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Philosophy vs. Wisdom.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 26, 2013, 05:33:19 AM
It doesn't just happen, but it will never happen at all until it is begun.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 26, 2013, 08:01:28 AM


What if I put a cheese, you looked at, turned around, and in the meantime I replaced it with a piece of rubber replica, and you looked at it again.

Both observations would say it is the same cheese, but that obviously is wrong. The rubber does not smell or taste like a cheese.

I suppose, that what you mean by "is" withour processing is simply the experience of the visual impression of the yellow square cheeselike object. When you go to smell the object it is a different experience, and again with taste it "is" a new experience.


Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 26, 2013, 01:07:44 PM
Maybe the message can be stated as: Dont see things as a combination of superficialities, see the thing in itself.

crow even the ancient masters did not bring wisdom to the masses, rather those among them who awakened to it would seek them. These are not things you can transmit with words, perhaps you know this better than me. First an awakening must happen. If you look at the neoreactionary space (of which Amerika would probably be a part), you see a lot of people who have awakened to the truth of their world, but many still process it in the same way that they used to when they were still happy liberals. Similar... patterns of behaviour, inability to see the big picture, inability even to acknowledge the existence of a big picture. At the same time, some do change so maybe I am wrong!

But I am sure you could count the number of people who you have awakened to wisdom with words alone on one fist.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 26, 2013, 05:26:57 PM
Absolutely.
I seek nobody's awakening, though, because this can not be.
I do seek to lay down accounts of another consciousness, not to deliver it to anyone, but to inspire/encourage them to discover it for themselves.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 26, 2013, 08:26:26 PM
The metaphysical truths can be explained in an approximate way, but no explanation is the metaphysical truths.

The "masses" are uniform in that they will not listen, as they already have made up their mind or don't care.

Anybody else are worth communicating with.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 26, 2013, 08:29:43 PM
Yes. You have to endure a very large number of boors before a live one shows up.
There's no better way to learn that most important skill of patience.


Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 01:07:18 AM
Absolutely.
I seek nobody's awakening, though, because this can not be.
I do seek to lay down accounts of another consciousness, not to deliver it to anyone, but to inspire/encourage them to discover it for themselves.

Philosophy can be similar, giving you a window into the wise even if the content seems to be too deliberate in its reasoning. Personally, I prefer the aphorism, much more powerful and poetic. Example: Don Colachos Aphorisms

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 01:16:05 AM
Aphorism is my favourite medium. Albeit in the style of Lao Tzu.
However, when enough people get annoyed at me for 'trying to sound wise', or out and out not 'getting it', I find myself experimenting with other, less attractive mediums.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 01:31:04 AM
It is strong medicine, and not always appropriate. It can get annoying.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 04:33:19 AM
I always wondered why some philosophers tend to write so much to say so little? It's  like the more they are trapped in the supperficial world (like the marxist phylosophers) the more they tend to write big, incomprehensible words.
It's a chance that I was rebutted by their writing style, their thoughts never have a chance to have a grasp on me.  :)

I gained more knowledge about life reading  comic books than reading philosophy books.
Is there some philosophy books that is worth reading instead of reading books like the Tao te king or the Upanishads? The only phylosophy book that I have read in its entirely  is ''Thus Spoke Zarathustra'' if that counts or ''Beyond Good and Evil'' a long time ago.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 04:38:33 AM
Try reading Genesis again, but as a comic-book that uses simplistic descriptions for eternal truths.
It's amazing what it actually says, once you dispense with the Christian perspective.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 04:46:33 AM
Thanks for the advice.  I haven't read it in a really long time.

There's some good stuff in the bible if you search enough.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 08:05:22 AM
Or dont dispense with anything and just read it as-is, without expectations. I have always found the Bible to be a profound text. Very un-PC to boot. If all Christians took all of the Bible 100% seriously, Christianity would be reborn in strength.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 05:07:07 PM
Fair enough. I've become somewhat jaded with Christianity and Christians, lately.
There's a definite siege mentality that characterizes many of them, now.
I find Genesis to be magnificent and true, but only when not under the obligation to interpret it through a Christian outlook. In fact, once interpretation is suspended, it reads completely differently, in the same way the verses of tao te ching say something different, each time they are re-read.

In the same vein, how different Christianity would be, if its magnificent old-world churches were a place of mostly silence, without the endless droning of the clergy, to ruin the ambiance.

Re: Philosophy vs. Wisdom.
April 27, 2013, 08:07:42 PM
Christianity cannot be understood throug the bible alone.

I think the bible has some holes. F.e. in WHY one should love ones neighbour, which is f.e. much clearer in Indian litterature.

Modern christianity is insane.

Real christianity must have the Greek-Roman spirit with it, besides of some non biblical wisdom.

My priest great-grandfather was asked by a man what to do : His wife had run off with some boy.

He thus said, you must go and beat that guy up, as the holy matrimony is unbreakable.

He then went and beat that guy and reclaimed his wife. And that was a very christian and moral thing to do.

Of course, no modern unbeliever prist would advise such, but rather advise to turn the other buttcheek.