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What is black metal, as art?

Re: What is black metal, as art?
November 24, 2004, 05:11:38 AM
Black Metal should be freedom, perception and progression. But that all got confused with tradition.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
December 01, 2004, 02:33:35 PM
I don't trust that word "freedom," I think what you mean is liberation from crowd mind-control. But used as itself, "freedom" sounds like "heaven," a word with such a big definition scope it means nothing. Black metal as I saw it was a romantic movement, it was about personal meaning and the continuation of the past, tradition and things that aren't transient like plastic crap, entertainment and modern governments.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 08, 2006, 08:21:41 PM
I think he means moral freedom, e.g. independence from crowd control.


Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 11, 2006, 10:25:12 AM
I would argue that black metal (or at least, the black metal worth discussing seriously) is centered on the expression of reconstructive nihilism (that is, a nihilism that posits a way beyond the current order).  This, I think is the key divergence from death metal, which was concerned with a sort of 'postmodern' nihilism that was fundamentally deconstructive.  Death metal focused on, well, death.  Black metal seeks rebirth.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 16, 2006, 04:47:36 PM
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I would argue that black metal (or at least, the black metal worth discussing seriously) is centered on the expression of reconstructive nihilism (that is, a nihilism that posits a way beyond the current order).  This, I think is the key divergence from death metal, which was concerned with a sort of 'postmodern' nihilism that was fundamentally deconstructive.  Death metal focused on, well, death.  Black metal seeks rebirth.



Sounds like anus.com's brand of nihilism. Where most nihilism is existential, or people worrying about meaning in their own lives, anus.com's nihilism is a spiritual discipline. It's not finding no value, it's removing objective value in order to find objective structure. Value = subjective, structure = objective; we are judged by what we value, and justly so...

DEATH TO THE UNDERMEN
who prefer ulver to burzum

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 17, 2006, 04:22:55 AM
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Sounds like anus.com's brand of nihilism. Where most nihilism is existential, or people worrying about meaning in their own lives, anus.com's nihilism is a spiritual discipline. It's not finding no value, it's removing objective value in order to find objective structure. Value = subjective, structure = objective; we are judged by what we value, and justly so...

DEATH TO THE UNDERMEN
who prefer ulver to burzum



I don't see any real break between these forms of nihilism, as they are elements of the same process rather than opposed functions.  The nihilism of devaluation is a necessary precursor to the nihilism of revaluation.  The broken facade of illusions must be stripped away from the framework of reality before new (old?) values can be worked out to clothe it again.  Even after this is achieved, the nihilism of devaluation still remains useful; as we must constantly test our values against reality or error will seep back in.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 18, 2006, 05:11:54 PM
"...And if you gaze long enough into the abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you."

This serves quite well in terms of describing our most sincere listening sessions with black metal, I believe.

Concerning the description:
"Emotional detachment without apathy."

It is brilliant, in that it structurally (in its simplicity) and literally relates the essence of black metal--like a haiku. ;) How can an art form that, when done correctly, lacks subjectivity convey emotion, unless it existed outside of the Self? Black Metal stands from the outside looking in, if not completely transcendent and all-pervading.

It is a spiritual rite of passage, dissolving the lines between where the Ego ends and the Objective World begins. I don't see any particular emotion attached its best examples (i.e. Gorgoroth as described as "hateful"); the second-rate stuff is belied by its utter humanity. Lyrical content may also lend to this phenomena significantly, although it is common in most genres of metal.

Still, there is something unique about black metal that would be most pleasant if manifest in death metal.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 21, 2006, 07:47:11 PM
for me! it's not an "emotional detachment...",.. because,metal/black metal was neve be  an emotional stuff!!
and it is not a fuckin art!
black metal is d suorce of my life! and that's fuckin all!

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 22, 2006, 04:41:28 AM
Let the crucifixion begin!

Re: What is black metal, as art?
January 28, 2006, 02:33:56 PM
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"Emotional detachment without apathy."

How can an art form that, when done correctly, lacks subjectivity convey emotion, unless it existed outside of the Self? Black Metal stands from the outside looking in, if not completely transcendent and all-pervading.


