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Music versus Message

Re: Music versus Message
November 17, 2006, 06:03:21 PM
I think of lyrics as just another instrument in the song playing its way out. I dont believe that the message is in either the lyrics or the music i think it is all mixed together within the song to give the song the message. Lyrics are important but just as important as every other instrument in the song.

Re: Music versus Message
November 18, 2006, 01:04:26 PM
Wouldn't vocals be the instrument, and lyrics something people read afterwards?

Re: Music versus Message
November 19, 2006, 02:58:11 PM
but in many songs the actual lyrics said (in genres where the singer is understood) add to the overall sound of a song, if you insistently use the letter S it could be another way for the composer to help express meaning. Or a more conventional way would be to use the English techniques like rhyme or alliteration (as i said before). So its not a bunch of notes that is spewing from the singers mouth but sounds that accompany those notes. After all a song sung with words and then sung again with only AAAA's or OOOOO's would sound very different

Re: Music versus Message
November 19, 2006, 07:35:20 PM
All of the parts of music are interwoven together to complete a cohesive message that we can understand. I talk to a lot of people new to listening to metal, people with or without having studied music often experience the same visualisations or emotions from the same song. Music is a universal way of communicating some pretty deep concepts and feelings.

Re: Music versus Message
November 19, 2006, 07:53:48 PM
Quote
but in many songs the actual lyrics said (in genres where the singer is understood) add to the overall sound of a song, if you insistently use the letter S it could be another way for the composer to help express meaning. Or a more conventional way would be to use the English techniques like rhyme or alliteration (as i said before). So its not a bunch of notes that is spewing from the singers mouth but sounds that accompany those notes. After all a song sung with words and then sung again with only AAAA's or OOOOO's would sound very different


A lot of people try to avoid this fact.  This is all true.  The way you say something can mean just as much as what it is you are saying, and even the pronounciation of syllables can add meaning to things and stir up meaning within others.  People don't like the idea that such a trivial thing could add to the message, but when you think about it, if the difference between major or minor, or even the difference between playing an A or a C matters, then why shouldn't this matter as well.

Others things that can effect meaning include the length of the song, the number of verse, whether it is apparent or not that there are verses.....

Just about anything that veries within a song adds meaning, whether it is intentional or not.

Re: Music versus Message
November 21, 2006, 08:12:13 AM
Music is a holistic idea like philosophy. There is a concept, and no part of life escapes it. If one makes a discovery, it changes how one composes music, whether that discovery is mechanical (relationship of notes) or philosophical (relationship of self to void). The best concepts are those that take on a worldview, which is an aesthetic way of explaining philosophy. Artists like Varg Vikernes, David Stuppnig and Jeff Hanneman do this.

Re: Music versus Message
November 21, 2006, 11:11:59 AM
I dunno about the rest of you, but for me, the music can give me the emotion and depth of the meaning, and then the lyrics apply that to whatever the topic of the song is. Lyrics wouldn't be nearly as meaningful without music, but music without lyrics can't really give you a story or message, just emotion and feeling. Either can be good alone (i.e. poetry or classical instrumental music) but for the most part I like them best when combined.

Re: Music versus Message
November 21, 2006, 12:13:29 PM
so its safe for me to assume everyone on this board seem to have the same opinion. Which seems to be music in itself carries the rough idea or story for the lyrics to take place and the lyrics give the piece a more focused view. am i safe to assume this much

Re: Music versus Message
November 21, 2006, 04:52:26 PM
I feel that lyrics are extremely important to music. Lyrics form movements, and the music further supports the message that is being conveyed. I feel they sit hand in hand with each other, as all musical movements in contemporary music are fueled by different ideologies.

This often leads to the argument of having different themed lyrics within a style of music, example being christianity in metal. It's the exact opposite of what metal stands for, and simply makes the artist look foolish for trying to convey a message that opposes the feel of the music.

Re: Music versus Message
November 22, 2006, 05:32:51 AM
I didn't know death metal had lyrics. I thought it was music designed to emulate an epileptic seizure.

Re: Music versus Message
November 22, 2006, 10:32:28 AM
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I didn't know death metal had lyrics. I thought it was music designed to emulate an epileptic seizure.


well the name death metal wasn't given to it as a gimmick

Re: Music versus Message
November 25, 2006, 03:10:22 PM
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I am aware that very few of my lyrics rhyme. For some reason it doesn't seem necessary and I don't know if that's due to the way I phrase things or not. I always sing the vocal lines first, before writing a single word, by just singing noises that sound like words. That ensures that the flow of the vocal is as it should be for the song. The right amount of syllables, the right notes. Even the right sound for some notes that might be difficult to sing because some sounds are better for certain things than others. For example, with my voice, any word that ends with an 'or' sound is more powerful than something that ends with an 'e' sound. 'For' instead of 'me' for example. Being aware of what phonetic sounds suit my voice in different circumstances guides me in my choice of words for certain parts of a song. A huge anthemic chorus would only have certain words available to me for the final word of each line, other words would sound too weak. That's not so much a style as simply knowing your own strengths and weaknesses. I never have the problem of trying to make a vocal melody fit a pre written lyric, which can give some awkward results, like when you have a word with one syllable and you have four notes to stretch it over. Some people do that all the time and don't seem to care. I think it sucks.


http://www.numan.co.uk/clouds/interview.html

Re: Music versus Message
November 25, 2006, 06:23:21 PM
Quote
Music is a holistic idea like philosophy. There is a concept, and no part of life escapes it. If one makes a discovery, it changes how one composes music, whether that discovery is mechanical (relationship of notes) or philosophical (relationship of self to void). The best concepts are those that take on a worldview, which is an aesthetic way of explaining philosophy. Artists like Varg Vikernes, David Stuppnig and Jeff Hanneman do this.


Metal's greatest strength was in the fact that it was an artform in a long line of the integral tradition--that is to say, it separated itself from the modern, the disjointed, and fragmentary by espousing a coherence which is the staying power of all lasting works of art. In such pieces there are no feelings of lacking conveyed to the listener, precisely because the aesthetic coheres to the ideology, and both act as reflections of that which is eternal.

Re: Music versus Message
January 18, 2016, 03:52:36 AM
this was a point even before or after a genre METAL, no surprise
because the jazz snob is as worthless as the autist when it comes to helping pull a goys head out of his ass