Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Greek Literature

Greek Literature
November 28, 2012, 04:57:41 PM
The Iliad never ended. Maybe I read an abridged volume, though many parts of the Homeric epics have been lost. Sophocles had his play about Ajax, so there must be much more text about Troy even if it is faithful fan-fiction.

What are good sources for a more complete narrative of Troy? I am particularly interested in the Death of Achilles.

Re: Greek Literature
November 29, 2012, 04:30:48 AM
I believe the Aeneid is a continuation of the story... the Trojans go on to found Rome basically.  Herodotus also has some sections about it in the early books of his "Histories." 

Re: Greek Literature
November 29, 2012, 12:13:00 PM
Are you sure? Herodotus wrote his world histories in the 5. Century BC.

Re: Greek Literature
November 30, 2012, 05:35:59 AM
Are you sure? Herodotus wrote his world histories in the 5. Century BC.
I am certain.  IIRC he gives background information as to why the Acheans launched the expedition in the first place.  Its involved in setting the scene and establishing the historical enmity of Greece and Persia before his central description of the war between Persian Empire and Greece that Herodotus was writing about (and which ended before he composed the book).
Also, Alexander the Great visited Troy before setting out on his conquest of the Persian Empire.  He supposedly found a shield there that supposedly belonged to Achilles, who he considered to be his ancestor, that helped save his life in India.
I do know that the Iliad is mentioned frequently in various other Greek and Roman writings, although I cannot think of them without consulting my library.  I figure that you can probably put some of your own work in on that, as Greek literature is pretty entertaining and interesting in its own right the Trojan war notwithstanding.  I'd suggest reading Xenophon's book about Socrates to see a much different person than Plato captures in his pages.  Tacitus also is good, writing about the ancient Celts in Britain as well as the Germans living on the east side of the Rhine.  I've seen those books of Tacitus quoted on these forums several times in connexion to black-metal, etc.  Enjoy.

Re: Greek Literature
November 30, 2012, 11:01:17 AM
That's great if he did! Though I didn't remember Herodotus mentioning Rome.
The ancient authors are wonderful to read, though we must be rather sceptical about various things. Tacitus,f.e., probably never  travellled north of the Limes himself, but rely solely on accounts of others. Actual trade with the germans were reserved for the nabouring tribes, so how many people actually travelled far to the north during this time?

I found The Clouds rather boring. Though it's thougth provoking to know how a guy like Socrates was a subjcet of ridicule and scorn during his time, though he was the great master to teach all of the world about the truth.

Re: Greek Literature
December 01, 2012, 09:05:05 PM
No, Herodotus obviously never mentions Rome in his writings, and I never meant to imply that he did.  Merely that he wrote some material pertaining to the back-history of the Trojan War.  The Aeneid concerns the connexion between Rome and Troy.

Re: Greek Literature
December 03, 2012, 02:14:30 AM
I've got a copy of The Iliad and The Odyssey of Homer on my bookshelf. And will hopefully get around to reading them one day. It's just that I can't read very fast and already have about 20 other books on my 'to read before I die' list.