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Anu, and refusing to evolve Black Metal beyond its capability.

At the long anticipated Martyrdoom fest that happened this past weekend, a few cohorts and I were pleasantly surprised to catch this act alongside the bludgeoning slew of non-stop Death Metal outfits with overlapping sets. I thought there was something so very pure about this band. Every "new" Black Metal act seems to be scrambling to try and reinvent the genre and breathe new life into it, whereas I think Anu realized that there's no need for this. Anu's biggest criticism from people seems to be "Oh well there's nothing really innovative about it" - well, that's exactly what entranced me about their live set. There was nothing innovative about it, at all.

What Anu was, was well written, simple and straight forward Black Metal in the vein of the Norwegian legacy via 1991-1996. There was nothing wrong with that. Nothing at all. In fact, in their refusal to try and "innovate" anything, I think this band stumbled upon something ingenious- the key isn't in trying something new, the solution to the current Black Metal problem is writing better Black Metal.

This probably wouldn't work for every band, and with enough of this, we'll have an oversaturation of this type of thing, but for this particular band, I think it works very well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfCMzlyJ5XU&feature=relmfu

He's based in North Carolina from what I remember. One of the rare overlooked musicians of some worth which in a sense is probably just as well.

Surprisingly I listened to the Full-Length on repeat about six times yesterday. There's a really cool divide between the Black Metal and the ambient examples that comprise the CD. Definitely adept in both styles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UaLqqOqji2Q&feature=relmfu

My full support to these guys, as this is the most motivating stuff I've heard in such a long time. I'd like to see more from this outfit, and apparently there's a new album and preorders are being taken.

http://www.gsr666.com/

Not familiar with this band specifically, but agree with your point in general.  Metal is the last place where you really have to know your predecessors and the tradition that you are a part of.  There's just no faking it.

I often ponder over this myself. But I still think the future of metal isn't a question of innovation vs tradition (or non-innovation?). Both directions have the potential to either succeed or fail. But what matters is function. As when a person speaks to another person: do they really have something to say? and do they mean it?

Looking at a band like Beherit, their legacy will go beyond such definitions, as they don't look forward or back, their music is ultra-simplistic and yet it moves worlds. Necessity is at the core of function.

I often ponder over this myself. But I still think the future of metal isn't a question of innovation vs tradition (or non-innovation?). Both directions have the potential to either succeed or fail. But what matters is function. As when a person speaks to another person: do they really have something to say? and do they mean it?

Looking at a band like Beherit, their legacy will go beyond such definitions, as they don't look forward or back, their music is ultra-simplistic and yet it moves worlds. Necessity is at the core of function.

Probably my favorite ANUS/DeathMetal.org moment.

Every "new" Black Metal act seems to be scrambling to try and reinvent the genre and breathe new life into it, whereas I think Anu realized that there's no need for this. Anu's biggest criticism from people seems to be "Oh well there's nothing really innovative about it" - well, that's exactly what entranced me about their live set. There was nothing innovative about it, at all.


I tend to disagree with this. There's a veritable legion of Black Metal bands who do nothing new and pride themselves for it, they're even marketed for it. I have no idea as to the band in questions quality, but being "nothing new" is nothing new. I for one WOULD like to see Black Metal expand, no not by adding in a fuckton of various incompatible genres or the destruction and dissection of its spirit, but by bringing its complexity and evocative power even closer to classical music while keeping its spirit and warlike assertion intact.


Anu's debut album is like a fusion of Darkthrone, "Within the Sylvan Realms..." - era Demoncy, and Brian Eno's "Apollo".

While Faustian makes a good point about "nothing new" being (ironically) nothing new, I think it becomes evident, when analyzing the actions that an artist takes, what their motivations are. I too was at Martyrdoom along with Nightspirit, and Anu's general presentation was simple and direct. They made no announcements, played their set, and just let the audience absorb what they were doing. It may be a bit cliched but it's a welcoming change from bullshit like Liturgy which has to constantly announce its intent so people know, because the music sucks too much and doesn't express the intent.

I do also ponder what Faustian's definition of expanded Black metal would sound like. Have you ever heard Pensees Nocturnes? They take a very classical inspired approach to black metal. Perhaps this is what you speak of?

Humans haven't changed since they quit roaming and began settling. Despite all of the liberal democratic outbursts against it lately, caste remains with us at all levels of organization, even in metal.

  • pioneers
  • maintainers
  • hipsters
  • fodder

The fodder, formerly chattel or thrall caste, are servicing the hipster so this pressures the higher castes to follow the lead of the lower caste hipster in order to get adequate support. Honor goes to they who can resist the downward entropic pull or even rise against it. Best of all is to enslave the fodder and exterminate hipsterdom.