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Breaking on through

Breaking on through
January 03, 2014, 12:52:02 PM
How hard is it to really make the changes that need to be made in order for you to achieve what you know you should (and would rather) be doing but aren't? The you that regretfully never eventuated. How much more pressure needs to build inside your pressure-cooker before you cut loose and maim some poor boss?

Re: Breaking on through
January 03, 2014, 03:19:09 PM
Every barrier is psychological, and those are the hardest ones to break down. There aren't many people anymore who can take the pressure of their peers and culture in stride. So, for the average person (and especially for the above-average person), walls are built up in the psyche that disconnect them from their potential. They stop listening to themselves, and start listening more to the television, and so they never realize anything they could accomplish. If they can even accomplish anything at all.

Strangely enough, the easiest way to break psychological barriers is to break physical ones. Start training for a 5k or lifting more weight than you ever have before. If you're the kind of person that could set goals for yourself in the first place, you're the kind of person that can achieve them. And then you'll find it's harder to be lazy like you were before. And soon you'll find out that it's not that hard to talk to that girl who lives in the apartment across the hall, or tell your boss to suck a dick, or to leave your current life behind and start in a new place, maybe far away from where you are now.

It sounds simple enough, but people tend to make it harder than it is. Self-helpers and new age morons spend a lot of time and money reading and writing books about this, and then continue to sit on the couch when they're finished, thinking that the "positive energy" they give off will bring them everything they want. The few who carry out their plans don't have time for that.

Or, alternatively, you could let the pressure build and then go jihad and kill lots of people. That's becoming a little cliché, though.

Re: Breaking on through
January 03, 2014, 03:52:06 PM
Every barrier is psychological, and those are the hardest ones to break down. There aren't many people anymore who can take the pressure of their peers and culture in stride. So, for the average person (and especially for the above-average person), walls are built up in the psyche that disconnect them from their potential. They stop listening to themselves, and start listening more to the television, and so they never realize anything they could accomplish. If they can even accomplish anything at all.

Strangely enough, the easiest way to break psychological barriers is to break physical ones. Start training for a 5k or lifting more weight than you ever have before. If you're the kind of person that could set goals for yourself in the first place, you're the kind of person that can achieve them. And then you'll find it's harder to be lazy like you were before. And soon you'll find out that it's not that hard to talk to that girl who lives in the apartment across the hall, or tell your boss to suck a dick, or to leave your current life behind and start in a new place, maybe far away from where you are now.

It sounds simple enough, but people tend to make it harder than it is. Self-helpers and new age morons spend a lot of time and money reading and writing books about this, and then continue to sit on the couch when they're finished, thinking that the "positive energy" they give off will bring them everything they want. The few who carry out their plans don't have time for that.

Or, alternatively, you could let the pressure build and then go jihad and kill lots of people. That's becoming a little cliché, though.

I suspect it comes back to (simpler still, in no order):

- self-knowledge, honesty
- environment, personal history
- the nature of goals

Different people will have different goals for different reasons. I've met a few people who would come across in writing as highly "accomplished", undoubtedly hard-working folks. The genuinely insightful, communicative, and the well-balanced ones among them (i.e., not harmfully neurotic, pathologically dishonest, whatever) are - in my experience - in the minority, if not the exception to the rule.

Re: Breaking on through
January 04, 2014, 07:15:08 PM
Quote
I suspect it comes back to (simpler still, in no order):

- self-knowledge, honesty
- environment, personal history
- the nature of goals

Different people will have different goals for different reasons. I've met a few people who would come across in writing as highly "accomplished", undoubtedly hard-working folks. The genuinely insightful, communicative, and the well-balanced ones among them (i.e., not harmfully neurotic, pathologically dishonest, whatever) are - in my experience - in the minority, if not the exception to the rule.

That order is actually pretty spot on. It definitely starts with honesty. If you aren't honest with yourself about your failures and your strengths and weaknesses, then you can never get anywhere trying to "know yourself". After that, environmental and personal factors can be examined and manipulated to serve a better purpose. From there, you can make goals that are fitting to you and your personality.

