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The Professionals

The Professionals
January 07, 2014, 02:09:35 AM
The Matthewson brothers represent a new breed of musicians. The era where a band could subsist on a haze of inspiration, perspiration, and intoxication, leaving all business matters to their manager ended the day the first mp3 file made its way across a copper cable. Record labels can no longer afford to subsidize new artists for a few years while they develop musically and grow their audience. Artists now have to do that on their own. Technology enables artists to create and disseminate music relatively cheaply, but they need business acumen to be able to sell their music, grow their audience, and devise a living on their own. And with less money going around, a manager is just too expensive.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ruthblatt/2013/09/30/rockin-is-my-business-part-1-why-musicians-need-a-business-education/

Re: The Professionals
January 07, 2014, 04:17:59 AM
E never listened to Ken Mode. Reading this article makes me sure that I never need to.

As us ex-hardcore kids use to say, "punx before profits".

Re: The Professionals
January 07, 2014, 02:38:23 PM
I'm sure it's retarded. If I wanted something to succeed with the herd, I'd design it to be simplistic, catchy and vapid.

The real reason for this situation is that there's a glut of music. Bands are competing on bulk, not content.

Re: The Professionals
January 08, 2014, 12:36:30 AM
I'm sure it's retarded. If I wanted something to succeed with the herd, I'd design it to be simplistic, catchy and vapid.

The real reason for this situation is that there's a glut of music. Bands are competing on bulk, not content.

I would also question whether labels are actually going to promote quality if they could even see it for what it is,  let alone the fans which are largely spoon-fed by the labels.

Re: The Professionals
January 08, 2014, 05:04:58 AM
Music sharing was the reason given for the record companies collaborating to crack down on the practice. Sharing may have been a coincidental excuse all along with little impact and not the real cause. Maybe profits were sliding because of all the excess product which the market may have needed to drop in price in order to absorb.

Those ten dollar CDs needed to go down to seven or five but the industry isn't adaptable to that type of volatility. They could keep them at ten or go up to fifteen or twenty if the music itself was more worthwhile and the signing process much more exclusive.

Sure indie development would continue but it would fill up with the excess but people could finally, reliably go to the established part of the industry for the best. Instead what they've done to us customers for a couple of decades is unload excess inventory of dubious worth which has simply created the need for alternatives like music sharing where the customer doesn't get burned.