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Strength Training

Re: Strength Training
January 30, 2011, 01:06:54 PM
I've always shunned weight machines. They over specialize muscle groups and often neglect the core strength foundation. It is somewhat like armored windows installed in a straw house. It is better to have general, lasting body strength that continues years after the sessions have stopped.

Re: Strength Training
February 02, 2011, 06:06:07 PM
I haven't really read the 5x5 "plan," because I don't really weight train any more, but let me offer this.  I think the general idea of 5x5 is good in the sense that it's low-rep, free weights that builds core strength.  Deadlift, Squat, and Bench really are the cornerstones of strength training and I would add Power Clean but with a little less emphasis than the "big 3."  When I trained, it was for athletic performance, so let me preface what I'm about to say with that.  I think that ultimately doing 5x5 over and over is too "static."  When I trained it was 4 sets of the following reps: 1st week: warmup/10/8/6, 2nd week: warmup/5/5/5, 3rd week: warmup/3/3/3, 4th week: warmup/5/3/1........and then you start back at week 1.  The whole goal of this was to increase your MAX ONE REP.  Also, I only lifted 3 days a week, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and I only did ONE of the "big 3" lifts on any given day.  So Monday would be bench, Wed. - deadlift, Fri. - squat.  let me make this clear, I think it's a bad idea to be deadlifting, benching, and squatting all on the same day.  Instead, mix in other free weight lifts like incline bench, hang clean or even pull ups or dips.  For your legs, I actually think weight machines are good, if you wanna get really good at squat, you should really do your leg extensions and leg curls.  Another thing we did, that I'm not as sure about anymore, is we had these 2 "half-lifts" for bench and squat, we rolled up a towel and put it on our chests for bench, when we benched this way, we put on more weight, but we didn't get the full range of motion, and with squat we actually put a little box/stool under our butts and didn't go all the way down to parallel (almost, though).  The idea of this is to get used to how heavy heavy weight feels.  Now it might seem like a hare-brained idea, but I really thought the coach who ran the weight room knew what he was doing.  Let me put it this way, after all these years, I, personally, have no back problems from doing box squat, but I am somewhat hesitant to recommend this because you really do need to be in perfect form when resting all that weight on you lower back when you sit on the stool.

Finally a point about diet:  I had really good success with something called the ZIG-ZAG diet.  It's really simple, on Mon. Wed. Fri. (or whenever your "big" workout is) you eat more, a lot more than usual, in fact, (maybe 1.5 times what you usually eat), but then on your "off" days or "small" workout days you eat much less (maybe .75 times your usual caloric intake).  The zig zag really jump starts your metabolism.  It's hard as hell to lose weight and gain strength, but I thought this diet at least gave me a fighting chance.

Again, my approach to lifting is really based on what will help athletic performance, so keep that in mind.  Also, once you start squatting or deadlifting major weight, you are going to need to do these little annoying exercises, like "Supermans" (we called 'em), where you hang over a bench type thing with a weight behind your head, and you lift your torso up to parallel with the ground.  This will strengthen those little, hardly-used muscles in your lower back.  Because if you just concentrate on the main lifts, and you get really strong at them, but you don't help those smaller muscles out, you're cruising for an injury or perpetual back pain in your old age.

Re: Strength Training
February 03, 2011, 10:13:42 PM

One important thing to note when using protein powders is that many contain very high doses of heavy metals.

I've never heard of it but maybe true.

Many protein powders they come from shitty cows and the whey is not purified well. Companies like B.S.N. (makers of N.O. Xplode drink), Muscle Milk, etc spend millions in marketing and the money they have left over is used to buy raw materials and to manufacture shitty proteins. That is why CASEIN PROTEIN got popular: cheap, gunky protein that sticks in your bowels. They used to make glue out of CASEIN PROTEIN. Watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/user/rickmartis1#p/u/11/0F_qRsi_cug

So, in the end, purchasing the right protein can be a difficult choice. In my opinion, I think buying from smaller companies will provide you with the cleanest product (BIOPLEX, ISOPURE, and others). Try www.trueprotein.com To create your own unique blend.

