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Da Gamez...

Da Gamez...
April 10, 2013, 02:56:58 PM
I imagine most of you play some games on your seriously overpowered computers.
Because, apart from hoarding music, gazing at porn, and hurling abuse at people you will never meet, what else is a computer any good for?
It might be interesting to hear if anyone actually does have any other valid uses :)
But I digress...

It was Guild Wars, for me, before its graphics faded from cutting-edge into antiquated. But I got really tired of hordes of monsters trying to kill me every five paces. And before that, it was aerial combat simulators, because I've always had an inexplicable interest in warbirds.
But now - for now - it is Skyrim.
I just love wandering in the vast reaches of ancient nordic forests and mountains. Cold and snow. Random danger. Beautifully rendered and immersive. Now I do it all on horseback.

Strangely, all my characters are female, along with all the NPCs I've made as followers, and I've often wondered about this. But of course, the answer is obvious, once you see it:
I'd far rather be seeing stunning females on the screen, than brute men :)





Re: Da Gamez...
April 12, 2013, 06:03:35 PM
No way man I like looking at muscular men in skimpy outfits. I don't play any games at this time, but I used to play a lot of FPS's until I finally had to just go outside. That shit gets obsessive.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 12, 2013, 06:24:59 PM
Ha :)
Da Gamez is a winter time pursuit for me. But then, I live in the frozen north.
Come spring, I have more important things to do, like trying to breathe while the pollen drifts like snow.
You're right though: these things can become obsessive.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 03:21:18 AM
I broke my ankle recently I've been spending more time than usual playing video games. Namely, the new Luigi's Mansion. The 'combat' part of the game is satisfying, but very easy and basic. No, the heart of the game lies in the exceedingly clever puzzles. They game lays out a set of essential techniques and rules, and as the game progresses, makes you recombine and apply them in new ways and different contexts. This is the essence of a good game.

Skyrim is a good fun romp, but doesn't require more than 2 watts of brain power, which is perhaps the heart of its appeal. This 4chan post sums it up quite nicely.

As a side note, TROO GAMERZ don't use walkthroughs and guides.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 05:27:35 AM
So, some of you sometimes play videogames.
Here's a question for you:
You build up a character, and sink many hours into doing this.
You tweak the game, and add modifications from all over the place.
How do you feel when all your save-games get lost?
How do you feel when the game itself gets trashed, and you must start all over again?


NHA

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 11:02:54 AM
I like hyper-competitive team based multi-player games. The type where if you make one bad play, you get people flaming you for 30min and telling you to uninstall and go kill yourself.


Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 11:33:41 AM
As far as games go I prefer chess to video games, although its addictive nature and the possibility of continuous play through internet servers can have a serious impact on your capacity to do anything else.  Not so different from video games I guess but chess has more potential for creative input whereas with video games even if you appreciate the artistry that went into creating them you cannot really make any creative contribution to them.  Recently I have also started to become interested in the Chinese board game known as Go, there seems to be an immense beauty in this game although my understanding of it is quite limited.

I think video games would be better if they focused more on being literature by creating atmosphere and telling a good story rather than 'games', since the interactive component of a video game is nearly always fairly superficial.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 05:46:25 PM
The big deficiency of many games is their insistence that killing and destruction is the only reason to play.
Skyrim is set in a beautiful and realistic world, and while there are plenty of foes to deal with, one has a choice whether or not one actively engages them.
Having a fast horse, for example, allows me to gallop in the other direction, and outpace nearly everything.
For me, the environment is everything. Just like in reality.
But I can wander in it when darkness falls in the real world, or the weather is too atrocious to venture outside.


Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 08:30:24 PM
In an ideal world video games should be illegal.

Well, at least commercially sold ones. They are designed to be escapists tools. Like World of Warcraft, where the computergamer enters an imaginary world where he has to do such things as collects eggs and feathers.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 08:56:10 PM
In an ideal world, ANUS would not exist, either :)

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 09:15:26 PM
I wasted a lot of time on rougelike games...

There can't be an ideal world, as existence comes from change, the breath of the universe. Something goes in, and something goes out, so the anus must always exist in the cycle of birth and death.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 09:29:07 PM
I think video games would be better if they focused more on being literature by creating atmosphere and telling a good story rather than 'games', since the interactive component of a video game is nearly always fairly superficial.
Games have made great strides in the aesthetic and narrative department;this is reflected in game reviews, which are sounding more and more like book reports.

I disagree that aesthetic and narrative should be the primary focus of games, though. A game is just that: a game -- the primary objective of a game is not to have an emotional experience, but to win the game, and as such, interactive gameplay is the bread and butter of the experience. Such is the reason why games like Tetris, while lacking any story at all, have proven popular even twenty years after its creation: it possesses gameplay with depth.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 13, 2013, 11:21:47 PM
Dig-Dug, Pacman...
A mindless drive to win the unwinnable.
Compelling for many, nonetheless.

I sometimes play, though, for other reasons than simply winning. If the game is beautiful, I play for the beauty, though often, survival is the only way to play the game.
I've noticed, often, with jarring non-comprehension, that many gamers speak of "beating the game".
Maybe that's exactly what it sounds like: masturbation.

Re: Da Gamez...
April 14, 2013, 01:10:29 AM
No doubt that modern games can have awe-inspiring visuals that one might go so far as to call beautiful. Skyrim certainly does have a way of sucking you in to its landscapes (the music is great, too!). However, you are the first person I have encountered to express interest in a 'game' that consists of nothing but this. If there actually was a video game that was nothing but a nature-walk, I can't say I would play it.

My inner entrepreneur, however, is seeing dollar signs. I can see it now: every retirement home of the future will be equipped with a virtual reality room, capable of whisking its denizens away to fully navigable natural environments where they can pretend they're young again :)



Re: Da Gamez...
April 14, 2013, 03:06:59 AM
I disagree that aesthetic and narrative should be the primary focus of games, though. A game is just that: a game -- the primary objective of a game is not to have an emotional experience, but to win the game, and as such, interactive gameplay is the bread and butter of the experience. Such is the reason why games like Tetris, while lacking any story at all, have proven popular even twenty years after its creation: it possesses gameplay with depth.

I was suggesting that this might be a way for video games to ascend to the level of real art.  Since as far as depth and beauty of actual gameplay is concerned we already have traditional board games that will not be surpassed.  I have played some games, generally much older ones, that have an atmosphere as potent as quality metal, although they lack the sense of direction and purpose that metal has.  Modern games seem to be a step backwards in this development.

One of the biggest problems with video games was suggested by someone on this site (maybe Prozak but I can't remember), this is that they are designed so that the average person can become good at them in a short period of time.