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Art

Vajra

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 07:52:10 AM
John Martin



Sadak in Search of the Waters of Oblivion, 1812



The Bard, 1819



Pandemonium, 1841



The Great Day of His Wrath, 1853

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 07:58:47 AM
I wonder what kind of reaction this will get here of all places, but this: http://www.geocities.com/cartedatrionfi/Images/SistineChapel.jpg

And before you start with the Christian bashing, take a minute or two to think about what Michelanglo is trying to communicate besides just painting scenes from Genesis.

I also greatly enjoy the work of Rembrandt, such as his "The Mill": http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/rembrandt/1650/mill.jpg and the work of Surrealists such as Dali (I'm sure you have all seen some of his work) and Giorgio de Chirico, "Melancholy and Mystery of a Street" being a favourite: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/18/Melancholy%26MysteryofaStreet.jpg

Amd painting I enjoy purely thanks to it's aesthetic is "Blue Nude" by Pierre Bonnard: http://www.usc.edu/schools/annenberg/asc/projects/comm544/library/images/664bg.jpg

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 08:46:14 AM
douard Detaille - Le Rve ("The Dream")



Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 12:43:56 PM


Martin Johnson Heade

This one strucked me when I visited the National gallery in Washington. The big beautiful pink orchid on an ugly background.

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/H/heade.html#images



Thomas Cole...
Any Candlemass fans?

http://en.w i k i p e d i a.org/wiki/Thomas_Cole

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 01:23:16 PM
Good to see Durer's The Knight, Death and the Devil in here, really like that one.

I've always enjoyed Hans Holbein the Younger's work. Not just the Dance of Death series but the court paintings he did (The Ambassadors; even the Tudor portraits are decent for what they are).

Like Kittelsen, John Bauer (Sweden) also captures rural folklore excellently.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 06:38:40 PM
Quote
I wonder what kind of reaction this will get here of all places, but this: http://www.geocities.com/cartedatrionfi/Images/SistineChapel.jpg

And before you start with the Christian bashing, take a minute or two to think about what Michelanglo is trying to communicate besides just painting scenes from Genesis.


It would be silly to ignore the works of Michelangelo due to to affiliation with Christianity, seeing as many composers praised here were deeply religious. When I stop appreciating the beauty of of the Sistine Chapel, I'll have to stop appreciating the Quartet for the End of Time, et cetera.

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 07:53:49 PM
I do enjoy visiting churches. The religion was somehow more authentic in the times of Cathedral St. Stephens in Vienna or Notre-Dame in Paris. Anyway, I think those constructions are beautiful.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 08:27:15 PM
I, too, enjoy visiting old churches. There's some beautiful architecture and artwork put into great chapels. I'd like to someday visit some of the great religious buildings in Europe; and take pictures, of course.

Re: Art
October 21, 2007, 01:03:05 AM
Yes, I do believe some of the great cathedrals of the past are among the greatest architectural marvels of man's past...inside and outside. But not any more. In fact, I hate a lot of this "modern architecture." Wish there was a lot more of this instead:



Re: Art
October 21, 2007, 06:45:19 AM
Quote

It would be silly to ignore the works of Michelangelo due to to affiliation with Christianity, seeing as many composers praised here were deeply religious. When I stop appreciating the beauty of of the Sistine Chapel, I'll have to stop appreciating the Quartet for the End of Time, et cetera.

Very true. I thought it might be rejected on the basis of its overt Christianity though.

Old Catholic churches are very beautiful, especially the relationship between Gothic architecture's forms (couldn't think of a better word) and it's icongraphy, to me is, well, divine. The stained glass artwork is so impressive as well. I do enjoy Classical architectural forms more though, the Parthenon of course being the best example.

On a related note, would anyone be able to help me in fixing the fact that no images on this forum are appearing for me? (No embeded images, no emoticons, nothing, I just see words in emoticons place and a blank space where all these works of art are meant to be)

Re: Art
October 21, 2007, 09:30:40 AM
Quote
On a related note, would anyone be able to help me in fixing the fact that no images on this forum are appearing for me? (No embeded images, no emoticons, nothing, I just see words in emoticons place and a blank space where all these works of art are meant to be)


Either your browser has disabled images ("show"==>"images"==>"display images" or something similar), either you're living in 1987 ! Or you're simply using a MacIntosh ;)

Re: Art
October 22, 2007, 09:07:37 AM
favourite of mine.


Re: Art
October 22, 2007, 08:56:02 PM
Here is some visual art I've found on the internet that I am quite fond of.  Some of these are too big or just can't be directly linked so they are just url links.

Cristofano Allori

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/45/Allori_Cristofano_Judith.jpg

Jonathan Ryder

http://squarepixel.cgsociety.org/gallery/400875/

Fahrija Velic

http://fahrija.cgsociety.org/gallery/355460/

Donato Diancola



http://www.donatoart.com/gallery.html

Adolf Wlfli



http://www.adolfwoelfli.ch/index.php?c=e&level=17&sublevel=0

Christian Lorenz Shceurer



http://www.christianlorenzscheurer.com/htmlpages/htmlmenue/homepage.html

Clark Ashton Smith





http://www.eldritchdark.com/

Alex Tuis



http://a.tuis.free.fr/index1.html

Bruce Pennington

http://www.eldritchdark.com/files/galleries/books-of-cas/pennington_shadow.jpg

Linda Bergkvist

http://www.furiae.com/gallery/eyreequel.jpg

Yeah, there's some more that I saved to my computer but cannot seem to find the links for...

Re: Art
October 23, 2007, 07:50:58 AM
Quote
The best paintings I have ever seen have always dealt with christinsanity; It's a shame that they weren't done about more meaningful topics, but perhaps it was their devote "faith" that gave them such feeling to complete such great works.


Plenty of works, in nearly all eras, deal with classic mythology and also national folklore that's quasi religious. Most of the times European painters / sculptors create both mythological and christian works of art through their career, and go through periods of either the former or the latter depending on their mood, the requests they have, and their personal interest. Only in extremely devout periods one could not create what he wanted, but even then, some did anyway (Botticelli for example, although Savonarole made the works burn...). It's not as if pre-christian or non-christian topics were absent of great art, quite the contrary. And christian works of art are imagined and created through the European lens of spirituality and artistic expression. In case some people seriously think this, we should never consider those as "foreign". It's not even a different language, it's just the nouns that have been replaced. Really.

Re: Art
October 23, 2007, 09:28:16 AM
Michael Whelan


'Lovecraft1' (this was used on the covers of H.P Lovecraft reissues, as well as 'Lovecraft2' which you may know better as the cover art of Obituary's 'Cause of Death').


'Erosion'


'Fortitude'

Have a browse through his gallery:
http://www.michaelwhelan.com/index.asp?vsPage=gallerycollection