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Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.

Re: Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.
January 14, 2007, 12:45:16 PM
no im not referring to a leitmotif because Wagner was the first person to use it, hence if you studied Bach you would not come across (especially since he didn't write operas)

im assuming it is a new term but i (and my teacher) have only ever encountered the term while looking at Bach (although i think my teacher said there was a romantic composer who use this as well)

well my contemporary music teacher says unless your study Bach we will call it motif in this class

But as you said onto enslaved, i consider it a much softer and more easily accessible album compared to older works

it keeps the frantic pace and chromatic riffing as seen on tracks on frost but seems to lose any real power behind them that they captured on the previous album

the riffing almost sounds like half baked death metal
but has a strong taste of frost, the only thing is the black metal and death metal sides of it seem to conflict making (for me at least) an unpleasant listening

Re: Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.
January 15, 2007, 07:35:01 PM
Glad I got some responses...


" Face it, this band died after they became police informers and got boring and "respectable." Christianity comes in many forms. "

That has nothing to do with their talent and ability to make great music.  albeit you think the album sucks anyway... How does becoming "respectable" detract from an album? What does it have to do with anything for that matter?


" Strange that of all their albums it is Eld (the one that did away with the ad nauseum looped melodies) is the one singled out as "carnival music".  


 I completely agree...  Personally, 739 on Eld is an amazing song, so much better than the first song on Vikingligr.



Just because this album is more "accessible" and "softer" doesn't make "Eld one of the reasons why people think metal sucks".

Azazel

Re: Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.
January 15, 2007, 07:42:27 PM
Quote
Glad I got some responses...


 " Face it, this band died after they became police informers and got boring and "respectable." Christianity comes in many forms. "

 That has nothing to do with their talent and ability to make great music.  albeit you think the album sucks anyway... How does becoming "respectable" detract from an album? What does it have to do with anything for that matter?


" Strange that of all their albums it is Eld (the one that did away with the ad nauseum looped melodies) is the one singled out as "carnival music".  


  I completely agree...  Personally, 739 on Eld is an amazing song, so much better than the first song on Vikingligr.



Just because this album is more "accessible" and "softer" doesn't make "Eld one of the reasons why people think metal sucks".


And you need to go take a few music lessons.

Re: Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.
January 16, 2007, 09:38:52 AM
Quote
That has nothing to do with their talent and ability to make great music.  albeit you think the album sucks anyway... How does becoming "respectable" detract from an album? What does it have to do with anything for that matter?


People who follow weak philosophies make weak music. What's the philosophy behind Britney Spears?


Re: Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.
January 17, 2007, 06:45:37 AM
RE: motif vs. motive

Interestingly enough, I have at various times quizzed several of my music instructors on this very subject (one of whom has a great degree of training and experience in classical music's relation to European languages/cultures/histories/etc.), and all of them seem to agree that there is no distinction between the two terms aside from the fact that “motif” is originally a French term whereas “motive” originates in English.

To me it seems likely that Bach is but one of a (very) few individuals that held a differing denotation of the two terms, and thus, is more of an exception to the general rule than an establisher of a new rule.

Re: Enslaved - Eld ...Some thoughts.
January 17, 2007, 07:21:23 PM
Quote
RE: motif vs. motive

Interestingly enough, I have at various times quizzed several of my music instructors on this very subject (one of whom has a great degree of training and experience in classical music's relation to European languages/cultures/histories/etc.), and all of them seem to agree that there is no distinction between the two terms aside from the fact that “motif” is originally a French term whereas “motive” originates in English.

To me it seems likely that Bach is but one of a (very) few individuals that held a differing denotation of the two terms, and thus, is more of an exception to the general rule than an establisher of a new rule.


i would be happy to agree with such a compromise