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Metal: a different technicality

Re: Metal: a different technicality
February 22, 2007, 12:07:29 AM
You misunderstand what I meant. But i guess it's my fault for being vague. I just don't know the words to explain what I mean. I mean something along the lines of that timing is more important than skill with instrument. Maybe somebody can understand what I mean.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
February 23, 2007, 10:15:46 PM
I think he is trying to say that there are enough parts that no one instrument receives the main focus for an entire song.  You can get a very technical feel from 100 different instruments playing fairly simple things, as long as they're all well written and in time.  With 4 instruments, each person must constantly be bending people's minds with their instrument alone.  I'm pretty sure I understood that correctly.

Nile577

Re: Metal: a different technicality
February 24, 2007, 06:10:55 AM
Quote
metal musicians are definately more skilled. in classical music, it's all abotu how complicated the song is. that's why only the conductors get recognition in classical music.


You speak madness.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
February 26, 2007, 11:53:38 PM
Classical music is the height of technicality but it's also at its best the most amazing music, not just musically but artistically, the spirit of it. I don't think you can compare metal and classical except that they're composed similarly and have a similar spirit. Even classical guitar is improvised a billion times better than the best rock, jazz and progressive have to offer.

But metal is non-trivial to create and to play. For how simple it is, it isn't predictable like rock, and there are many subtleties that your average musician cannot accomplish. Dave Matthews playing Beherit would be a laugh-fest.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 02, 2007, 08:37:06 PM
Relapse understood what i was trying to say. @Snoopdawg: I wasn't refering to classical music as not being technical, but i was referring to the individual parts played by the individuals. The individual players don't have to be very skilled as the parts they play in the music is generally somewhat easy. Although classical muscians can be very talented and skilled with their instruments, generally they're not. From personal experience in playing classical music, pretty much anyone playing their instruments for four or five years can pick any piece of classical music and play it nearly perfectly the first time they see it.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 02, 2007, 08:46:20 PM
Quote
Although classical muscians can be very talented and skilled with their instruments, generally they're not.


This has to be the "you must be joking" quote of the day.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 02, 2007, 08:59:18 PM
I have been misunderstood yet again. They have to know what they're doing and be able to play they're instruments well, but they're level of skill does not have to be extremely high as all BM/DM musicians have to be. As I've said, I've played classical music, and the hardest part is keeping time and not losing your place. Having a good musical ear is important too. You have to be able to hear what is going which is hard because of all the thigns going on at once in a song. I'm just saying that there's not really that much skill per se needed to play classical music, but you do need other things which probably musicians of other genres don't have.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 03, 2007, 12:15:18 AM
Sorry, I'm not trying to rag on you (and obviously, I took that a bit out of context).  Reading over this thread again, I think the quote in the first post is a nice summary.

Nile577

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 03, 2007, 02:09:23 AM
Quote
I have been misunderstood yet again. They have to know what they're doing and be able to play they're instruments well, but they're level of skill does not have to be extremely high as all BM/DM musicians have to be. As I've said, I've played classical music, and the hardest part is keeping time and not losing your place. Having a good musical ear is important too. You have to be able to hear what is going which is hard because of all the thigns going on at once in a song. I'm just saying that there's not really that much skill per se needed to play classical music, but you do need other things which probably musicians of other genres don't have.


I understood perfectly, and what you say is insane. Electric guitar in Metal has nearly no dynamics. You are guaranteed a distorted note by simply striking the string.  A three note tuba phrase buried in symphony, on the contrary, requires a sublime understanding of dynamics, of technique, of timbre and of pitch.

To play in a symphony orchestra with anything less than years of 10 hour-a-day practice is unthinkable.

To compare the skill of, say, the Obituary guitarist with the second violinist in the LSO is absurd and hilarious.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 05, 2007, 11:52:21 PM
I think we can make a compromise. They're difficult for different reasons. Guitar is a complicated instrument. You have to be constantly moving both hands, both hands move at different times, etc. Instruments like clarinet or flute are very simple and therefore easy to play. Not only this, much metal is extremely fast. So you can say individual metal artists play better than individual classical musicians, but in a large group, metal musicians don't even compare.

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 06, 2007, 07:23:38 AM
i still agree with the orginal poster that its more difficult to play the organic morphing powerful yet individualistic music that most good metal bands do put out.....................

i listen to a lotta eastren classical (indian and paksitani) and its closer to the this morphing idleogy that whci connnects your mind to your heart to your luings to your fingers to your soul ........

good music dont need transcribing

and as for the precision of classical players ...its a disciplinary excercise like the army..practice makes perfect..but gimme soul and feel and  and a morphing primal rhtym over pompous discilinary excercises...its alos the reason why the solos sound like the bets thing in a symphony since its a like a bird trying to soar outta cage

Big Black vs Beethoven ///

no contest

Re: Metal: a different technicality
March 07, 2007, 02:34:37 AM
because of your broken English i may have misunderstood what you said was playing and performing classical pieces (notable those of larger ensembles) requires great patience and practice but they cannot make soulful music, i heartily disagree with this, i think the most empowering, the most depressing, the most exciting music comes from the romantic period, i would think it a grave mistake to say classical musicians have no soul in music

but again this is me thinking that is what suleiman said