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Asian 'pentatonic' scale?

Asian 'pentatonic' scale?
November 08, 2008, 12:09:40 AM
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=w5rs7pfZuPs

I found this video on a blog posting, and the music they are playing, at times, sounds like it fits the intervals in the blues/pentatonic scale.

Are there any other observations that the more musically-inclined here can lend?

Re: Asian 'pentatonic' scale?
November 08, 2008, 12:22:53 AM
it is pentatonic. it's a very common scale. there's a reason why weev posted the dueling banjo video beneath it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyKvD-4IxOY

Re: Asian 'pentatonic' scale?
November 08, 2008, 12:37:13 AM
it is pentatonic. it's a very common scale. there's a reason why weev posted the dueling banjo video beneath it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyKvD-4IxOY

Aha, it's a small internet world!

I get it now, thanks.


Re: Asian 'pentatonic' scale?
September 27, 2013, 02:04:57 PM
Quote
“When Rob left we had a new younger singer and it was the way metal was moving anyway hence Jugulator and Demolition; it just gave us licence to do something different from what we had done before. Through the mid to latter part of the 80’s you can get kind of stuck in a rut in musical terms if you are going to rely on the pentatonic scales, blues scales and natural minor scales…so you have to move things on a bit. I began to look at incorporating other scales that in all fairness other people had started to do, half tone, diminished and harmonic minor and started to use those in solos. And then started to construct songs around those scales which was fairly prevalent in Jugulator onwards and you have a realisation that those scales have been used for centuries in classical music and then the next step was stepping out for me. I know that other guitar players have been through the same thing as me and ended up looking at jazz even if they only play it in their studio or bedroom. If you have been a musician long enough then you inevitably become a jazz musician – I think that’s the case and most musicians will go through blues, folk or whatever it is that you do and end up looking to classical and eventually jazz and becoming a free form artist."

http://www.themidlandsrocks.com/defender-of-the-faith-k-k-downing-talks-exclusively-to-the-midlands-rocks/#.UkWBgVO0BAi

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Re: Asian 'pentatonic' scale?
September 28, 2013, 02:55:58 AM
The easiest way to learn the pentatonic scale is to play only the black keys on a piano. It has a sound that's easy to identify, as you really only have to hear it a few times to learn to recognize it.

Debussy uses it frequently in his piano pieces.

Kirk Hammett also uses it a ton on Kill 'em All.