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Meditations on crowded peaks

Meditations on crowded peaks
April 09, 2014, 10:57:17 PM
Quote
The Himalayas lead us to a nonhuman purity, to a nonhuman breath: “Many meters above sea level – but how many more above ordinary man!” wrote Nietzsche about Sils-Maria. This peak, just like the highest Italian mountain reconnects us to our natural and cosmic nature, which is the same as that of the elemental forces of the earth, the powerful purity and calm of which is impressed upon the icy and shining peaks as if they were absolute and immaterial peaks, or magnetic rhythmical knots in the grat plot of the whole.

-Julius Evola on Meditations on the peaks

Friedrich Nietzsche and Julius Evola recognized the power of the mountain, and its ability to develop consciousness. The struggle against the heights, the weather, and our own insecurities is the means by wich the transcendence happens. It’s through this heroic experience that one lives in reality – fully detached from all things human.

Now imagine the settlement of crowds in the very top of the world. Imagine them storming the purity of the everest and taking over the seats of walhalla. That is a hell of a vision, but it’s real.

Some say that climbing everest is a life changing experience. Surely, not anymore. On May 19, 2012, two hundred thirty four people reached the Mount Everest summit. That is the marvellous works of progress and leftism: the dumbing down and bastardization of experience to make it possible for everyone to climb there.

Maybe one day, there will be a spa.



Links:

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/06/125-everest-maxed-out/everest-photography#/01-hilary-step-580v.jpg

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/06/125-everest-maxed-out/jenkins-text

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 09, 2014, 11:04:18 PM
Majestic mountains have a different effect upon different people.
Some 'conquer' them. Only their own egos expand, at the cost of their consciousness.
Others become dwarfed by them, sinking into them, and becoming one with them.
Their consciousness expands, at the cost of their egos.
The mountain, meanwhile, remains impassive.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 04:25:19 PM
Some say that climbing everest is a life changing experience. Surely, not anymore. On May 19, 2012, two hundred thirty four people reached the Mount Everest summit. That is the marvellous works of progress and leftism: the dumbing down and bastardization of experience to make it possible for everyone to climb there.

Agree with the general or reverence, but for a fucking manic sidebar related to the "dumbing down" bit:

Huh? What? The "sanctity" of other people climbing the mountain is less of a feat than the first to do so, yes. This is what humanity - LIFE - does, and always has done. The ground you're standing on, in no doubt a thoroughly civilized area (suburb, rural area, city, college campus, etc) was once virgin nature. All of it. Everywhere.

Be the first person on Mars (gasp - another planet! Somehow unnatural! Somehow unknown to 20th century reactionaries!) and stop your bitching. The alternative is to continue to live your life as you have, in the hopes your children's children will pathologically worship such a corpse, so damning themselves to a life of paranoid inaction.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 04:41:57 PM
A life of what you call 'paranoid inaction' would go a long way towards eliminating the thoroughly destructive kind of post you, and those like you, have just made, and will likely continue to make.
It is an unfortunate characteristic of humanity that so many of its 'members' are so prone to gratuitously rip into each other for no clear reason.



Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 04:45:11 PM
A life of what you call 'paranoid inaction' would go a long way towards eliminating the thoroughly destructive kind of post you, and those like you, have just made, and will likely continue to make.
It is an unfortunate characteristic of humanity that so many of its 'members' are so prone to gratuitously rip into each other for no clear reason.

There are many kinds of pain. Destruction is a cosmic virtue. As you know, nothing exists in a vacuum.

Sing praise to the Hermetic pillar, Caduceus. Antithesis, for Spring:


Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 04:48:32 PM
Destruction is never a virtue. It exists, and that is that. Thinking of it as virtuous is just plain nuts.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 05:16:46 PM
Virtue: ...from Latin virtutem (nominative virtus) "moral strength, high character, goodness; manliness; valor, bravery, courage (in war); excellence, worth," from vir "man" (see virile).

Moral: ...coined by Cicero ("De Fato," II.i) to translate Greek ethikos (see ethics) from Latin mos (genitive moris) "one's disposition," in plural, "mores, customs, manners, morals," of uncertain origin. Perhaps sharing a PIE root with English mood (n.1).

Ethos: revived by Palgrave in 1851 from Greek ethos "moral character, nature, disposition, habit, custom," from suffixed form of PIE root *s(w)e- (see idiom). An important concept in Aristotle (e.g. "Rhetoric" II xii-xiv).