People who are successful, but mentally and emotionally unbalanced, probably never were honest with themselves, and so took the wrong path for them.

Re: Breaking on through
January 04, 2014, 07:59:04 PM
How hard is it to really make the changes that need to be made in order for you to achieve what you know you should (and would rather) be doing but aren't? The you that regretfully never eventuated. How much more pressure needs to build inside your pressure-cooker before you cut loose and maim some poor boss?


It's actually the easiest thing you'll ever do, which, paradoxically, makes it the hardest, too.
Hardest, because being so easy, you'll probably never bother doing it.

Get yourself down to - say - San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico, and camp out on the beach, or the golf course.
Eat breakfast at Rosa's Cantina, and eat nothing else, all day. Meditate in the desert the rest of the time, and face the fact you're a lying egomaniac. Study the mountain, which is called Tetakawi. Do it until you become the mountain...

Then, after a month, return to DM and tell us all about it.
Easy, see?
Good luck.

Re: Breaking on through
January 05, 2014, 01:37:33 AM
I wouldn't mind a change of scene though I don’t think I could handle living in the desert. I've actually already moved around enough to feel as though I have no real roots in any particular place, so if anything I’m bound to this situation by connections and responsibility to other people (as well as animals we look after).

The real problem is just the straight up mental headfuck of having to deal with modern day over-socialized city people. Comparatively speaking I am probably better off than most in terms of healthy lifestyle and way of seeing the world (i.e. less dependent, less ego-driven, pleasant, courteous), but on the flip side this forces a degree of isolation from the direction that the rest of society seems to have taken (isolation in itself isn't healthy).

Generally I think most personal goals can be achieved by working slowly and steadily over a period of time, other times I get really tired and annoyed that nothing is happening and invariable get back to thinking in more drastic measures. Try something new, do it until I lose the motivation again. On and on in a continual cycle.

Re: Breaking on through
January 05, 2014, 01:54:31 AM
I was being perhaps a bit flippant.
I am luckier than almost everybody in having a truly loving, enlightened wife. That is uber-important to one's own ability to survive in the face of modern madness. We play life off of each other.

The biggest trick, though, to surviving among the lost, is to realize they don't even see you as a human. Far less as anything with a personality or with sensibilities. All they see is themselves, surrounded by loathsome obstacles.
If you remember this, sensitive soul that you are, you will not be hurt, outraged, or demoralized by their dawn-of-the-dead behaviour. It's not about you.

In fact, while we are on the subject: that is really all anybody really needs to know about life:
Q: What is life?
A: IT AIN'T YOU!

Re: Breaking on through
January 05, 2014, 04:59:35 AM
I am luckier than almost everybody in having a truly loving, enlightened wife. That is uber-important to one's own ability to survive in the face of modern madness. We play life off of each other.

The biggest trick, though, to surviving among the lost, is to realize they don't even see you as a human. Far less as anything with a personality or with sensibilities. All they see is themselves, surrounded by loathsome obstacles.
If you remember this, sensitive soul that you are, you will not be hurt, outraged, or demoralized by their dawn-of-the-dead behaviour. It's not about you.

I suspect the benefit of a mate's support is immeasurable.

That said crow, there do seem to be people of worth out there/here. Maybe I'm too young, or already damned and swallowed up by that maw of corruption, if such a thing is possible.

Re: Breaking on through
January 05, 2014, 05:32:37 AM
I am sure you are right, and certainly hope you are.
It is the percentage of the viable to the sheer weight of the expired, that I refer to.
Then again, I have not lived in every place, everywhere, and so the percentages I have experienced may not be indicative of all.
Where I currently live, however, there is a very high percentage of incredibly PC, left-wing zealots.
This probably makes me prone to see demons everywhere.
I'd like nothing more than to realize I was/am wrong.