlt) of personality" is taken, but clearly this "cult" was caused in some way by the fact that his music was compelling, and does not overshadow that fact.

Re: The Rebel Sell
October 21, 2006, 10:00:49 AM
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That is your point.  While I agree that 'kvlt' artists are fairly ridiculous in their antics, I think no artist is immune from this sort of criticism.  To me they just seem like different marketing nieches.  Burzum would be the best example of this.
HLTO is probably the best example of having to 'buy into' something Ihave ever witnessed.  I enjoy it quite a bit, but I feel I could just as easily say he is just playing some fairly rudimentary riffs over long drawn out song structures, in some cases playing the same two notes over and over.  Burzum's mocking simplicity is underlined by it's cult (kvlt) of personality.  Would we really find this music so compelling if it wasn't written by a charismatic arsonist/murdurer?


Were he black retard from Congo and still produced Hyvis Lyset Tar Oss(which is probably impossible, but you should get the point) I would appreciate it for what I see it as: excellent neoclassical ambient black metal.

To prevent this from turning into a review of HLTO, I will say: Most metal bands use this technique ("rebel sell") to gain popularity (and kvlt status), while there are still a few exceptions (even today, read : Averse Sefira) who actually use metal as a form of artistic expression...
"What does not kill me makes me stronger"
-Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Re: The Rebel Sell
October 21, 2006, 11:33:38 AM
Good art doesn't need the rebel sell. The point is that if you're buying the CD to be a rebel, you're a tool. You be a rebel by being a rebel, and if you're a rebel without a direction, you're just another modern egomaniac.

HLTO, or even "Legion," don't need the rebel sell. Most metal does. It promises a "different" life without a reason why. The point of the article is that what differentiates "true" "underground" "real" "art" from mainstream entertainment (music to pass the time, a product) is that it has some validity to its viewpoint. Rebellion for the sake of being "different" doesn't and that's why most of these sheep want it in their cheesy, goth-induced, emo-influenced metalcore and shitty three-chord black metal.

Re: The Rebel Sell
October 22, 2006, 05:51:24 PM
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You be a rebel by being a rebel, and if you're a rebel without a direction, you're just another modern egomaniac.


This, I think, is the key distinction.  The Rebel Sell invites you to see that the world as it exists is fucking bullshit, and then invites you to pat yourself on the back for recognizing the obvious.  Genuine art either shows why the world is bullshit at a structural level (providing a point of entry for a solution) or offers a means of doing something about it.

This is why black metal, once it became compromised, devolved into pity me suicide bullshit, good times rock 'n roll or charlatan shit that promises a solution (but really provides nothing of the sort: viz. 'white pride worldwide').

Annihilaytorr

Re: The Rebel Sell
October 22, 2006, 07:12:24 PM
In this over sensitized, over sexed, over marketed society, is it really a surprise that post modernism itself has become a product?

Re: The Rebel Sell
October 24, 2006, 10:10:22 PM
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Genuine art either shows why the world is bullshit at a structural level (providing a point of entry for a solution) or offers a means of doing something about it.


This seems very true. Or if not "doing something about it," it offers an alternate vision of what matters. Art reconnects us to the intangible values (through beauty) in life. Art makes death beautiful and shows us the new birth after the long winter of death. This is why I have no tolerance for rock music, most punk, other protest music and whiny metal bands or candy black metal.