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Why popular things often suck

Why popular things often suck
April 17, 2007, 11:08:23 PM
There's an interesting, if not altogether surprising,
article written by a professor who recently did a
study on "cumulative advantage" which suggests,
effectively, that popularity begets more popularity.
On its own, this shouldn't surprise anyone. We all
know that once something starts to get popular, word
of mouth discussions and just the fact that people
tend to hear or see that thing more often tends to
expand the market even further. The study done by the
researchers suggests that there's quite a bit of
randomness involved. They found that hit songs tend to
become hits almost by accident (which probably won't
make the folks at Hit Song Science very happy).
Basically, once a song catches on, it tends to
snowball into popularity -- whether or not it's
actually any good. As the author notes, this has many
different implications.

http://techdirt.com/articles/20070416/013114.shtml

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 18, 2007, 07:44:39 AM
Translation : most people are nonsensical.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 18, 2007, 03:19:53 PM
The Crazy Frog was an awesome song, are you saying it was just a gimmick and marketing that sold this song?

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 18, 2007, 03:56:32 PM
Quote
are you saying it was just a gimmick and marketing that sold this song?


Both that and the people's own will to listen to it ; but nothing tells me that this will is based upon anything coherent or relevant.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 19, 2007, 02:05:50 AM
Popular things (movies, songs, books) suck because of mainstream society's cultivated stupidity, anything that gets played on the radio on a constant basis is judged by the dumb masses as "art".
The same goes for books or movies for that matter. If for example, Stephen King or Fangoria says that something like the Texas Chainsaw Massacre remake is good, the majority in a democratic society wil suck it up.
Popularity is needed for a healthy consumerist world where music or movies are disposable as adult diapers. Which is why CNN and the mainstream media do not interest me in the goddamn least.

Annihilaytorr

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 19, 2007, 03:51:05 AM
Quote

I think some bands can fit in the first category, the ones which are very respected and very popular, such as Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Metallica etc..  You can't help but feel that you can appreciate it more than the common man, though...



Well said Metalist.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 19, 2007, 10:00:16 PM
Quote
I still find "lowest common denominator" to be the best paradigm to explain why popular things suck.


What he's saying in the article is that popularity gains momentum. People see what other people are doing, and imitate it, assuming others have more wisdom. That's how lowest common denominator comes around.


Re: Why popular things often suck
April 20, 2007, 10:02:02 AM
Quote
People see what other people are doing, and imitate it, assuming others have more wisdom.


That denotes a lack of confidence in oneself.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 20, 2007, 07:42:35 PM
Quote

That denotes a lack of confidence in oneself.


Consequences of an overly externalized, materialistic, aspiritual society.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 21, 2007, 11:48:43 AM
Quote
There's an interesting, if not altogether surprising,
article written by a professor who recently did a
study on "cumulative advantage" which suggests,
effectively, that popularity begets more popularity.


Saw this on the in2christ list:

In 1970, American economist George Akerlof wrote a paper called "The Market for 'Lemons'" (abstract and article for pay here), which established asymmetrical information theory. He eventually won a Nobel Prize for his work, which looks at markets where the seller knows a lot more about the product than the buyer.

Akerlof illustrated his ideas with a used car market. A used car market includes both good cars and lousy ones (lemons). The seller knows which is which, but the buyer can't tell the difference -- at least until he's made his purchase. I'll spare you the math, but what ends up happening is that the buyer bases his purchase price on the value of a used car of average quality.

This means that the best cars don't get sold; their prices are too high. Which means that the owners of these best cars don't put their cars on the market. And then this starts spiraling. The removal of the good cars from the market reduces the average price buyers are willing to pay, and then the very good cars no longer sell, and disappear from the market. And then the good cars, and so on until only the lemons are left.

http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2007/04/securitymatters_0419?currentPage=all

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 21, 2007, 03:55:30 PM
I don't think price has much to do with what kind of cds peopel buy. If anything the youth today likes to show off how spoiled they are by showing off all the useless, overpriced their parents buy for them, so it would be opposite for music, for teens at least. Price isnt' a big factor in music purchases anyways because as far as i'm aware, all cds cost about the same amount. Interesting article nevertheless.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 25, 2007, 05:03:10 AM
Quote
Akerlof illustrated his ideas with a used car market. A used car market includes both good cars and lousy ones (lemons). The seller knows which is which, but the buyer can't tell the difference -- at least until he's made his purchase. I'll spare you the math, but what ends up happening is that the buyer bases his purchase price on the value of a used car of average quality.

This means that the best cars don't get sold; their prices are too high. Which means that the owners of these best cars don't put their cars on the market. And then this starts spiraling. The removal of the good cars from the market reduces the average price buyers are willing to pay, and then the very good cars no longer sell, and disappear from the market. And then the good cars, and so on until only the lemons are left.

http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2007/04/securitymatters_0419?currentPage=all


Well, its an album, not a car =/
but most people would rather buy a cheaper version of an album. Like from iTunes, or from the shop you know usually sells albums cheaper than other shops.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 25, 2007, 05:26:36 AM
Quote

Saw this on the in2christ list:

In 1970, American economist George Akerlof wrote a paper called "The Market for 'Lemons'" (abstract and article for pay here), which established asymmetrical information theory. He eventually won a Nobel Prize for his work, which looks at markets where the seller knows a lot more about the product than the buyer.

Akerlof illustrated his ideas with a used car market. A used car market includes both good cars and lousy ones (lemons). The seller knows which is which, but the buyer can't tell the difference -- at least until he's made his purchase. I'll spare you the math, but what ends up happening is that the buyer bases his purchase price on the value of a used car of average quality.

This means that the best cars don't get sold; their prices are too high. Which means that the owners of these best cars don't put their cars on the market. And then this starts spiraling. The removal of the good cars from the market reduces the average price buyers are willing to pay, and then the very good cars no longer sell, and disappear from the market. And then the good cars, and so on until only the lemons are left.

http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2007/04/securitymatters_0419?currentPage=all



However cds, unlike cars go for usually universal prices, the only excepts really being imported albums or albums that are no longer in print.

Re: Why popular things often suck
April 25, 2007, 09:55:15 PM
I think the point is that in this example, CDs are all of the same price, so what people desire is quality and yet they don't know how to find that, so end up buying shitty CDs, which then crowd better ones out of the market. It's a transformation of market forces.