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Later Graveland

Later Graveland
October 16, 2007, 08:04:26 PM
It's too bad these works don't get the credit Summoning gets around here, or almost anything else gets elsewhere. They're excellent, but in the same understated way that early Enslaved was, in that they're almost entirely ambient pieces. Do not expect dynamic change. Expect melodies to change like waves at a forgotten beach.

Dawn of Iron Blades, Memory and Destiny and Will Stronger Than Death impress me more than Fire Chariot of Destruction, but that's not for any measured reason so far. There's a huge Bathory Hammerheart influence, plus the obvious desire to be a soundtrack, and what might be called a lot of latent Emperorisms in how they're "orchestrated" (68 virtual MIDI warriors). I can hear some of what might be Burzum or Gorgoroth, but those are too jagged for what's here, which is the epic style of later Bathory with some soundtrack mixed in.

But it's quite good. You need to be sitting still to appreciate it, and just listening, so you can absorb more than inject your own ego narrative into it. Think of these albums as one big song, and more like Lord Wind with guitars than the bouncing black metal most people try to make. Death to bombast, long live subtlety!

Re: Later Graveland
October 17, 2007, 12:12:20 AM
What do you think of The Fire of Awakening? I never hear anyone talking about this one, though it is probably my favourite Graveland release (second to The Celtic Winter though I guess). The opening track particularly, 'We Shall Prevail', is truly epic with a warlike spirit; to me it sums up Graveland. Then again I haven't actually heard these later releases, only the earlier ones (and Lord Wind). I'll endeavor to get a hold of the ones you mentioned.  :)

chb

Re: Later Graveland
October 17, 2007, 09:45:15 AM
I have heard the two latest ones. They are powerful and direct yet subtle at the same time, just the way good metal should be. Like b4b said, they work best when you try to forget about yourself and concentrate just on the music. Definitely have to cheack out the other ones mentioned here

Re: Later Graveland
October 17, 2007, 01:29:44 PM
His last few releases seem to have a new approach to writing (I am referring to The Fire of Awakening, Dawn of Iron Blade and Fire Chariot of Destruction, haven't heard Will.. yet). The structure of the songs seems less focussed on individual melodies, or even harmonic patterns but more on subtle shifts in texture. The effect on me is quite different to most albums I hear, I don't go away remember any specific point or points of the album being captivating, but just remember the whole album being captivating.


Re: Later Graveland
October 17, 2007, 02:55:50 PM
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You need to be sitting still to appreciate it, and just listening, so you can absorb more than inject your own ego narrative into it.


Perhaps this is what marred my appreciation of it! I was traveling while listening to it. The comparison to early Enslaved sounds quite right.

I still feel Silenius and Protector, along with Averse Sefira, are the last word in modern Black Metal. I have faith in Varg as well.

Re: Later Graveland
October 18, 2007, 03:11:03 PM
In all honesty, I like the newer Graveland better than the older Graveland.  I just never saw what was so special about the older albums, but I can definitely see what is special about the newer albums.

Re: Later Graveland
October 18, 2007, 03:11:37 PM
I'll add that I am glad to see this become a topic and I'll add something more lengthy later.

Re: Later Graveland
October 19, 2007, 08:52:10 AM
My favourites are Thousand Swords, Following the Voice of blood and Impalers wolves, but I think releases like Immortal Pride and Creed of Iron are pretty underrated (at least on anus) I think they are both very good (maybe not on level of Thousand swords but at least for me better than more recent ones)

Re: Later Graveland
October 19, 2007, 06:34:58 PM
It's good stuff, but I wouldn't be listing 'subtlety' as Graveland's defining quality.

Re: Later Graveland
October 22, 2007, 02:22:02 AM
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It's good stuff, but I wouldn't be listing 'subtlety' as Graveland's defining quality.


Other than the interviews, I would list it as one of their defining qualities. The interaction of patterns on the newer material is often so subtle it is missed.

Re: Later Graveland
October 25, 2007, 12:15:36 AM
way too  many albums, Darken needs to learn how to edit.  he's the Mortiis of metal. any spark in the music is lost in a sea of mediocrity.

Re: Later Graveland
October 25, 2007, 02:27:16 AM
part of the problem with later day black metal is the subtlety..it's still good music, but not have the true quality of majesty and hateful expression of the old bands.

on the other hand, bands which act agressive and thrash it out trying to re-live the old style are even more shit.

Re: Later Graveland
October 25, 2007, 06:19:30 AM
Quote
way too  many albums, Darken needs to learn how to edit.  he's the Mortiis of metal. any spark in the music is lost in a sea of mediocrity.


I always thought that Darken's goal was to make music for people who share his beliefs and that he is trying to make a large amount of it very quickly.  

But that's just one thought.  I listen to it all and it's all of good quality if you have an attention span.  If you listen to classical music you'll find that sometimes the same form gets used for perhaps 50 to 100 years at a time and the further you go back the larger the gaps in musical change are.  If one was to claim to make pagen music, then they would have to make a lot of it and it'd have to actually go out of it's way not to evolve.  

It's hard knowing when to draw the line between continuing into a direction you have entered and then knowing when to move on.  Darken ignores the line and finds peace where he is.

Re: Later Graveland
October 27, 2007, 08:25:25 AM
Quote
part of the problem with later day black metal is the subtlety..it's still good music, but not have the true quality of majesty and hateful expression of the old bands.


The thought process behind the genre has evolved. These musicians have aged, and seen things get worse, and have broadened their scope. More to say means more subtlety.