Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Metal Future

Re: Metal Future
May 29, 2005, 11:44:49 AM
Quote

sorry but what you replied with is still a qualitative difference.

bah, forget it.


He he. I dig what yr saying and agree to a similarity of themes (to an extent) giving rise to the qualitative difference; I just can't place them in the same mold in my mind though. Filosofem sings of optimism and inner strength to me (perhaps mistakenly, he he...) while Abyssic Hate of charity and a "pity me " ego/ child mentality. I don't see Varg's music as doing that.  It's more of  a canvas on which he paints a mood whereas Abyssic Hate just seems utterly contrived, comunicating a totally dissimilair emotion. Kind of another qualitative difference. Balls to this. You win. He he...

Re: Metal Future
May 29, 2005, 07:11:10 PM
"Gorgut's Obscura is a direction nobody has ever bothered expanding upon, to the best of my knowledge."

It hasn't been expanded upon because 99% of bands don't know how to structure music. Many bands play a zillion riffs on all kinds of time signatures, but the end result is a mess of confusion.

Anyone who wants to learn how to structure complicated music should go to guitar.com and check out the Gorguts videos.

Lord_Feanor

Re: Metal Future
September 14, 2007, 02:16:25 PM
I think that only time will tell.

Re: Metal Future
September 18, 2007, 01:57:34 AM
Quote

He he. I dig what yr saying and agree to a similarity of themes (to an extent) giving rise to the qualitative difference; I just can't place them in the same mold in my mind though. Filosofem sings of optimism and inner strength to me (perhaps mistakenly, he he...) while Abyssic Hate of charity and a "pity me " ego/ child mentality. I don't see Varg's music as doing that.  It's more of  a canvas on which he paints a mood whereas Abyssic Hate just seems utterly contrived, comunicating a totally dissimilair emotion. Kind of another qualitative difference. Balls to this. You win. He he...

Filosofem celebrates darkness, melancholy, decrepitude and seems to have lesser amont of despair than HLTO but you can't quite call it optimistic.
Da stopper rittet
Som varte i en livstid
For herren går (inn i slottet fra drømmen)

Re: Metal Future
September 18, 2007, 04:43:50 PM
Quote
"Gorgut's Obscura is a direction nobody has ever bothered expanding upon, to the best of my knowledge."

It hasn't been expanded upon because 99% of bands don't know how to structure music. Many bands play a zillion riffs on all kinds of time signatures, but the end result is a mess of confusion.

Anyone who wants to learn how to structure complicated music should go to guitar.com and check out the Gorguts videos.


How about Morbid Angel's "Formulas"?
Because I am more intelligent than you are.

Re: Metal Future
September 19, 2007, 09:21:07 PM
Another good thread destroyed by the stupidity of those who replied. HOw much longer must this go on?

Re: Metal Future
September 20, 2007, 12:35:28 AM
Quote

How about Morbid Angel's "Formulas"?


Well like I said, what, two years ago?....99% of bands don't know what their doing. Morbid Angel, along with Gorguts, and a few others, can make sense of their ideas into a logical format.

Re: Metal Future
September 21, 2007, 11:09:41 AM
Quote
Fans: What would you like to see in the future of metal? What developments do you see now, that you feel will last for more than a few months? Do you ever see the medium changing?

For those who are more than fans, what would you like to do for metal, or underground music of its caliber? Note that playing in a band is not the only option available - many have useful talents.


Thinking on this now:

As a fan, I would like to see music that distinguishes itself again. The metal now is metal for metal's sake, which means that musical quality is secondary (think of how many idiots neo-Nazis admit to their organizations because said idiots are "white").

As a writer and DJ, I would like to see more music that eschews stylistic concerns and focuses on writing good music. Music is not style. Style is not progress. All of that trendy shit is lies for morons. What matters is the poetic nature of the music, does it express something intangible in the tangible, does it expand the listening experience instead of confirming known quantities, etc.


Re: Metal Future
September 21, 2007, 05:21:48 PM
I guess the metal is just like the older metal bands.  The genre has too much of an identity I suppose, and the bands just focus on absorbing that identity and then make no more moves forward.  

I honestly don't thinking making new Black Metal or new Death Metal is the answer.  I'm also thinking that if anything really amazing happens, that it could be going on for a long time before any of us even realizes it.

Re: Metal Future
September 22, 2007, 11:21:06 AM
When you think about it however black metal and death metal are just like Black Sabbath, except it has kept developing along the line of thought that it started. They wanted to sound like horror movie soundtracks... that got expanded to a question of what is horror, and the answer is apparently a Nietzschean naturalism. So from here we have to find a way to make horror even more appealing, to raise the next generation of people who murder idiots and praise battle, who aren't afraid of the rules of the Church even if they don't say "Made in Jerusalem|The Vatican" upon them...

K

Re: Metal Future
September 22, 2007, 06:34:12 PM
I think its time to innovate a new genre. Black metal has been around for 20+ years, and death metal isn't much younger. I have no idea what dynamic a new metal genre would have, or what it would be called (lychee metal?) but I think that both these genres have moved out of the innovative phase and into a matter of fact phase. They are too well defined to be further expanded on. Almost all the good black metal and death metal came from a time when the musicians were still trying to figure out what makes death metal death metal, and what makes black metal black metal.

Re: Metal Future
September 22, 2007, 08:58:32 PM
Why don't we try and compare the state of metal to the state of orchestral music through the ages?

How did composers of old find inspiration after hundreds of years of works already created?

One way they managed to innovate, and not just for technical showmanship, was the addition of new instruments to their orchestras as they became available. Should we be seeking new sounds in metal?

Or should we be adding the metal guitar into an orchestra?

K

Re: Metal Future
September 22, 2007, 09:09:20 PM
because it ends up like yngwie malmsteen? I understand what you mean though. all midi blackmetal perhaps?

Re: Metal Future
September 22, 2007, 09:16:20 PM
Quote
because it ends up like yngwie malmsteen? I understand what you mean though. all midi blackmetal perhaps?


Never listened to Malmsteen.

The closest thing an orchestra has to a guitar sound are the bigger brass horns. Sometimes I wonder what a thick metal guitar would sound like playing these parts.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Metal Future
September 22, 2007, 09:28:47 PM
Quote

Never listened to Malmsteen.

The closest thing an orchestra has to a guitar sound are the bigger brass horns. Sometimes I wonder what a thick metal guitar would sound like playing these parts.


As a trombonist and tubist I'll have to agree with you. Metal riffs translate fairly well to brass instruments—"Master of Puppets" was one of the first things I learned in middle school—so it probably works the other way around, too.

This reminds me... I really need to improve my electric guitar technique.