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Metal Future

Re: Metal Future
May 13, 2005, 07:12:41 PM
I actually think that Noise is the most extreme form of music. And not just because of it's aesthetics. Noise that is actually structured of course is not noise at all, and when understood is really amazing. I am thinking of stuff like Null, and a few of the Merzbow releases.

Re: Metal Future
May 24, 2005, 05:20:55 AM
I actually think that noise is... crap.

Electronic is suffering as much from the clone issues as metal. It's just that heaps of metal heads are discovering it as if it's healthy and not saturated.

Some have mentioned Summoning and others have mentioned metal orchestras. Summoning would be great orchestrated, though it'd be an expensive whim. Summoning are quality but they're not bothering to delve further into more complex approaches; they even admit this themselves.

I don't think the electronic approach (to those citing Beherit, Ildjarn, Burzum, Neptune Towers, Lord Wind) is actually a spark for the future. It's more like desperate death throes of a society. I enjoy all of those groups electronic releases, but they don't have burgeoning energy, they're resigned to the disintegration of metal and are desperately searching for other means of expression.

Re: Metal Future
May 24, 2005, 05:29:10 PM
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I actually think that noise is... crap.

Electronic is suffering as much from the clone issues as metal. It's just that heaps of metal heads are discovering it as if it's healthy and not saturated.

Some have mentioned Summoning and others have mentioned metal orchestras. Summoning would be great orchestrated, though it'd be an expensive whim. Summoning are quality but they're not bothering to delve further into more complex approaches; they even admit this themselves.

I don't think the electronic approach (to those citing Beherit, Ildjarn, Burzum, Neptune Towers, Lord Wind) is actually a spark for the future. It's more like desperate death throes of a society. I enjoy all of those groups electronic releases, but they don't have burgeoning energy, they're resigned to the disintegration of metal and are desperately searching for other means of expression.


Indeed, Electronic music is best listened to, like all music types generally, with the seminal works heralded and the rest cast on the rocks.  The repetitious nature of much of it tends to grate unless yr into it wholesale (I'm talking of dance floor orientated Electronica here mainly.) As for Metal heads embracing the genre? This often leads to an indulgence in bad drugs and a dulling of the senses which is obviously a bad thing. Metal heads at raves waving glow sticks? No thanks. That truly is for the moronic.

I think ideas have yet to be utilised fully as regards old analogue keyboards. The Juno 6 is a fantastically vulgar (as in necro!!!) sounding keyboard that could work wonders if applied correctly. And I do mean correctly.  

Why do I get the idea that Death Metal utilising electronics would be a bad idea?

Re: Metal Future
May 24, 2005, 05:48:46 PM
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I like how Abyssic Hate took the best elements off of "Filosofem" and came up with a consistently memorable cd ("Suicidal Emotions").
However, I just can't compare "Filosofem" with any of the Burzum releases before it. The monotony of the tracks, as well as the over the top distorted vocals, irritate the hell out of me. Although I love the third track, "Daughters of the Firmament", it is the exception.
I can't understand why Varg chose to distort his vocals, when he has arguably one of the top thre vocal styles in Extreme Metal history.


The distorted vocals are one of the truly defining elements of Filosofem. My favourite Burzum release and a fucking milestone by far. Admittedly, the electronic pieces could do with being a little better, but the way the album works with it's track placement is just fantastic. This to me, along with Sort Vokter and Manes, examplifies the freedom and contempt for boundaries found within early Black Metal.

I recall someone on anus describing Abyssic Hate as being a Cure cover act with a veneer of Black Metal.  Not similair at all to Filosofem as it is just bloody awful.

Re: Metal Future
May 24, 2005, 06:48:22 PM
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Why do I get the idea that Death Metal utilising electronics would be a bad idea?


Keyboards in death metal have worked in some cases, videlicet, middle-era Pestilence, or on the opener of Entombed's debut. What Amorphis attempted with "Tales From The Thousand Lakes" wopuldn't have been a bad idea either had they not relinquiished their embrace of death metal so wholly. In general it fits well with doomy, melodic death metal so long as bands eschews the all-too-common cheese that seems to spoil most of such efforts.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 04:15:38 AM
Infester use keyboards in Death Metal like they should be used: very sparingly and in just the right place.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 04:16:49 AM
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I recall someone on anus describing Abyssic Hate as being a Cure cover act with a veneer of Black Metal.  Not similair at all to Filosofem as it is just bloody awful.


