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An avian definition of Nihilism.

An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 11, 2013, 10:00:25 PM
From the perspective of a crow, Nihilism is thus:

The realization that just about every viewpoint a human has, about the way things are, is completely arbitrary, and hence suspicious.
Society, and its rules, are arbitrary. They have no basis in reality.
Civilization, itself, is arbitrary. It is a group of people agreeing to behave in certain ways, so that they are all on the same page.
Not much of this social interaction is truth. It is almost all made-up, by crazies who like their own ways of seeing life, as opposed to understanding what life actually is.
Therefore, Nihilism is a good starting point to discover the truth of things, and a baseline from which to sortie outwards in the exploration of - and search for - reality.

On the other hand, Nihilism is not:
Behaving like a devil-worshipping, disgusting, scurrilous cannibal, in order to show others what a brilliant and irreverent rebel one is.

This is not a widely-held, or popular definition of what Nihilism is, but rather what a crow makes of it, from the limited exposure a crow has, to such things.
Do feel free to correct or modify this description, to explain your own ideas on Nihilism.



Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 11, 2013, 10:11:20 PM
Quote
Behaving like a devil-worshipping, disgusting, scurrilous cannibal, in order to show others what a brilliant and irreverent rebel one is.

This is very, very important. I've noticed this popping up in myself from time to time, almost as a default.

I work hard on ridding myself of it completely. It's a general problem of my generation - and it's a very bad habit.

Through this toxic consumer 'culture' of ours, all us young people have pretty much been programmed to act as artificial rebels. It needs to stop. Nihilism should be a means towards this - not an excuse for posturing.

Thanks for the reminder.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 11, 2013, 10:16:20 PM
You and I really must have an in-depth conversation, one day.
I wonder what steroids your soul is on, to result in the results we see.
You are positively rare.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 11, 2013, 10:23:20 PM
Quote
Society, and its rules, are arbitrary. They have no basis in reality.


Current society, perhaps.

Older, organic societies, while still being arbitrary in the sense of being ordered by preference, had a basis in reality in that they formed a hierarchical structure and reverence for the natural.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 11, 2013, 11:43:23 PM
Any society. So far. That is why none last.
As soon as the social displaces the natural, the seeds of demise are sown.
It may take centuries, or it may take years, but the result is always the same.
Losing touch with the business of survival as Number One is the biggest of big mistakes.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 12:20:48 AM
For humans to be fully human they need to achieve what no humans have yet achieved.

‹bermensch ho!

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 12:58:53 AM
Societies, temporary as they may be, are nevertheless significant.

Carl Sagan said that the human mind results from the universe trying to know itself.

Without society, we would not "know" much.

Besides, what objective use are people en masse except for workers to support such intense projects of exploration? Knowing enhances our heirarchy universally. We've barely mapped 10% of our ocean, and we haven't mapped the dark side of our own moon. We don't even know where our moon comes from!

Bash it all you like, but scientific investigation has yielded to us a universe that is more vast than imagination ever showed us. This all thanks to societies, modern and ancient.

Society is not an "unnatural" thing, else it would manifest. Maybe they will always be transient; everything else is anyway. Still we build on the discoveries of past societies, no matter how flawed they were ideologically.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 01:12:47 AM
What would you say if I told you that knowing 'stuff' is as limited as a child's tricycle?
How much 'stuff' do you think you can know?
What if you had access to not just knowing 'stuff', but to Knowing? Everything?

The Garden of Eden. The Tree of Knowledge. That's where it all is. just waiting for you to find a way back in to The Garden.

No society is going to provide you with that information, because no society has it.
If it did, it wouldn't be something so Rube Goldberg jury-rigged as a society.
If society has any real value - and of course, it does - then it is more like a consolation prize.


Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 01:15:52 AM
For humans to be fully human they need to achieve what no humans have yet achieved.


There are a few fully-human humans. They have achieved what the many never will.
Thus Plato's Cave anecdote. They are generally held to be idiots.



Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 03:56:23 AM
As soon as the social displaces the natural, the seeds of demise are sown.

This sounds like nihilism to me.

The social environment takes over; why? I think it's because (a) intelligence is a trap and (b) people feel awkward about inequality when they're forced to interact outside of a strict role relationship.

Roles were originally pretty obvious, based on what one was able to do... and heredity.

Eventually, that got replaced by the concept of meritocracy and "fairness" as a way of making people like you.

Then the  mediocre figure out they can use this to get ahead without actually doing anything. Wham, it's off to the races.

Nihilism is the rejection of anything except logic/reality.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 09:27:46 AM
Carl Sagan said that the human mind results from the universe trying to know itself.

This is probably the most egregious example of his pseudo-religious science flavoured spiritualism-for-adolescent-atheists crap you can find. The universe trying to know itself? What the hell does this deep sounding phrase mean?

Being a science popularizer has elevated his stature (on the internet) to that of a great scientist or thinker when he is neither. Just a better version of Neil Tyson.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 02:14:38 PM
For humans to be fully human they need to achieve what no humans have yet achieved.


There are a few fully-human humans. They have achieved what the many never will.
Thus Plato's Cave anecdote. They are generally held to be idiots.

No society has yet been fully human.

Older ones were more so than current ones, though they still had flaws as you pointed out. Current society is probably as close to being as un-human as possible, perhaps second to the Soviet Union.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 12, 2013, 08:16:02 PM
You and I really must have an in-depth conversation, one day.
I wonder what steroids your soul is on, to result in the results we see.
You are positively rare.

It's a strange and wonderful thing. There's no telling what it is. I have noticed this, though: My breathing has become a slow and steady continuous flow.

I don't now about rare, though. In many ways, I'm still just an ordinary guy. You're the one who have done wonders for these boards.

I have a feeling that we'll soon have something to talk in-depht about. Don't know what. Just a hunch.

And to adress the topic -

We will have a truly human society only when we have humane humans, knowing what a human is, what it can be and do - and just as important, what it can not and never do or be.

Modern society is based around the assumption that humans are precisely that, which truly humane humans can never ever be: Equal.

The so-called humanism of today is nothing but an excuse for inhumanity.

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 13, 2013, 03:48:29 AM
This breathing: do you simply feel as if you are breathing, or rather that you are being breathed?

Re: An avian definition of Nihilism.
September 13, 2013, 12:00:40 PM
To be perfectly honest, I havenÝt really thought about what it feels like, as much as I have been enjoying the sensation.

I don't now about 'being breathed' - but in a way, I guess you could call it that.

I'll try to describe it: It feels like a slow vibration within me. The vibration doesn't feel like me - but it doesn't feel like it's not me either - if that makes any sense?

My awarness can float freely around this vibration - and even 'see' it, or feel it in the world, in the swaying of trees, or the pulsing of traffic, or in the rythm of the way people walk. Also in the connection between the words and small movements of facial-muscles when people talk.

Words don't really do it justice - but it's real cool :)