Idiom: "form of speech peculiar to a people or place," from Middle French idiome (16c.) and directly from Late Latin idioma "a peculiarity in language," from Greek idioma "peculiarity, peculiar phraseology," from idioumai "to appropriate to oneself," from idios "personal, private," properly "particular to oneself," from PIE *swed-yo-, suffixed form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (referring back to the subject of a sentence), also used in forms denoting the speaker's social group, "(we our-)selves" (cognates: Sanskrit svah, Avestan hva-, Old Persian huva "one's own," khva-data "lord," literally "created from oneself;" Greek hos "he, she, it;" Latin suescere "to accustom, get accustomed," sodalis "companion;" Old Church Slavonic svoji "his, her, its," svojaku "relative, kinsman;" Gothic swes "one's own;" Old Norse sik "oneself;" German Sein; Old Irish fein "self, himself"). Meaning "phrase or expression peculiar to a language" is from 1620s.

/\\/

A dragon for the ages!

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 05:37:26 PM
Do you get all your information elsewhere? What do you do with it? What does it mean to you?
Does it, in any way, contribute to the quality of your life?
Re: your last comment: was there something communicable in it? A point? A message?
I was unable to detect one.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 10, 2014, 11:45:17 PM
Quote
Huh? What? The "sanctity" of other people climbing the mountain is less of a feat than the first to do so, yes. This is what humanity - LIFE - does, and always has done. The ground you're standing on, in no doubt a thoroughly civilized area (suburb, rural area, city, college campus, etc) was once virgin nature. All of it. Everywhere.

Be the first person on Mars (gasp - another planet! Somehow unnatural! Somehow unknown to 20th century reactionaries!) and stop your bitching. The alternative is to continue to live your life as you have, in the hopes your children's children will pathologically worship such a corpse, so damning themselves to a life of paranoid inaction.
Posted by: Annihilation


The post had a purpose, but you managed to invert it completely. I congratulate your efforts in the misrepresentation of something so simple as this:

1) When you climb a mountain, you have the opportunity to experience the growth of your spiritual awareness. The means for this are obvious, and they all involve danger and uncertainty.

2) The foundations of authentic experience are rooted in that; To achieve it you need to overcome those elements of danger and uncertainty.

3) When you remove that, what is left? Those people are climbing amateurs, who by a sudden desire wanted to climb everest, and then, instead of going by themselves, pay thousands of dollars to a guide to take them to the summit. Where is the challenge, when you have a guy who are responsible for every decision? You become a tourist, with a passive role in all that, missing all the important things of that experience.

4) It did not matter who are first or second, or if the ground is virgin - the important here is the experience.
 

The rest of the post seems to be clear enough...

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 11, 2014, 12:26:48 AM
It's encouraging to know at least one other person suffers from inversion of meaning.
That was beautifully and clearly put. Thank you.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 11, 2014, 01:10:03 AM
It reminded me of when I climbed the Mount Washington (New Hampshire). At the summit, where you could went in car, Some fat kids would got out of it to pose near the summit sign post and then rush back to the car because they where in t-shirt and it was cold. I had climbed it by foot and I was almost in winter suit thought it was still in the end of summer. It was a funny contrast. 

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 15, 2014, 03:42:59 PM

The post had a purpose, but you managed to invert it completely.

There's no such inversion. Point for point, tit for tat. We're spending the same time talking mountains. I agree that people ruin things, and there's varieties of cosmic alignment among folks. There's no point trying to "go beyond" what's been said, at least in your way.

Quote
Do you get all your information elsewhere? What do you do with it? What does it mean to you?
Does it, in any way, contribute to the quality of your life?
Re: your last comment: was there something communicable in it? A point? A message?
I was unable to detect one.

Where is elsewhere? Where is yours, sir? Quality of life exists in all things. Communicated, and communicable. Pain and ecstasy exist as two sides of the same coin, as with intention and disorder. Space reveals itself over time - what is cryptic and what is explicit? Chuang-Tzu, your friend, was said to have said something about that.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 15, 2014, 03:43:39 PM
THE question, then: what's left to discuss?

Courtesy, of course. I'll show myself out!

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 15, 2014, 03:50:36 PM
Here's something:
I have observed that when ego-filled people 'conquer' a peak, they take their egos up with them, and give full vent to them at the top. The mountain does not diminish the ego. Rather it inflates it even more.
While the humble ascend, at a graceful pace, and are humbled more by the ascendant position they reach.
The mountain serves to amplify. For better, or worse.

Re: Meditations on crowded peaks
April 15, 2014, 03:55:10 PM
Here's something:
I have observed that when ego-filled people 'conquer' a peak, they take their egos up with them, and give full vent to them at the top. The mountain does not diminish the ego. Rather it inflates it even more.
While the humble ascend, at a graceful pace, and are humbled more by the ascendant position they reach.
The mountain serves to amplify. For better, or worse.

Hah! Well put!