Re: Strength Training
February 03, 2011, 10:15:47 PM
I've always shunned weight machines. They over specialize muscle groups and often neglect the core strength foundation. It is somewhat like armored windows installed in a straw house. It is better to have general, lasting body strength that continues years after the sessions have stopped.

There is a great point. Machines aren't ENTIRELY bad, but I seriously doubt you all are "pro" body builders so stay away from them. Isolation exercises are to sculpt your muscles finely. Worry about that later. Till now, heavy compound lifts and turn your body into a titan.

Re: Strength Training
February 03, 2011, 10:23:02 PM
I think that ultimately doing 5x5 over and over is too "static." Also, I only lifted 3 days a week, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and I only did ONE of the "big 3" lifts on any given day.  So Monday would be bench, Wed. - deadlift, Fri. - squat.  let me make this clear, I think it's a bad idea to be deadlifting, benching, and squatting all on the same day.  

Finally a point about diet:  I had really good success with something called the ZIG-ZAG diet.  

Remember, the goal here is to gain, like you said, solid core strength and to proportion your body well so that you don't have muscle imbalance (ever seen a skinny legged chicken at the gym? fucking retarded).

If this is to static for some of you, well then add more weight. That's a challenge. "Muscle confusion" should be shocked when you add more weight.

I follow the ZIG ZAG diet now. No need to bombard myself like how I used to.

Two rules: Want to get big, eat! Getting too big, eat less!

Golden rule for hard gainers (the super skinny guys): GOMAD! "Gallon of Milk a Day". The oldest trick in the book to gain fast weight and MUSCLE. Some call it the "Squat and Milk" program. Super old school.

Re: Strength Training
February 03, 2011, 10:36:20 PM
Also, believe me. I know how hard say, doing squats and benching the same day or deadlifts and military pressing the same day. Before I thought I was strong since I looked farily scuplted and "pumped" from doing my two body parts per day routine. But I wasn't as strong as I thought I was. So, I struggled extensively for about 5 months till one day these power routines became my life.

So, hang in there for you hard gainers. When you get to the gym, be prepared. Make sure you've eaten within the last two hours and are caught up on sleep. Make sure to educate yourself too. Also, Don't look at anyone. Everyone else loves to look at each other with envious or judging eyes. Fuck them. Just grab the barbell and yell, grunt, curse, andwill you get stronger Takes awhile but you know...as they say, good things come with time!

One more thing. Who here likes to work out with headphones?

Sometimes I do and it works, especially when I need a good pick me up. Other times, the noise makes me dizzy.

Re: Strength Training
February 04, 2011, 05:10:15 AM
Also, believe me. I know how hard say, doing squats and benching the same day or deadlifts and military pressing the same day. Before I thought I was strong since I looked farily scuplted and "pumped" from doing my two body parts per day routine. But I wasn't as strong as I thought I was. So, I struggled extensively for about 5 months till one day these power routines became my life.

So, hang in there for you hard gainers. When you get to the gym, be prepared. Make sure you've eaten within the last two hours and are caught up on sleep. Make sure to educate yourself too. Also, Don't look at anyone. Everyone else loves to look at each other with envious or judging eyes. Fuck them. Just grab the barbell and yell, grunt, curse, andwill you get stronger Takes awhile but you know...as they say, good things come with time!

One more thing. Who here likes to work out with headphones?

Sometimes I do and it works, especially when I need a good pick me up. Other times, the noise makes me dizzy.

I've been neglecting my workout for the past few weeks (personal and other business has gotten in the way), but I must say I always do enjoy exercising at the gym with headphones on. Often, the gym will play annoying top 40 music and the various nobodies will chat about meaningless things, so headphones are a good way to drown out the noise. BLACK METAL POWERLIFTING.

It's also important I think to have a light snack after working out (fruit works great for this); helps to fill the hunger void you may have while not really gaining much of the weight back.

