Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Unintentional metaphors for modernity

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 12, 2013, 02:47:03 PM
Nihilism is a way out of our acquired delusions. It's like a screen allowing garbage filtration or an electronic filter reducing noise. Treasure or gain (value), if any, resulting from the filtration/rejection is a different matter.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 12, 2013, 05:18:48 PM
One big application of this nihilism is the recognition of the ceaseless, inexorable threat of spiritual deformity.  Instead of jerking away from it (like over-correcting a car causing it to flip,) nihilism suppresses desire and allows one to feel dispassionately his submergence in corruption.  Then an effortless, gradual process of healing begins.


Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 12, 2013, 09:29:13 PM
Essentially it's a way of sorting the real from the fake. To ask yourself the question: 'What does it really mean to believe in nothing?' is to initiate a process of cleansing.

I agree with this, and think it's more than cleansing, it's "abandonment."
You are right. But in a certain sense, isn't this abandonment also a return?

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 12:06:24 AM
It is, yes. I have always considered the Nihilism espoused here a process, not a goal. Let go of meaning to discover meaning. You can only filter when you are not immersed, when you have a meta-view.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 12:14:25 PM
That's all very insightful but you are only talking of the practical application of nihilism and using your own definiton of the word.

That's usually not allowed.

A nihilist rejects the concept of intrinsic, inerent, or immanent value.

None of you are really nihilists. You are like the gay Christian; everything in the Bible is brilliant and uplifting except for that part in which God says that it is detestable for men to have sexual relations. So long as you ignore that little detal, your identity is sound. (Yes, I have argued with this person before and had to give up because, like most of you, they were inserting their own sub-definitions in order to fit the concept more squarely onto themselves.)

Perhaps you (some of you) have achieved a state of nihilism at some time or another, but were just unable to or uninterested in maintaining that state, because you are right back to where you started, only with different values in mind.

That's not nihilism. I know it sounds tough and dangerous, but you should choose another word that actually describes what  you do.

(The use of "you" in this case refers to the forum users broadly but if you feel you are an exception, then you probably are.)

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 03:51:34 PM
Stoicism probably applies more to the folk here than "active" Nihilism. I prefer the term stoic for myself if I must choose

Human beings can only control  their actions and their assessments; they cannot directly know abolute truth. The only thing that matters in life is recognising the good and acting in accordance with it. All in all, a radical affirmation of what reality actually is, is the goal. That in and of itself requires all the same work as active Nihilism without the angst ridden connotations
 and denial of objective good.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 06:12:53 PM
See, this guy gets it! Most of the way, at least.

Beware the true functional nihilist. Do not confuse him for a sociopath, because a sociopath is more predictable; their goals are their own. Do not confuse him for an autistic beta male enmired in bitterness and revenge fantasies. The functional nihilist is not crippled by angst or striving for equilibrium; he is truly the purest conduit of chaotic manifestations.

Having read up on ANUSian theory does not make you an expert on nihilism and it especially does not allow you the authority to redefine nihilism as you see fit. Expand upon it all you want but your post-stoicism is a far cry from what was envisioned when the concept of the "over-man" was established. Evil and lawlesness, hatred, insanity, slavery, and absurd cruelty are (an intrinisc) part of the path of nihilism and if you deny any of the uncomfortable parts, you are neither a nihilist nor do you have a solid understanding of what nihilism entails.

Of course, were you all actual nihilists, you would not be so easy to talk to, so I appreciate that.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 06:27:18 PM
I think the overman is misunderstood: it is describing something simple: A man who is a full expression of his values.

Which is the highest state any human could strive for.

Other interpretations are useless to humanity.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 06:56:33 PM
I have to wonder: is a Nihilist something you really want to be?
I mean, it is a label, after all.
Might it not be a better idea to discover exactly what you are, and simply be that, compromising as little as possible, or not at all?

For a long time I thought of myself as a taoist, because that seemed the closest description of what I was.
But I had, at some point, to admit I was really not like anything else, and was, in fact, whatever I was.


Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 06:59:22 PM
That's all very insightful but you are only talking of the practical application of nihilism and using your own definiton of the word.

Not a problem for me at least, I am not a nihilist by any definition, but I cannot speak for others.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 08:29:27 PM
Pure nihilism is more like a singularity (or a *limit*) that can be approached but never reached.

As for why a human would want to become a nihilist: I see no reason for it. To embrace nihilism is to become something other than human. If you like being a human, you can orbit the singularity but you cannot begin to approach it or you will lose what you like.

At once you could become superhuman (in that your capacity for enacting change is increased because you make no distinction between change caused by destruction and changed caused by creation, whereas if you only enact change through creation your capacity is limited) and subhuman (because you would not experience humanity as a company, only as things, utilities, objects).

My main argument is that ANUSian nihilism is like "nihilism lite", or Christianity for homos.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 09:38:59 PM
Quote
Evil and lawlesness, hatred, insanity, slavery, and absurd cruelty are (an intrinisc) part of the path of nihilism and if you deny any of the uncomfortable parts, you are neither a nihilist nor do you have a solid understanding of what nihilism entails.

How does ascribing moralistic judgments to a nihilist's actions make sense?

http://www.anus.com/zine/philosophy/index_society.html

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 11:38:41 PM
Quote
Evil and lawlesness, hatred, insanity, slavery, and absurd cruelty are (an intrinisc) part of the path of nihilism and if you deny any of the uncomfortable parts, you are neither a nihilist nor do you have a solid understanding of what nihilism entails.

How does ascribing moralistic judgments to a nihilist's actions make sense?

http://www.anus.com/zine/philosophy/index_society.html

There are two ways to explain it, and I'll use both.

1. We are speaking of nihilism from an outside perspective, and we make judgments on values and morals. To us, a nihilist will do things that we find morally objectionable, even if they do not comprehend that judgment.

2. Morals do not allow for in-between spaces. Good and evil are binary categories, and just because someone (a nihilist, say) rejects this binary interpretation, he is not absolved from judgment by non-nihilists. We are familiar with heterosexuals and homosexuals, but less familiar is the asexual. We do not categorize them as one or the other because they are not physiologically confined to the hetero/homo binary categories, so we expect that they will not take part in hetero/homo functions. "Dropping out" of the good/evil binary categories does not allow you this freedom; people will still expect you to operate within judgment parameters.

So, we can say that because a nihilist is not good, he must be evil, because as darkness is absence of light, evil is absence of good, and isn't necessarily (or rarely ever, actually) the choice of the individual for the sake of committing evil.

The nihilist won't see it like that, but we can ignore their perceptions for now.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 13, 2013, 11:57:29 PM
I haven't lived in the theoretical continuum for so long, that when I see posts like that, I shake my head and smile.

Re: Unintentional metaphors for modernity
September 14, 2013, 01:13:14 AM
Do you think that nihilism can only be applied theoretically? You have too much experience to think that. What do you mean to tell me then?