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Ethnomusicology

Ethnomusicology
December 27, 2012, 05:36:58 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnomusicology

Each ethnic group has its own distinct sound in music. Peoples and their cultures have evolved in certain ways, and the music they create is highly shaped by that.

This is most obvious in classical and folk music, but modern genres like death metal and industrial also have organic links to the peoples that created them. 

Black metal, for example, is a genre that seems very emotionally linked to the cold darkness and freezing winter climate of Scandinavia and the Baltic Sea, and the genre has been especially practiced by bands from these places. Take the early BM musicians in Norway - very few of these amateurs were actually influenced by their own traditional music, yet they still somehow expressed the gloomy Nordic "folk-soul" through their metal sounds. An example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tccZs_veliA

The same can be said about classical composers like Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov, btw, who expressed that unique "Russian spirit" in their (highly Western-inspired) music far better than the myriads of other Russian composers who tried the same by copy-pasting Slavic folk tunes into their works.

Also, this part is from this site's "History" section:

Quote
The Celtic folksongs of Ireland and Scotland had two main influences: the pentatonic drone music of the Basque-Semitic “natives” of the UK, namely the diverse groups forming “Picts,” and the Indo-European traditional music which is continued in India today.

I found this passage really interesting. Are there any examples of pure Indo-European traditional music that are spread all the way into Europe? Do we have any recordings of European and Indian folk music that show striking similarities to each other? Any links to mp3s or youtube vids?

Re: Ethnomusicology
December 28, 2012, 12:06:59 PM
Honestly, I've been trying to look up this same link ever since I encountered that excerpt from the History section. All I managed to find were a handful of celtic music artists who had incorporated elements of Indian Classical (which also includes folk music translated into Ragas, e.g. Raga Pahari which was developed from the folk songs of mountainous regions of the subcontinent), particularly Chinmaya Dunsters "Celtic Ragas" which I thought was an abhorrent piece of shit. While I'm comfortably familiar with indian classical and the folk music of the northern regions, I have 0 familiarity with european folk music so I can't comment on similarities in general.

Re: Ethnomusicology
December 28, 2012, 12:39:06 PM
Honestly, I've been trying to look up this same link ever since I encountered that excerpt from the History section. All I managed to find were a handful of celtic music artists who had incorporated elements of Indian Classical

Yeah, I haven't found anything either. This is, after all, why I started this thread. It'd be really interesting to see European folk music that parallels Indian songs - and no, it doesn't count when modern neo-folk artists are consciously incorporating Indian elements into their music. 

I suppose one should look for folk songs in places like Lithuania, since it's the most archaic Indo-European culture in Europe (a language that resembles Sanskrit, didn't convert to Christianity until the late middle ages, have very archaic pagan customs even today). But I'm not really familiar with Lithuanian folk music at all, so someone else would have to answer that.