Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Tolkien

Tolkien
January 04, 2014, 07:46:15 AM
So, it's JRR Tolkien's birthday today!

Care to name a few Death and Black Metal bands' songs which deal with topics from Tolkien's world?

There are also bands who took their name from his creations but I am more interested in the first.

Re: Tolkien
January 04, 2014, 11:47:33 PM
Summoning, blah blah blah... I can't stand Summoning.

Led Zep has some Tolkien inspired songs (Battle of Evermore), and Blind Guardian wrote a lot about Middle Earth generally, but that's all I can come up with off the top of my head. Which is weird when you think about it. The rest of the references I know of are band names.

At any rate, hail Tolkien. Truly a Master of His Art.

Re: Tolkien
January 05, 2014, 04:05:46 PM
Maybe it's because the original tone of his stories is not one of bleak darkness but one of hope in the face of great oppression.  At least in LOTR. 

But I can really see Death Metal writing about some of the stories in The Silmarillion.  With the right twist and emphasis on the 'heavy'(to quote the term used by the 'staff' of this website) aspects of it.

Re: Tolkien
January 06, 2014, 11:27:48 AM
the mighty german band MORGOTH.

Re: Tolkien
January 08, 2014, 12:28:33 AM
Graveland's "White Hand's Power" is about Saruman going to war. 

Fenriz's Isengard side project's first recordings are mostly about Middle-Earth.

Re: Tolkien
January 08, 2014, 12:52:58 AM
I actually first read The Lord of the Rings around the same time that I discovered Burzum. It was a magical time to say the least. Unfortunately I still haven't got around to reading The Silmarillion.

Re: Tolkien
January 08, 2014, 06:13:36 PM
I feel like everything that is inspired by Tolkien is strictly about the fantasy and not what he communicated through it and totally misses the point. SK you get all these superficialities repeated without the underlying purpose that gives them any significance. whatever. I'm about as sick of orcs and elves as I am with zombies, nuclear holocausts and vampires since people seem wholly unable to draw deeper significance out of these creations.

/bitteroldfuck

Re: Tolkien
January 09, 2014, 04:49:55 AM
^ I hear this.

I remember when I finally got around to reading Dracula. After all the anime, video games, movies, comics, and other assorted shit, I figured I was in for something underwhelming. I was wrong. There are themes and atmosphere in that book that run so much deeper than the idea of a guy who is dead but not really and he drinks blood. That is what most people get out of it, though.

Unfortunately, that seems to be the case for the LOTR series as well. People focus on the fantasy aspect, because the fantasy is attractive. They are missing out on the fact the fantasy is a veneer, and the underlying movement in the story could be set in any period, fictional or otherwise, and still be just as significant.

That is what I'm hearing, right?

Re: Tolkien
January 09, 2014, 03:34:20 PM
You've got it. LOTR is set in the context of modern Western civilization in decline. The sad thing is, if people pick up anything "deeper" it's a misinterpreted shire being some hippy village, you know, that old thing.

Re: Tolkien
January 09, 2014, 11:21:22 PM
Burzum!

Even the last Burzum record is named after a poem that Frodo recites at the end of the LOTR. The irony of course is the fact that Tolkien himself recognized, and stated in his letters, that LOTR was a deeply Catholic work, which makes sense given the fact that Tolkien himself was deeply Catholic.

Hail Tolkien and Burzum!
"  Jesus Christ Submitted To The Roman Emperor At His Birth And At His Death: Jesus Christ Never Submitted to Man-Made Modern Democracy! "

Re: Tolkien
January 10, 2014, 12:52:52 AM
I must say I never got stuck on the political or religious overtones in the book, nor was it purely a make-believe fantasy world. It's just a deeply immersive and stimulating story (perhaps more like an ancient saga or fable) that parallels aspects of our own world as perceived through various filters. It is so easy to get pulled into and become so happily lost in that world.

Re: Tolkien
January 10, 2014, 03:33:57 AM
I must say I never got stuck on the political or religious overtones in the book, nor was it purely a make-believe fantasy world. It's just a deeply immersive and stimulating story (perhaps more like an ancient saga or fable) that parallels aspects of our own world as perceived through various filters. It is so easy to get pulled into and become so happily lost in that world.

It is.

However I can't help thinking it is a somewhat blatant celebration of conservative, English old liberal values in the face of a rising industrial totalitarianism from the east!

Take the Hobbits. Only they can save the world from the hammer of oppression, for unlike dwarves and men they do not seek power, instead they grow vegetables, carry bourgeois values, and live a quiet life drinking tea and having village fates.

The answer to totalitarianism lies in apolitical, non adventurous little folk, and not in overt heroism and statesmanship (men), war craft and iron (dwarves), or overt mysticism (elves).

Re: Tolkien
January 10, 2014, 04:28:20 AM
ALL HAIL THE LITTLE FOLK 666
TAH EERF

Re: Tolkien
January 11, 2014, 01:08:26 AM
I see how the story of LOTR (I'm so glad to finally engage in a discussion about this on a metal forum!) can look like a celebration or affirmation of the resilience of the proles. But, let me suggest a different possibility.

The story is told (primarily) from Frodo's perspective because Tolkien was aware that his readers would find his background and disposition more identifiable than that of, say, Legolas or Boromir. The Men, Elves and Dwarves are heroic and daring, the way readers want to be but know they aren't. Readers can put themselves in perspective with the mighty heroes, and appreciate them more, because they have a narrative account (Frodo's) similar to their own from which to view the heroes and their deeds.

There is the fact that *only* Frodo had the fortitude to carry the Ring to the end, but not especially because of his own strength. It was more due to his lack of ambition to rule and control. This is illustrated early in the book where Frodo meets Tom Bombadil, who is powerful beyond Frodo's understanding, but is harmless (even helpful) to he and Sam. I think that expresses how Frodo (and Hobbits in general, maybe) are more willing to be servants to the percieved natural order of things, but only so far as nothing/no one is violating that percieved order. If/when that happens, the Hobbits are driven to acting heroically.

Re: Tolkien
January 11, 2014, 03:35:52 AM
'Prole' is I think the wrong word. Hobbits the are not the proletarians of middle earth. Maybe the dwarves are. The hobbits embody too many bourgeoisie values: (small) landowners, self-employed, protestant work ethic, albeit with a veneer of childish innocense.

So the celebration of the hobbits does not represent a celebration of proles, but of English middle class values. Old liberal values.