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Influences that formed death metal

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 21, 2007, 10:12:24 AM
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"Hello this is me...the one and only!....the bastard! the one that does not care what you think or want? This is me! the beginning!!! The One that broke all the rulez...It's me the one who woke up one day? and said to myself? Hey? let there be changes! Let there be Speed!!! Unlimited!!! ...and so? it all started there.....with me; but then there were more?....Hundreds and hundreds will follow the same road! The one I proudly created!!! back on the middle of 85'!Ummmmmmm? wow!! over 20 damn yrs. ago? Wow!! what A Godfather of this genre! I have become! :))!! Fuck Yeaaahhhh!!!What a hard long road to the top this has being!! and still not there yet? well? So long you all!! and remember?? there are no rulez!...not one to brake.......or is it????... "NO PAIN NO GAIN" I say....."

- Pete Sandoval

http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=31638456

(Clearly Pete Sandoval has contracted HIV)





Sounds more like he's extremely drunk. He tends to be when he says stupid shit like that. I once saw an interview of him where he claimed that he invented blast beats. He was clearly intoxicated though. It seemed he was going to fall out of his chair. Still, i don't think he really said that. the myspace didn't mention it was the official myspace site anywhere.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 21, 2007, 05:12:56 PM
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Sounds more like he's extremely drunk. He tends to be when he says stupid shit like that. I once saw an interview of him where he claimed that he invented blast beats. He was clearly intoxicated though. It seemed he was going to fall out of his chair. Still, i don't think he really said that. the myspace didn't mention it was the official myspace site anywhere.


Yeah, I think Pete was on some kind of drugs when he said this. I mean, who the hell talks like this when they aren't on something mind-altering?

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 21, 2007, 09:52:50 PM
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You did explain the link, but I think they carry the grindcore influence in the drums on all their albums.


They certainly do, in a general sense.  It just seemed less apparent on "Blessed" (the inclusion of a lot of older, mid-paced tracks being one reason).

Annihilaytorr

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 21, 2007, 10:18:40 PM
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They certainly do, in a general sense.  It just seemed less apparent on "Blessed" (the inclusion of a lot of older, mid-paced tracks being one reason).



I see exactly what you mean. I always prefered the drum sound on Altars over Blessed, especially during the fast parts. Sounded more barbaric and chaotic.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 22, 2007, 05:10:47 PM
I overtly curious as to how the ambient music is manifested in dm. I mean it would be nice if you could show some specific examples (bands, more explanation on the similiar technique and such).

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 22, 2007, 11:35:32 PM
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I overtly curious as to how the ambient music is manifested in dm. I mean it would be nice if you could show some specific examples (bands, more explanation on the similiar technique and such).


Let's take "Blessed Are the Sick" by Morbid Angel. Besides the ambient interludes, and Trey's obvious fascination with Dead Can Dance (themselves Tangerine Dream fanatics) and Laibach and other avant-industrial acts, look at the way the songs are written. They open with a quick attack, repeat themselves over verse chorus, and then halve their speed in many cases to go through something both unrelated and similar to the original riffs. All the keyboard music came out in the 1970s and that's what these guys heard as kids. It's uncannily similar often.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 23, 2007, 12:35:56 AM
I think Morbid Angel might owe this more to the proggier side of musical happenings in the 70s than they would the ambient stuff - I know for a fact Trey has mentioned Pink Floyd's spacier moments as an influence. I'm going to assume any stylistic similarities between Tangerine Dream and Morbid Angel were arrived at independently, though I don't doubt that there would be some common ground in terms of artistic motivation.

The 60s and 70s kicked off an ongoing crosspollination between the classical (the standard repertory in general, but electroacoustic music and minimalism in particular) and popular spheres, so alot of the who-influenced-who game is largely speculative - insightful articles and interviews are a bit hard to dredge up.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 24, 2007, 12:33:09 AM
The link below may give you all a better idea of what the motivations behind, "Blessed are the Sick" were.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=uacudMFvZfA


Annihilaytorr

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 24, 2007, 02:01:48 AM
That interview rules. I linked to it a couple days ago in that Chuck thread.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 24, 2007, 02:12:11 AM
Yeah, Trey may have sounded like a skater dropout, but he was/is obviously intelligent. Can't say the same thing about Sandoval going by that inane ranting on his gayspace.

I really enjoy Trey's interviews, and that 1990 MA rehearsal video on youtube is awesome too.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 24, 2007, 02:48:59 PM
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Morbid Angel was pre-grind and almost purely death metal.

Deathgrind came after Suffocation, mostly, and was a middle 1990s thing.

Grindcore is over-fucking-rated. There are four good bands, maybe, and the rest are caffeinated punk.



Death/Grind certainly came before Suffocation. I don't think I could call bands like Atrocity (US), Dead Horse, Blood (Ger) and Nausea (US) "caffeinated punk" but there was certainly a crossover/punk influence.

Annihilaytorr

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 24, 2007, 03:44:45 PM
Death/Grind isn't really the best term, as Grind in itself has always been included and a part of the Death Metal realm. Repulsion consider themselves part of the first wave of DM bands, and were seen in that context from day one. Terrorizer has riffs borrowed from Scream Bloody Gore as it has riffs borrowed from Scum as it has riffs borrowed from Nothing See Nothing Say Nothing.

The idea that Suffocation being the first Death/Grind hybrid was popular among young brutal-death listeners, and went so far as to be included on their page at one time on M-A.  I wonder why this myth keeps perpetuating itself.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 25, 2007, 09:59:01 PM
It doesn't make sense to talk of death/grind hybrids, since both were born out of the same idea (Discharge, crust) and took it in their own directions.

Suffocation was the first blasting death metal band, but they owed as much to Exodus and Metallica as to grindcore.

History is crap if you let uninformed people write it.

Annihilaytorr

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 26, 2007, 12:10:49 AM
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History is crap if you let uninformed people write it.


I agree, but it's funny you say that Born, especially considering Suffocation wasn't the first blasting Death Metal band.

Re: Influences that formed death metal
April 26, 2007, 01:22:55 AM
Trey Azagthoth does seem to have a penchant for being overtly poignant and honest in interviews (at least the early ones).  There's an interesting rehearsal bootleg from the mid-80's in which he first hears Pete Sandoval's blast beats from a Terrorizer demo and says something to the effect of "I've NEVER heard anything like that before!" before going on to mention what he thinks they're good for, all in awe.  Although clearly not the god father of blast beats that he often dubs himself as, I have yet to hear that style of drumming as refined as Sandoval's performance was on World Downfall prior to its release (double bass tinkering notwithstanding).

Anyway, this thread would be hopelessly incomplete without the mention of Masters like Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, ect. as influences.  If nothing else, most every founding death metal act seemed to have at least been aware of the sheer depth and massiveness of seminal classical pieces and saw it fit to emulate that sense in their own music; other musicians, as the Azagthoth interview indicates, took the influence much more directly.