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Protestant work ethic

Protestant work ethic
May 14, 2012, 01:45:32 PM
In The 20% Doctrine, Tate explores how tinkering, goofing off, and breaking the rules at work can drive success in business. If you're lucky, your boss may someday find Tate's book in his or her conference schwag bag and be inspired enough by the tales of skunkworks projects at both tech (Google, Flickr, pre-Scott Thompson Yahoo) and non-tech (Bronx Academy of Letters, Huffington Post, Thomas Keller Restaurant Group) organizations to officially condone some form of 20% time at your place of work.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/12/05/13/2134237/goofing-off-to-get-ahead

Re: Protestant work ethic
May 14, 2012, 04:32:23 PM
Companies spend billions on rent, offices, and office equipment so their employees will have a great place to work.

However, when you ask people where they go when they really need to get something done, you'll rarely hear them say it's the office.

If you ask, you'll usually get one of three kinds of responses: A place, a moving object, or a time.

{snip}

I don't blame people for not wanting to be at the office. I blame the office. The modern office has become an interruption factory. You can't get work done at work anymore.

When people walk into the office, they trade their work day in for a series of work moments. It's like the front door is a "time Cuisinart" -- shredding it all into little bits.

When you're in the office you're lucky to have 30 minutes to yourself. Usually you get in, there's a meeting, then there's a call, then someone calls you over to their desk, or your manager comes over to see what you're doing. These interruptions chunk your day into smaller and smaller bits. Fifteen minutes here, 30 minutes there, another 15 minutes before lunch, then an afternoon meeting, etc. When are you supposed to get work done if you don't have any time to work?

People -- especially creative people -- need long stretches of uninterrupted time to get things done. Fifteen minutes isn't enough. Thirty minutes isn't enough. Even an hour isn't enough.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/OPINION/12/05/fried.office.work/index.html