Once my life becomes less turbulent I plan on going back to my gym. Until then, I stretch and do other basic exercises at work and home.

Re: Strength Training
February 04, 2011, 06:40:37 AM
I find that exercising at the gym is mechanical enough that it's one of the few times of the week that I can actually put music on and really listen to it, without really having to concentrate on anything else.  Simple but potentially difficult physical activities are fantastic for splitting the mind from the body - tell the brain to give your muscles a task, and then (figuratively) sit back and enjoy the music.

Re: Strength Training
February 04, 2011, 10:33:35 AM

BLACK METAL POWERLIFTING.

It's also important I think to have a light snack after working out (fruit works great for this); helps to fill the hunger void you may have while not really gaining much of the weight back.


NEWER GRAVELAND has always been the band of choice to pump me up. More recently, the latest HACAVITZ (MEXICO) has worked reallly well too. I put my headphones on, grab the barbell, and destroy.

Light snack? Never. Your body is begging for large doses of macronutrients.

After trudging into my front door after a hellish workout, I usually down a mix of 12 ounces of rice milk with  ~40 grams protein isolate,and frozen blueberries. This lasts me for about 3 hrs. 

Re: Strength Training
February 04, 2011, 10:34:54 AM
I find that exercising at the gym is mechanical enough that it's one of the few times of the week that I can actually put music on and really listen to it, without really having to concentrate on anything else.  Simple but potentially difficult physical activities are fantastic for splitting the mind from the body - tell the brain to give your muscles a task, and then (figuratively) sit back and enjoy the music.

I agree. For a a nice sonic experience, lift weights and listen to DEAD CAN DANCE.

Re: Strength Training
February 04, 2011, 11:36:50 AM
Many protein powders they come from shitty cows and the whey is not purified well. Companies like B.S.N. (makers of N.O. Xplode drink), Muscle Milk, etc spend millions in marketing and the money they have left over is used to buy raw materials and to manufacture shitty proteins. That is why CASEIN PROTEIN got popular: cheap, gunky protein that sticks in your bowels. They used to make glue out of CASEIN PROTEIN. Watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/user/rickmartis1#p/u/11/0F_qRsi_cug
It might be a good idea to take a shot of Aloe Vera Juice before drinking a protein shake. It'll lube up your bowels so they don't get encrusted with slop.

Rot

Re: Strength Training
February 04, 2011, 11:40:44 AM
http://www.chaosandpain.com/ this is one of the best lifting sites on the internet, I struggled for years from bad advice and this guy set me straight
This guy seems like he thinks he's really cool and really funny, but is really not (one might say he "fails" if one is a dipshit). He says he watches porn and he feels the need to include fuck in every article and every other paragraph and make extreme manly jokes about thinking its fun to watch women cry and how soccer is for little kids. I might as well go read The Best Page in The Universe because at least it doesn't have the pretense of being a helpful guide for strength training. Here are some of his insightful tips taken from his "10 commandments":

"Stop worrying about your form, already. Brute strength will get you pretty fucking far. The more weight you lift, the more strength you'll gain, and the bigger you'll get."

"For the love of all that's unholy, eat as much protein as you can.  Fuck Joe Weider and his high carb nonsense - if you eat like a caveman, you'll look like one.  Feel free to post all of the links you want about how Cro-Magnons and Neanderthals apparently ate grains - they ate MINUTE amounts of grains at best"

"Your genetics are not your greatest limitation - your mind is"

For people who don't care to read a 20 year old go off like he's John Madden: http://www.scoobysworkshop.com/

I'd have to agree with you on all that but I've had phenomenal strength gains from following his advice

Re: Strength Training
December 06, 2011, 02:06:03 PM
All you need: Wendler's 5/3/1 (book)

In sum: the 3 Big Lifts + Military Press, with a flexible periodization cycle (1-4 times a week, 4+ week-long cycles), working up to a 1RM followed by a deload period for recovery. Over time, this leads to huge long-term gains - allowing for monthly increases of +5lb for bench and military press, +10lb squat and deadlift. Do the math.

