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Re-casting Metal: Rhythm and Meter in the Music of Meshuggah

For those interested in a more technical analysis. Independently of if you like this band or not, this is educational material.
From the beginning of the article it is clear that the author himself thinks that the value of the band's music lies more in socio-cultural activities. The music has little value in itself.  Now, I think a lot of modern sociologists think this about all music... I say they don't understand music enough. As far as the people I've met are concerned, classical performance majors in general understand the inherent value and meaning of music far better than the the musicologists and other pure analysts. Most composition major students or professional composers nowadays tend to be technical wankers or stout utilitarians as well. I've been able to connect better with performers in terms of my views about music, maybe because in their case, they must live and channel the music through their "souls" and bodies.

I am interested in some of the author's last remarks:

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individuality and originality are highly prized in this subgenre, and bands frequently develop idiosyncratic musical practices to assert individuality.

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During interviews, fans consistently emphasize the technical aspects of the music as a source, if not the source, of attraction.
1

Meshuggah does not make music, it makes rhythmic exercises that attract "sophisticated" people because they "get it". Combined with the first statement this also tells me that this music is all about standing out in any way possible, it's essentially music for posturing.
Just like what the writer of the SMR says about Sotajumala and metalcore:
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Itís like a politician who makes speeches about how he organizes files in his office.


http://www.scribd.com/doc/6375990/Re-casting-Metal-Rhythm-and-Meter-in-the-Music-of-Meshuggah]Re-casting Metal: Rhythm and Meter in the Music of Meshuggah


by Jonathan Pieslak

from the Music Theory Spectrum journal