Very common to transcendent idealist artforms is this tendency to see the whole, instead of the personal. But sheep will always prefer the latter.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
February 16, 2006, 07:35:31 PM
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Methinks you can just close this thread now.  ;)


I think this thread is important in that, if black metal is to have a future, it will be by discovering what values it has to offer (e.g. has in common) instead of what weird or dysfunctional individualistic values can be projected upon it. Black metal is romanticism. It's also anti-individualistic Romanticism; like holistic morality, a view of the world as an organic whole (cosmic idealism, some would say). I hope it keeps developing, because since 1996 or so it has been stagnant, starting with its ideas and then extending to the music. The two are linked and there is no separating them!

Re: What is black metal, as art?
February 19, 2006, 07:08:11 PM
In response to the "anti-satan"  statement about black metal:

The general purpose of mentioning "Satan" in most (good) black metal songs is to use that "entity" as a metaphor for transcendance of Judeo-Christian weakness. "Satan" is very much a symbol of philosophical defiance against the thinking of Christianity, which is focused on a particular order in the world (i.e. idolization of the pitiful and weak). "Satan" is also a metaphor for the trials that test a person's very soul and strengthen the will of the individual so he may attain true transcendance. There is also the implication that "Satan's" trials destroy those that are not truly meant for transcendance, unlike Judeo-Christianity, which claims that simply being born makes you able to attain.

Now, as for the main topic of the thread:

Early black metal seemed to be fixated on the aesthetics of conservation.For example, (Most) Darkthrone albums are intentionally stripped down and bare in their sound. This is a way to keep the energy in the music and not waste it on production or polishing or any of the things that make music blandly agreeable to the masses. This conservation of energy is most readily mirrored in Nature, for which the early black metal bands a great respect. The organisms that survive in nature are the ones that most easily adapt to the available spots of the food chain, or to the flow of energy in the environment. Humans fit best into this perspective when they are  free of frivolous energy-wasting activities like consumer culture, or not engaged in Christian self-loathing.  If we take the idea of conservation to its conclusion, we may discover that it demands humans be reduced to their most optimal qualities and quantities.

In a sense, the "emotional deattachment without apathy" coincides exactly with black metal's regard of Nature. Nature does not hold any sympathy or hate for those it molds. It merely shapes and twists them into the shape most suitable to the environment with the greatest of care. That is why both Nature and (well-executed) black metal are beautiful; they contain only what is necessary and reject what is wasteful.

Re: What is black metal, as art?
February 24, 2006, 06:15:52 PM
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Early black metal seemed to be fixated on the aesthetics of conservation.For example, (Most) Darkthrone albums are intentionally stripped down and bare in their sound. This is a way to keep the energy in the music and not waste it on production or polishing or any of the things that make music blandly agreeable to the masses. This conservation of energy is most readily mirrored in Nature, for which the early black metal bands a great respect. The organisms that survive in nature are the ones that most easily adapt to the available spots of the food chain, or to the flow of energy in the environment.

In a sense, the "emotional deattachment without apathy" coincides exactly with black metal's regard of Nature.


What a wonderful analysis. Completely agreed, here. Black metal is a genre that studies design and rejects/burns aesthetics and its most loathsome branch, individualism. In doing so, it is more affirming of the individual by giving them a realistic position in the cosmic order, instead of a false predominance achieved through solipsistic self-reference...

DEATH TO MODERNITY
DEATH TO MOSES
DEATH TO CHRIST
DEATH TO THE MACHINE
DEATH TO THE MAN




Re: What is black metal, as art?
September 23, 2006, 03:27:41 AM
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"Emotional detachment without apathy."


It's not emotional detachment at all. It's emotional reattachment. The "emotional" stuff we see in this society is basically just fear. It's "emotional" because it's irrational. Black metal is pure emotion. Unlike the rest of society, it has gotten over its fear of dying alone however.

aimanirrajim

Re: What is black metal, as art?
September 23, 2006, 11:57:15 PM
as prozak defines it, "nihilistic idealism" which to me is the only correct definition, period.