Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Who/What is God?

Re: Who/What is God?
November 28, 2013, 07:15:22 PM
Aha. Wisdom. Always nice to see a bit of that.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 28, 2013, 07:29:15 PM
Laws explain how reality operates, not the reverse.

Scientists seem to get confused over that.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 28, 2013, 07:34:59 PM
Science could be accurately described as an ability to see life through a soda-straw.
Tunnel-vision on steroids.
Too bad: it could be such a useful thing.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 28, 2013, 07:37:57 PM
Law is a not a fluid enough construct to be an accurate description.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 12:48:17 AM
God is the underlying motivic force (cause) behind reality; this includes both physical reality, which we experience through idealization, and the notion of God himself.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 03:21:28 AM
God is the underlying motivic force (cause) behind reality; this includes both physical reality, which we experience through idealization, and the notion of God himself.

Poor description. God causes the notion of God? I think not. Infinite regression.

God is a result of the ego attempting to encapsulate and anthropomorphize the universe.

God is failure.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 04:21:43 AM
Humans have to call it something.
They call it God.
Then, in the way of humans, try to convince themselves that they understand it.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 04:33:58 AM
No Gods. Only reality, and the universe.

But that doesn't mean Thor kicks any less ass.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 04:37:26 AM
As a nihilist, I negate both materialism and dualism.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 04:49:40 AM
God used to mean reality. But reality was there before God, wasn't it? Perhaps there are beings in this universe who have also come to a similar concept as humans did with God. Still, they are creating an idea out of what they observe in reality.

Without reality, God would not exist. Not just in human terms.





This is a really interesting discussion BTW.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 12:37:06 PM
God used to mean reality. But reality was there before God, wasn't it?

Linguistic fallacy. If a thing exists before its name, it's still the same thing. Much as a chair doesn't care whether you call it a chair or not, God doesn't care if you call him God.

Without reality, God would not exist. Not just in human terms.

That's the point. God is within reality. Reality and God play by the same rules. There may be additional dimensions, afterlives, alternate realities, occult dimensions, etc. but they are not dualistic, e.g. of an entirely different logical rule-set than reality itself.

Quote
At the core of the Perennial Philosophy we find four fundamental doctrines.

First: the phenomenal world of matter and of individualized consciousness–the world of things and animals and men and even gods–is the manifestation of a Divine Ground within which all partial realities have their being, and apart from which they would be non-existent.

Second: human beings are capable not merely of knowing about the Divine Ground by inference; they can also realize its existence by a direct intuition, superior to discursive reasoning. This immediate knowledge unites the knower with that which is known.

Third: man possesses a double nature, a phenomenal ego and an eternal Self, which is the inner man, the spirit, the spark of divinity within the soul. It is possible for a man, if he so desires, to identify himself with the spirit and therefore with the Divine Ground, which is of the same or like nature with the spirit.

Fourth: man’s life on earth has only one end and purpose: to identify himself with his eternal Self and so to come to unitive knowledge of the Divine Ground. - A Huxley, "The Perennial Philosophy," introduction to Bhagavad-Gita trans. Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood

Note: you will find similar concepts in Blake, Swedenborg and Eckhart.

Quote
G: First we shall try to understand what is meant by Advaita. How have you understood it?

D: I have heard it explained thus: dvi means two, dvita means the state of being two, that is two-ness. Dvaitam is the same as dvita. Advaita is therefore that thing in which there is no two-ness or duality.

G: Quite so. What do you call that some thing in which there is two-ness?


D: It is brAhman.

G: Perfectly right. And by brAhman you mean that basic principle of reality where from the universe derives its existence, whereon it rests --  and wherein it disappears?

D: Yes.

G: Let us ignore the word brAhman and its full significance for a moment. You give the name of Advaita to the principle which is responsible for the creation, maintenance and dissolution of the universe?

D: Quite so. - "Significance of the name Advaita," from Dialogues with The Guru by Sri Sri Chandrasekara Bharati Swaminah.

Since I've accidentally slid us into texts here, more information can be found:


An elaboration on why this differs from internet-popular definitions of traditionalism.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 03:35:12 PM
Quote
Third: man possesses a double nature, a phenomenal ego and an eternal Self, which is the inner man, the spirit, the spark of divinity within the soul. It is possible for a man, if he so desires, to identify himself with the spirit and therefore with the Divine Ground, which is of the same or like nature with the spirit.

This looks like dualism.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 03:59:15 PM
God used to mean reality. But reality was there before God, wasn't it?

Linguistic fallacy. If a thing exists before its name, it's still the same thing. Much as a chair doesn't care whether you call it a chair or not, God doesn't care if you call him God.

But did it exist before? (I don't even know if one can answer this question)

Supposition: If reality encompasses all that is, ever was, and ever will be, then God exists regardless of our knowledge of God. But, can humans even know this? Seems like something that won't ever provide hard proof, and therefore is relegated to belief.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 29, 2013, 10:16:36 PM
If reality encompasses all that is, ever was, and ever will be, then God exists regardless of our knowledge of God.

Exactly!

But, can humans even know this? Seems like something that won't ever provide hard proof, and therefore is relegated to belief.

Trying to prove that which is not materially, linearly observable, like a patterning or God himself, is impossible. It must be inferred.

It seems to me religion is growing up. Christianity was fixed by Europeans to make it more like their own faiths, and is probably 99% Greco-Roman-Franco-Pagan, but it's simplified to make it exoteric (as Evola points out).

Thus we're heading toward a new faith, which is a lot like the old Hindu and pre-Greek faiths, but perhaps more Europeanized.

Re: Who/What is God?
November 30, 2013, 03:11:34 AM
One thing is for sure:
It is absolutely not possible to have an intellectual discussion about the nature of God.
Intellect could be said to be the polar opposite of whatever God is, or is about.
Intellect, or any abstraction of mind, is to God what the ox-cart is to the starship.