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Metal Future

Re: Metal Future
October 18, 2004, 06:23:21 PM
I think that by blending the elements mentioned in my last post would be able to combine the best of two worlds: organic song composition with the newer electronic song composition.  They both should be used as partners just like CGI should be used as a partner to the film aesthetic, it should not become the aesthetic.  But perhaps I'm overly fantastic and idealistic in my dream and thoughts.

Re: Metal Future
October 18, 2004, 10:31:41 PM
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It may have already happened: the bands (like corpses) lay stagnant, but that does not mean the consciousness hasn't already materialized elsewhere.


The archetypes in the collective unconscious will again arise.  It'll be interesting to see their future incarnation.

Re: Metal Future
October 19, 2004, 01:37:25 PM
Oh, I forgot a couple

5 Dynamic variation

6 Rhythmically interesting

I don't really expect black metal to be resurrected as electronic music and I haven't been overly impressed by music in that vein so far but almost anything would be better than what we're getting.

Re: Metal Future
October 19, 2004, 05:34:28 PM
Electronica is more of a form of artistic progression/ regression (depending how you see it) and not really a form of Metal progression. Neither is it  a trend from what I can tell unless people are still intent on plagarising "the greats".  Combining the two in a convincing non-digital form would be a more interesting sound to these ears. If using digital technology, muddy the keyboard sound up a little for fucks sake!

Two albums that could be used as a basis for progression in Black  Metal:

Sort Vokter 'Folkloric Necro Metal'

Burzum 'Filososfem'

Why do individuals concentrate solely on the misanthropic/ depressive elements of Black Metal and never the beauty that elements of these two albums convey? It seems to pass us all by. Drudkh's 'Autumn Aurora' seems to me to be the only album I've heard which comes slightly close.


Re: Metal Future
October 19, 2004, 06:50:37 PM
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Electronica is more of a form of artistic progression/ regression (depending how you see it) and not really a form of Metal progression. Neither is it  a trend from what I can tell unless people are still intent on plagarising "the greats".  Combining the two in a convincing non-digital form would be a more interesting sound to these ears. If using digital technology, muddy the keyboard sound up a little for fucks sake!

Two albums that could be used as a basis for progression in Black  Metal:

Sort Vokter 'Folkloric Necro Metal'

Burzum 'Filososfem'

Why do individuals concentrate solely on the misanthropic/ depressive elements of Black Metal and never the beauty that elements of these two albums convey? It seems to pass us all by. Drudkh's 'Autumn Aurora' seems to me to be the only album I've heard which comes slightly close.



Darkspace?

Re: Metal Future
May 10, 2005, 02:15:06 PM
At this point I would like to see the musicians raising the structure complexity of their music somehow as classical music did, by overcoming the folklore, still using its ideas in composition. Metal orchestras? :) Sth. similiar.

I don't see this going anywhere else if ppl don't start considering evolving their music towards classical music's terms and this can only be done if they are philosophically/ideologicaly able to think that way. Education then art. That's about it. I don't know though, if putting a metal orchestra up, would set everyone in the hall deaf, or not. :)

Re: Metal Future
May 11, 2005, 02:48:27 AM
I think metal needs to look at its history (and the ancestral history of its adherants)for traces of conceptual elements that can be woven togethor into a whole to which future music can unify itself around. For example, whether you agree with its outlook or not, 'punk' as a concept rather than just one particular genre of 3 chord rock, is very diverse (i.e. punk, new wave, hardcore, crust, post-punk etc.) The unifying concept in this case seems to be one born out of the larger post-modern movement: a generally egalitarian individualist stance against society and its aesthetic judgements of what is 'good'. That attitude expressed itself in a myriad ways for better or worse. . Metal needs to adopt this same approach as it will find itself more musical freedom but still keeping a distinctivly 'metal' attitude that trenscends simple descriptions like 'brootal' or 'raw'. When metal starts progressing again,the innovations will not be novelty but meaningful ways to express content.
Speaking for myself, the stuff I write is somewhat ambient but also has this strangely intimate feeling as if it was played on a classical guitar.

Re: Metal Future
May 11, 2005, 02:51:11 AM
Anyone here write alot of black metal riffs in major keys?

Re: Metal Future
May 11, 2005, 04:08:26 AM
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Anyone here write alot of black metal riffs in major keys?


That's an interesting idea, one which I think Drudkh has done (and I'm sure other more obscure bands I've never heard). The thing about Major and Minor keys is that they've each been assigned absolutely positive or negative connotations by Christians who are incapable of viewing things in anything other than black in white. In reality, the emotional impact of major and minor keys have subjective qualities, and it is possible to make a "happy" melody in a minor key and vice versa. I've done it before. Furthermore, major and minor is basically just another name for two of the most common of the seven modes. I think that a major key can sound "dark" because of the often predictable hollowness of the sentimental melodies created with them. I think there's potential to create some very slyly ironic music using major keys.

When I'm writing metal, I like to imply a key, but do a lot of chromatic exploration outside of it. Most black metal doesn't conform exactly to keys, because this sounds predictable and not too dark, as far as the aesthetic needs of black metal go. Granted, these aesthetic needs could definitely be shattered in the interest of making music that isn't exclusively dark. Most black metal implies keys and plays lots outside of it, perhaps as a melodic response, or doesn't care at all. It should be noted that although I'm talking about this, I haven't made anything I think to be original or good enough to "release".


Re: Metal Future
May 12, 2005, 08:45:17 AM
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Two albums that could be used as a basis for progression in Black  Metal:

Sort Vokter 'Folkloric Necro Metal'

Burzum 'Filososfem'

Why do individuals concentrate solely on the misanthropic/ depressive elements of Black Metal and never the beauty that elements of these two albums convey?



I like how Abyssic Hate took the best elements off of "Filosofem" and came up with a consistently memorable cd ("Suicidal Emotions").
However, I just can't compare "Filosofem" with any of the Burzum releases before it. The monotony of the tracks, as well as the over the top distorted vocals, irritate the hell out of me. Although I love the third track, "Daughters of the Firmament", it is the exception.
I can't understand why Varg chose to distort his vocals, when he has arguably one of the top thre vocal styles in Extreme Metal history.

Re: Metal Future
May 12, 2005, 09:47:19 AM
Meh, the slight aesthetic deficiencies only serve to mask the genius held within. Abyssic Hate, on the other hand... black metal for slugs.

Re: Metal Future
May 12, 2005, 11:31:51 AM
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Abyssic Hate, on the other hand... black metal for slugs.












I object to your bigotry toward slugs. These noble creatures would have nothing to do with that shit!


Re: Metal Future
May 12, 2005, 12:31:41 PM
 :D Piss off, mchin. ;)

Re: Metal Future
May 12, 2005, 03:02:29 PM
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However, I just can't compare "Filosofem" with any of the Burzum releases before it. The monotony of the tracks, as well as the over the top distorted vocals, irritate the hell out of me. Although I love the third track, "Daughters of the Firmament", it is the exception.


You aren't listening closely enough. It's one of the most subtle albums I've ever heard. Especially in the song Dunkelheit, there are things going on that you won't catch until you hear it many times. I think it's one of the most interesting albums I've ever heard. The first two tracks actually sound like a freaking electronica album played with black metal aesthetics, instruments, and feeling. I remember seeing people bring up Kraftwerk all the time on this site, and reading that Euronymous of all people introduced the Norwegian black metal scene to Kraftwerk, and I got one of those "Ah-hah!" moments the next time I listened to Filosofem.