It's only a qualitative difference.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 02:26:30 PM
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It's only a qualitative difference.



Not  really. Explain how the power of 'Jesus' Tod' can be likened to anything from the ridiculously dire Abyssic Hate. Contrived nonsense for the weak.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 02:39:57 PM
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Keyboards in death metal have worked in some cases, videlicet, middle-era Pestilence, or on the opener of Entombed's debut. What Amorphis attempted with "Tales From The Thousand Lakes" wopuldn't have been a bad idea either had they not relinquiished their embrace of death metal so wholly. In general it fits well with doomy, melodic death metal so long as bands eschews the all-too-common cheese that seems to spoil most of such efforts.


The band Nocturnus also utilized keyboards into their structure of death metal.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 09:33:43 PM
Nocturnus is good listening, but some of the goofy "General MIDI sci-fi sounds patch" I could do without. To the best of my recollection it never did much besides 1) providing an intro with goofy sci-fi noises 2) doubling a guitar line once in a while.

Gorgut's Obscura is a direction nobody has ever bothered expanding upon, to the best of my knowledge. Most "technical" death metal seems to be content doling out a million bland riffs per minute, throwing in some spastic "jazz-influenced" gestures and leaving it at that.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 09:58:31 PM
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Gorgut's Obscura is a direction nobody has ever bothered expanding upon, to the best of my knowledge. Most "technical" death metal seems to be content doling out a million bland riffs per minute, throwing in some spastic "jazz-influenced" gestures and leaving it at that.


Yes!

That album sounds as much like death metal as a typical death metal band sounds like a speed metal band. There are elements that are shared, but a whole lot of differences. I think using very long phrases of freakish guitar playing with weird chords, dissonance, harmonics, etc.  like they do has a lot of potential. I've tried playing some of their stuff on my guitar, but it's a little hard to figure out what the hell they're doing 90% of the time.

Has anyone noticed a phenomenon where older fans of metal absolutely hate it, because it seems totally dissonant and intolerable (and these are metalheads speaking), but younger metalheads are blown away by it when you play it for them? This has been my experience.

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 10:18:06 PM
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Has anyone noticed a phenomenon where older fans of metal absolutely hate it, because it seems totally dissonant and intolerable (and these are metalheads speaking), but younger metalheads are blown away by it when you play it for them? This has been my experience.


I'd say that's just part of the general trend of older people becoming obstinately set in their ways, and newbies being receptive to most anything thrown their way.  ;D

Re: Metal Future
May 25, 2005, 11:25:52 PM
Nobody's really tried to expand on paths set by Demilich or With Fear-era ATG either.

Re: Metal Future
May 27, 2005, 04:37:38 AM
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Not  really. Explain how the power of 'Jesus' Tod' can be likened to anything from the ridiculously dire Abyssic Hate. Contrived nonsense for the weak.


sorry but what you replied with is still a qualitative difference.

bah, forget it.

Re: Metal Future
May 28, 2005, 07:34:09 PM
I see no future for metal. For metal is old school metal - 80's and up to early 90's. Old School Metal died with the end of the 2nd wave of Black Metal.
If you don't belive that, let us analyze it genre by genre.

Heavy Metal. The genre in its original form is dead, but the bastard children of it are what is mistaken for it - Euro Power Metal, Symphonic metal, melodic Metal etc. The genre in one form or another is still strugling for life.
Thrash Metal.It is 99% dead. The remaining 1% is represented by so called Retro Thrash : a bunch of bands that started in late 90's or 00's and that try to play thrash as it was in the 80's early 90's. The genre is beyond rescue.
Black Metal. Completely dead. People are just jumping around the corpse of the genre, hoping to bring it to life: they experiment with electronics, technical proficiency, elements of other genres, philosophy, ideology ... but nothing helps, the corpse remains a corpse. The peak of Black Metal was Darkthrone's Under A Funeral Moon. Then came out Transilvanian Hunger which made BM more accesable and spawned hundreds of clones which eqaulled to a backstab.
Death Metal. This genre is also completely dead. the whole idea, concept behind the genre is lost, thus making impossible its further existance.

May you have any questions, go ahead.