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Emotional intelligence

Emotional intelligence
August 13, 2012, 12:51:08 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_quotient

Does it have any merit?

Once you establish an understanding of the value of a baseline level of intelligence, is emotional stability and functionality not the next thing that comes to mind?
This would exlude high IQ yet emotionally inept as well as over-emotional types.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 13, 2012, 02:45:51 AM
I wonder if you have it backwards.


Is someone with emotional maturity (or EQ, as described by that article) and an average IQ more likely productive and capable than a guy with an IQ of 127 who has an inability to cope with stress, or other emotional problem?

My relatively limited experience tells me the answer is yes.


Re: Emotional intelligence
August 13, 2012, 06:08:21 PM
Attrition from the dysfunction of moron hordes causes many of the brights to crack. EQ is a failed attempt to excuse our poor social-political value of radical tolerance because it shifts the blame from the causal to the affected.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 13, 2012, 11:06:34 PM
Attrition from the dysfunction of moron hordes causes many of the brights to crack. EQ is a failed attempt to excuse our poor social-political value of radical tolerance because it shifts the blame from the causal to the affected.

It exploits the popular anti-intellectual misconception that smart people by definition are more detached from emotions, a stereotype that has existed for centuries.

Most of the above 120 IQ's I've met in my life were sensitive people yet somewhat socially awkward. Most of the low IQ's I've met were also emotional but usually unable to control their emotions so they had a tendency to become hostile and aggressive. So imo IQ and the way we deal with emotions are already related. Obviously culture plays a very big role too, so in a way EQ tests are cultural discrimination.

NHA

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 14, 2012, 02:35:33 AM
As far as i can tell all it does is measure your understanding of social context and what is considered acceptable behavior within it. It just doesn't seem to have anything to do with emotion at all.

Machiavellian personality types should be able to arbitrarily decide whatever result they want to get on the test.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 14, 2012, 03:13:12 AM
It has no merit, it is completely worthless. The wikipedia article itself presents all the points needed to damn it.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 15, 2012, 10:14:22 AM
So the general consensus is that so called EQ is a diversion from the real issue; low IQ on mass (or at the very least, that the two frameworks are somewhat incompatible). I became interested in this after thinking that IQ alone couldn’t accurately define a healthy, functional person in that it couldn’t account for things like courage, practical skills, artistic creativity, or other necessary characteristics. Am I missing something or is IQ a component part of a more holistic approach?

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 15, 2012, 12:52:12 PM
Emotional quotient isn't maturity, character or applied ability either.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 15, 2012, 04:07:38 PM
There is simply no measure for say, wisdom aquarius. IQ is crystallized potential.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 16, 2012, 07:37:09 PM
Sober psychologist differentiate between two kinds of MEASUREABLE intelligence, and belive there only are the two :

* Culture fair fluid G

* Culture loaded crystallized G


When Mensa changed to test CFFG 3/4 of the members could not pass.

I think test like the Mega and Titan -test better measure real intelligence : Can a man hold a complex question in his head, or can he only solve easy problems fast. Well, he should also be able to write poetry.


Re: Emotional intelligence
August 17, 2012, 02:10:30 AM
Wisdom is the result of putting aside intellect, as if intellect was some ultimate quality.
Of course, some degree of intellect is probably important in the gaining of wisdom.
Maybe there's something beyond wisdom that puts wisdom in the shade.
I don't worry much about that.
Squawk!

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 18, 2012, 01:19:26 AM
In other words, wisdom doesn't stem directly from intelligence but it also isn't possible without it? I just felt depressed after finding that most people, regardless of intellect, mimic their emotional spectrum from hollywood movies, and thought there must be a more comprehensive valuation of the person than IQ alone.

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 18, 2012, 03:18:52 AM
Most people know so little about themselves and what makes them go, that there isn't much for you to discover. It's mostly a bluffing game.
I spent many years thinking other people had their act together, and I alone didn't.
What a dope.
But it was a great incentive to delve ever more deeply into what made me go.
And I suppose it takes a certain intellect to do that.
But there is a point at which one discovers that suspending the intellect yields astonishing results.
Knowledge at one's fingertips, whenever one needs it, without any thinking, searching, asking, learning.
Life suddenly gets easy, and clear. Yet pervaded with mystery, at the same time.
Wisdom.
What is it?
One probably has to have it, to know.
Squawk!

Re: Emotional intelligence
August 18, 2012, 04:04:02 AM
Most people know so little about themselves and what makes them go, that there isn't much for you to discover. It's mostly a bluffing game.

I find this is true but that is the trade off with unnecessary excesses of affluence, managerial dependency, and layers of conflict mitigation. We remain childish long after adolescence was supposed to have passed into the adult stages.

There is little in the way of adversity, seriousness and reverence in our type of society. It is a liberal, trite and foolish way of life, hence its gradually unraveling into such a state that we will either come to confront some wising up or we will suffer for our willful negligence.