All you need is a spot in your basement, a $200 starter's olympic weight set, 5/3/1, goals, and patience.


Re: Strength Training
December 07, 2011, 06:15:09 AM
Shame on me that I have been enjoying beer, great beer at that for the last month, but I have been making great progress especially my shoulders and chest. My weakest is my lower back and abs. This is where discipline and fucking getting down to business really comes into play. I am not strong as I would like but I have been doing this for 5 months thus far.

Another thought came in to my mind as to why I decided to start back up again after years. Health was my number one reason but I also realized that with that if done right, you gain much more. Confidence is surely one of them, and the discipline and drive is another. Fuck it, I do not need to get big so I can prance around and show off. Stupid indeed. Instead I will use the strength and discipline to use in martial arts training.

Diet is very important but that goes unsaid really. You have to know your body well, and to help that, you have to know your body type. I myself gain muscle quickly, but fat can be an issue if I do not watch out. That is why my diet is high protein, high fat and low carbs. The high fats of course being healthy ones such as olive oil and almond oil. I use omega 3,6,9 fish oil to supplement that.  Carbs are needed for energy but they have to be complex such as oatmeal, potatoes, and especially yams. Protein is your friend and getting it from all sources is great for building muscles. You body only produces a certain amount of amino acids so different sources provides you with the keys to building muscle. I use a post work out BCAA to help with this. I do use protein powder, and I have not heard of this metal issue as of yet.

And of course water! Drinking water is key to flush out all the free radicals that can occur during work out sessions. I can not recall the name of this situation, but it is one reason why you need lots of water. The other of course is that you muscles are made of water. On days you eat more carbs you look bigger because you are putting more water into you muscles. That is why every four days I must have a carb day that is high protein, high carbs and very low fat.

This is where my time has been spent lately and the reason I have not posted, but this is an excellent post in which I feel confident enough to express my knowledge. Honestly at 31 I feel  better then at 21! Not too shabby!
 

Re: Strength Training
April 20, 2014, 11:25:42 AM
How to Get Strong and How to Stay So, by William Blaikie

Quote from: Preface
Millions of our people pass their lives in cities and towns, and at work which keeps them nearly all day in-doors. Many hours are devoted for days and years, under careful teachers, and many millions of dollars are spent annually, in educating the mind and the moral nature. But the body is allowed to grow up all uneducated; indeed, often such a weak, shaky affair that it gets easily out of order, especially in middle and later life, and its owner is wholly unequal to tasks which would have proved easy to him, had he given it even a tithe of the education bestowed so generously in other directions. Not a few, to be sure, have the advantage in youth of years of active out-door life on a farm, and so lay up a store of vigor which stands them in good stead throughout a lifetime. But many, and especially those born and reared in towns and cities, have had no such training, or any equivalent, and so never have the developed lungs and muscles, the strong heart and vigorous digestion—in short, the improved tone and strength in all their vital organs—which any sensible plan of body-culture, followed up daily, would have secured. It does not matter so much whether we get vigor on the farm, the deck, the tow-path, or in the gymnasium, if we only get it. Fortunately, if not gotten in youth, when we are plastic and easily shaped, it may still be had, even far on in middle life, by judicious and systematic exercise, aimed first to bring up the weak and unused parts, and then by general work daily which shall maintain the equal development of the whole.

The aim here has been, not to write a profound treatise on gymnastics, and point out how to eventually reach great performance in this art, but rather in a way so plain and untechnical that even any intelligent boy or girl can readily understand it, to first give the reader a nudge to take better care of his body, and so of his health, and then to point out one way to do it. That there are a hundred other ways is cheerfully conceded. If anything said here should stir up some to vigorously take hold of, and faithfully follow up, either the plan here indicated or any one of these others, it cannot fail to bring them marked benefit, and so to gratify the author.

Advice and motivation from the late 19th Century on the fundamental importance of maintaining physical vigor and health. A bit repetitive, but stirring. Worth reading, if not skimming.

Read it for free here or here.