Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Slow collapse is fine

Slow collapse is fine
October 23, 2012, 01:38:28 AM
The old system is well into its death and decay. New system growth has begun to replace it. At this point it is a huge mass of rot. We still have to search around for the little sprouts of life just beginning.

Quote
Itís a systemic crisis.   The systems we rely upon arenít viable.

They havenít been for a long time.  Every year we are worse off than the year before.

A political fix, switch, or reform isnít going to do the job.

Quote
Why do I think this is good news?  Two reasons.

Firstly, many people are finally waking up to the fact that the old system isnít viable anymore, and we need to create a new one.  A system that actually produces a real opportunity to pursue happiness and not the illusion of one.

Secondly, this creeping crisis hasnít consumed all of our resources yet.  Weíve been damaged, sure.  But we still have the flexibility to make some strides towards something new.  Something we can have a say in building.

http://www.resilientcommunities.com/were-in-a-slow-motion-collapse-take-advantage-of-the-time-available/

I'm going from a collapsing Mayberry mostly formed of the old system to a real Mayberry that never adopted much of the old system, within a year. There isn't so much an open and closed window in which to do so, but it is the realization of our moving from an optimal to less optimal state to get better positioned as the months pass.

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 23, 2012, 02:12:32 AM
Slow collapse is as good as it's likely to get.
Painful to witness, but probably a blessing in disguise.
Young yahoos imagine a Mad Max scenario, but thank God that's not the case, or at least, not yet.
There's still time to adapt.

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 27, 2012, 01:35:30 AM
Sometimes I think time moves in waves and we must swim against it gently or it will drown us.
Other times I think this is our excuse for being weak swimmers.


Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 27, 2012, 02:08:16 AM
Young yahoos imagine a Mad Max scenario, but thank God that's not the case
YOU FUCKING QUEER, I WANT TOTAL DESTRUCTION, EAT MY POOP, GOBBLE MY FECES, ASDFADSFOIJADFSADOJSFzadsfv wrsa gf aer mnjmnj88kumij

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 27, 2012, 03:24:04 AM
Young yahoos imagine a Mad Max scenario, but thank God that's not the case
YOU FUCKING QUEER, I WANT TOTAL DESTRUCTION, EAT MY POOP, GOBBLE MY FECES, ASDFADSFOIJADFSADOJSFzadsfv wrsa gf aer mnjmnj88kumij

I didn't know you played in Black Witchery.

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 27, 2012, 06:11:05 AM
Slow collapse has its moments.
I have a mature Red Cedar that grows at a forty degree angle.
Two thirds up, it lays horizontal for about eight feet, then resumes at forty degrees.
It is about a hundred thirty feet tall, and must weigh several tons.

I spend considerable time pondering the nature of this tree, and projecting its future.
Raccoons lie on the horizontal bit. They don't seem concerned with its imminent collapse.
Probably its collapse is not nearly as imminent as it appears.
It has stood this way, to my certain knowledge, for at least eighty years.

Appearances can be deceptive.

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 27, 2012, 08:55:31 PM
Slow collapse has its moments.
I have a mature Red Cedar that grows at a forty degree angle.
Two thirds up, it lays horizontal for about eight feet, then resumes at forty degrees.
It is about a hundred thirty feet tall, and must weigh several tons.

I spend considerable time pondering the nature of this tree, and projecting its future.
Raccoons lie on the horizontal bit. They don't seem concerned with its imminent collapse.
Probably its collapse is not nearly as imminent as it appears.
It has stood this way, to my certain knowledge, for at least eighty years.

Appearances can be deceptive.

If it doesn`t collapse itself, then it needs some other forces to help it collapse.

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 27, 2012, 11:01:22 PM
Well I have this big chainsaw, see?
But why would I collapse it?
I hasten the collapse of nothing, but maybe leftism.
Would that I could hack that fucker down and burn it for heat.

Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 28, 2012, 01:36:09 AM
Quote
Different Kinds of ends may be upon us, an end of history or the ďend of ideologyĒ that social democrats of the 1960s maintained was then taking place. Less certain is whether any of these predicted ends will favour recognizable self-government or nonauthorized political debate. A managed therapeutic politics will not likely engender either of these conditions. Still, there is no reason to assume that such controls will prove intolerable. People may soon forget older [non-pluralist] liberal and democratic legacies in a thoroughly administered society that brings material security together with the assurance of psychic normality. This social planning will also attract the idealistic, at least those interested in combating newly discovered prejudice and instilling sensitive behaviour. Moral crusades will not be lacking in such an arranged therapeutic future.
   The consolidation of the managerial state and the imposition of its pluralist ideology have been the defining features of contemporary Western life. These trends may continue into the distant future and result in a more solidified international managerial order. But that order may confront obstacles, now only partly glimpsed that will bring about disintegration and ultimately contribute to a new political configuration. Decentralizing, populist protest movements may yet overtake pluralist administration and undo the work of generations of social planners. If that happens, as unlikely as it now seems, Schmittís quest for a political order to replace the Western system of national states will re-emerge as an unfinished task. Paul Gottfried, After Liberalism



Re: Slow collapse is fine
October 28, 2012, 03:30:11 AM
There aren't enough watts and calories that can be collected each hour (or whatever timeframe) to get solely dedicated into all of this total global management. If energy doesn't make it into the necessities like food, transport, lights, heating, etc. people are going to forget the therapeutic pluralist order.

So, the order will always be taking a gargantuan slice of watts and calories for its great society that could have gone instead to a surplus of practical things people need to live. Instead, shortages are showing up frequently, but mostly funneled into currency devaluations - all of them. Leviathan is in competition with the masses to feed its bloated institutional self.

This relationship is failing right now exactly because of the finitude not necessarily of energy yet but of our ability to collect enough to support both practical demands and an unrealistic ideal in a common time and place.