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(Uniquely) American Black Metal

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
January 26, 2007, 01:02:26 PM
no need for corpse paint, already look like a dead charred piece of shit

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
February 06, 2007, 07:47:34 PM
Basketball team or not, Mystifier's vocals are quite impressive.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
February 06, 2007, 08:24:35 PM
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Black Metal is a genre that focuses greatly on misanthropic themes. Recalling our history would be like a gold mine. Subjects could include war (Civil War, Vietnam, Revolutionary, Iraq) anti-religion (Salem witch trials) oppression (Native Americans, Slavery) and so on and so forth. You can have anti-government and anti-capitalist ideas in your music seeing as how many people feel this way through out history. I guess in America patriotic black metal would really question our government. I mean we were created out of succession.


Secession?

Why would black metal bands behave like some idiot punk band, singing about current issues? Black metal attacks the spirit.

In America, that would be the frontier and conquest, and a desire to escape the church, the usurer, the cities, etc.

True American black metal would be based in the rural areas away from the retard population.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 03, 2007, 04:32:42 AM
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Secession?

Why would black metal bands behave like some idiot punk band, singing about current issues? Black metal attacks the spirit.

In America, that would be the frontier and conquest, and a desire to escape the church, the usurer, the cities, etc.

True American black metal would be based in the rural areas away from the retard population.


Agreed. Black Metal CAN address politics, but it's at its finest when it obviates petty issues and deals with problems through poetry.


Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 04, 2007, 10:59:20 AM
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I have wondered myself what a hybrid between American folk or country would sound like with metal. Usually this idea gets translated into redneck blues rock mixed with metal, and what is why Pantera is so popular.


Pantera is popular because of it's importance, skill and heaviness. ANUS constantly bashes this band with little justification as to why, but more and more dogma and stubborness.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 04, 2007, 04:02:16 PM
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Pantera is popular because of it's importance, skill and heaviness. ANUS constantly bashes this band with little justification as to why, but more and more dogma and stubborness.


Do you really need reason to find this band useless?  Would you also like hard and fast reasons why Britney Spears or [insert some other irrelevant act here] are not worth listening to?  It is hardly "dogma and stubborness" to not waste ones time on whining morons incapable of seeing obvious things.  Sorry your feelings have been hurt.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 06, 2007, 12:56:43 AM
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Pantera is popular because of it's importance, skill and heaviness. ANUS constantly bashes this band with little justification as to why, but more and more dogma and stubborness.


Skill is a dime a dozen. Coldplay is skilled, and to some, heavy. What's the point? Pantera is soulless angry crap for one-dimensional thinkers.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 10, 2007, 08:36:07 PM
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Skill is a dime a dozen. Coldplay is skilled, and to some, heavy. What's the point? Pantera is soulless angry crap for one-dimensional thinkers.


Coldplay heavy to some? Are those people Mormons?

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 10, 2007, 10:38:11 PM
"heavy" is such an ill defined term that almost anything could be heavy to someone

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 12, 2007, 05:38:34 AM
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Pantera is popular because of it's importance, skill and heaviness. ANUS constantly bashes this band with little justification as to why, but more and more dogma and stubborness.


Skill is rarely a factor in popularity.

When did 'importance' become defined by Black Sabbath worship, meaningless guitar solos and the willingness to jump styles when it's apparent that there's  more money in speed metal-styled alternative Rock than in glam metal? Pantera was, is, and always will be a money-grubbing operation.

__________________________________________

American Black metal has more reason to compose works based on the desire for a challenge of the body and spirit than European black metal. European Black Metal is about accepting the challenges that the past has offered and reestablishing healthy, creative civilization.

American Black metal can be about finding the limits of a form when applied to a new physical or spiritual terrain.

While European Black metal seeks to create an ideal future though a restoration of an idealized past, Uniquely American Black Metal could address the creation of an ideal future through a communal journey of the physical and the spiritual.




Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 13, 2007, 02:18:25 AM
"Coldplay heavy to some? Are those people Mormons?"

haha! As a former mormon, and still a current Utah resident who has and is still attending the schools here, I can say you are on the right track. Our capital city newspaper called a Linkin Park concert "truly heavy".

A popular soldier blogger Jason Hartley put on his blog his list of the 5 heaviest bands ever:
1. Neurosis
2. Mars Volta
3. Deftones
4. Tool
5. Fear

His justification for this can be read on his blog, scrolling down to the Neurosis Deftones Tool section here: http://jasonchartley.com/index.php?paged=2
I give this not for "enlightenment" but to show the mindset of fairly intelligent people who completely personalize abstract terms. Read if you wish.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
March 21, 2007, 01:53:19 AM
Demoncy and Averse Sefira were the only bands with an American "sound" that didn't suck. Havohej was good too, so was Necrovore, maybe we should add Nuclear Death. Krieg, GBK, Absu and all were pretty generic by my view.

TC

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
May 02, 2007, 12:16:50 PM
at least people with talent are exploring some of the ideas brought forth in this thread earlier:

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TOMAHAWK: More 'Anonymous' Details Revealed

TOMAHAWK, the "all-star" band featuring former FAITH NO MORE vocalist Mike Patton, ex-HELMET drummer Jon Stainer and former JESUS LIZARD guitarist Duane Denison, has revealed the track listing for its new album, "Anonymous", due on June 19 via Ipecac. It is as follows:

01. War Song
02. Mescal Rite I
03. Ghost Dance
04. Red Fox
05. Cradle Song
06. Antelope Ceremony
07. Song of Victory
08. Omaha Dance
09. Sun Dance
10. Mescal Rite 2
11. Totem
12. Crow Dance
13. Long, Long Weary Day

TOMAHAWK's third release, "Anonymous", links the outfit with the Native American culture that bore its name. A thirteen-track album that reverentially explores and reinterprets the darker, more recessed ancestral music created by North America's indigenous people, the title reflects the countless individuals who contributed to these songs but went un-credited throughout history.

At the turn of the millennium, Duane Denison toured with HANK WILLIAMS III, frequently finding himself on Indian reservations. "I was somewhat disappointed by the Native bands," Duane explains. "They were usually very conventional, kind of blues and country type stuff, or too much like 'new age' music. I figured there must be native music somewhere that was more aggressive, spookier, and more kinetic." Duane began to research the culture's music; about a year into his research he found books that were written around the time of Teddy Roosevelt's presidency, a period in U.S. history when Indian culture and artifacts were in vogue. The books, dated to the early 20th century, recorded transcriptions of the songs contained herein. The titles "Totem", "Mescal Rite 1", "Song of Victory" are all true to the names uncovered by the people who originally transcribed them, although Duane says "Red Fox" was altered to be more accessible. One song, "Long, Long Weary Day", is a non-Native American "parlor song" song of the same time period, and also uncredited.

Now a three-piece, TOMAHAWK recorded "Anonymous" in two-parts. Duane Denison and John Stanier recorded guitars and drums (respectively) in Nashville while Mike Patton added vocals and samples at Vulcan Studios in San Francisco.

Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
May 02, 2007, 01:43:51 PM
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"heavy" is such an ill defined term that almost anything could be heavy to someone


Linguistic trap: anything can be anything to someone. Proof: crazy or stupid people who are totally delusional.


Re: (Uniquely) American Black Metal
May 04, 2007, 03:53:12 AM
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Linguistic trap: anything can be anything to someone. Proof: crazy or stupid people who are totally delusional.



while that is true, when someone says dark music it cuts out a large part of the musical spectrum no matter who you are talking to because it the word is much more defined then heavy.