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Cheap Shit.

Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 06:52:32 PM
What does the title say to you? Have you run into Cheap Shit? How much of it have you run into? Is there anything left that isn't Cheap Shit?

I am old enough to remember the relationship between things you'd buy and what you'd reasonably be able to expect those things to do. The price of things reflected their capability. And capability was something you were buying when you parted with the price.

Things are not remotely like that any more.

Some time ago, I realized products were coming to be almost nothing to do with what they were advertised as being able to do, and almost entirely about persuading you to part with your money. That any business was not about what it could do for you, but instead, had become purely about fleecing you.  Even medical care had somehow turned into raping your finances, while quietly dispensing with 'care'.

I have a little gas-powered generator that advertises itself as being able to deliver 950 watts. After having it fail to live up to expectations for the nine millionth time, I undertook to measure its actual output. My ability to measure such things is a bit limited, but even so, I estimate that it can provide a peak output of somewhere around 700 watts momentarily, before dropping off to a mean output of around 400 watts.
My regular battery chargers advertise an output of 6 amps, but seem to actually deliver only 4.
There are so many examples of this principle that it boggles the mind.
And things that might once have been expected to last for decades now routinely last six months, if they even work at all, once you get through the armor-plated packaging.

The idea seems to be that in order to get consumers to buy a product, it must look appealing, cost almost nothing, and include a free giveaway that has no use whatsoever. Interestingly, what looks good to most consumers almost always looks absolutely revolting to me. I don't really want a toaster that looks like a half-melted satellite that rings, dings and buzzes every few seconds, and displays an LED readout about nothing. But other options are few.

One reason I keep hanging onto, and maintaining, my rusting 1992 Nissan Pathfinder, is that it works. I swear the thing could crawl up my wall and over my roof, if I wanted it to. It's never run into anything that could stop it. Only the decaying frame seems able to permanently stop it, which really saddens me. Because a new Pathfinder is about the ugliest thing I've ever seen, and I'd rather ride around in a wheelchair than drive one of those.

I have lots of battery-operated drills and screwdrivers that have either melted, or their batteries have completely died, refusing to accept any kind of charge. Saws that don't saw. Snow tires that do nothing. A Volvo that has a rough time even rolling downhill.

Etc.

One thing I have learned from all of this, is that cheap doesn't cut it. Neither does expensive. Neither does constant replacement. In fact nothing cuts it, any more. Except, perhaps, what our forebears knew, back in the stone age:
Stone Age Shit Rocks!
If you can't do a job with your own body, mind, and a stone axe, that job probably isn't worth doing!


Re: Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 07:44:51 PM
I didn't realize there were such problems with Canadian health care. Americans were told they need to adopt a more socialized health care model like the magnificent Canadian and European kinds.

But, affordability, the primary issue, was in reality a distant second to quality of the service upon purchase. The quality problem with contemporary medical practice isn't one of competence or lacking technology but of administrative focus.

It's somewhat similar to the problems with the information technology industry. Human resources people have no understanding whatsoever about the profession for which they select candidates so mismatching skill sets with positions takes place.

I get the impression with medicine that many among the administrative authority are not medical doctors but salespeople. So the focus of medical practice across the industry ends up not health care but the excessive sale of products and services that are unnecessary yet profitable.

What we have in common is the endless and unnecessary bureaucratization of everything. The more departments unrelated to the profession in question that are added, the less a given profession is able to deliver.

It is somewhat similar as well with manufacture. Marketing, large quantities and repeat sales feature more prominently than quality of goods in question. The wrong shitheads are calling all the shots just so that the professionals can focus on their professions instead of the management of the profession.

That all in turn suggests a failure of scalability. Perhaps we just can't have one tradesperson or physician attend to several hundred clients each without entropy creeping in regardless of how many bureaucrats and databases are added to manage the inevitible chaos.

Re: Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 07:55:51 PM
It's what happen when people don't work in symbiosis but throught predation. It's all about how one can get more by losing the less possible.

Re: Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 08:19:22 PM
Once you accustom people to Cheap Shit, the glory is that they'll by and large never be able to take advantage of what products that aren't Cheap Shit offer.

Re: Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 08:24:55 PM
Scourge: I recently had a truly surreal experience in hospital, while full of morphine, close to death, and in indescribable pain...

A 'nurse', covered in tattoos, piercings, and openly kissing and fondling another 'nurse', took a break from her carnal preoccupations to apply a tourniquet to my arm in an attempt to get a vein to stand up long enough to insert an I.V.
I had almost no blood pressure, and I watched her repeated attempts to skewer me fail, as the vein would instantly rupture and flatten with each attempt. So I tried to relay to her an observation made by a paramedic while I was still in the ambulance, that a tourniquet was a really bad idea...

She became angry and defensive, by way of proving to me that she was an expert and I was an idiot, while another 'nurse' came storming around the curtain yelling at me something about what an asshole I was.
Whereupon two swat-team members, festooned with handcuffs and clubs began pacing to and fro at the foot of my bed, casting hateful glares in my direction.

Clearly, whether one is at death's door, or not, one is still expected, before any other consideration, to behave 'nicely' to everyone. Social posturing has become even more important than survival.

Hard to equate any of that with the notion of 'care'.
I more or less decided, then and there, than rather than ever go for a hospital-experience again, it would be somewhat preferable simply to die quietly at home.


NHA

Re: Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 09:16:36 PM
Quote
I have a little gas-powered generator that advertises itself as being able to deliver 950 watts. After having it fail to live up to expectations for the nine millionth time, I undertook to measure its actual output. My ability to measure such things is a bit limited, but even so, I estimate that it can provide a peak output of somewhere around 700 watts momentarily, before dropping off to a mean output of around 400 watts.

It's safe to assume the technical specs on the back of any product are written by the marketing department, and are consequently guaranteed to be complete bullshit, or at best, full of partial-truths and distortions.

Re: Cheap Shit.
February 28, 2014, 10:55:15 PM
She became angry and defensive, by way of proving to me that she was an expert and I was an idiot, while another 'nurse' came storming around the curtain yelling at me something about what an asshole I was.
Whereupon two swat-team members, festooned with handcuffs and clubs began pacing to and fro at the foot of my bed, casting hateful glares in my direction.

Sounds like a lot of defensive denial going on and it is institutionalized. Hospital security are apparently there to protect the staff from the patients. That would seem to deny that a given patient could possibly take issue with the staff or the establishment who have put themselves beyond reproach.

It parallels with the Dunning and Kruger effect. The incompetent don't have the means to evaluate their own lack of ability so their tendency is to overestimate themselves. Entire institutions it would seem and eventually whole societies succumb to this mental defect.

Re: Cheap Shit.
March 02, 2014, 01:18:50 AM
A favorite gripe of mine: cheap shit, the illusion of "value".

Problem is that people will buy into what is advertised,and cheap shit is more readily available where most of the masses shop.

On one hand, if fucktards prefer to buy twenty cheap brooms over their lifetime than buy a good broomstic that costs five times as much but lasts forever, that is their probelm. Other hand, consumption of cheap shit, while perhaps a staple of our modern economy, is harming the environment. Above all, this serves as a reminder of how mindless and apathetic we have become, at least in the US.