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Art

Art
October 14, 2007, 11:42:47 PM
Here's a topic for you to show your favourite painters and most bizarre/beautiful discoveries.

I'll start by mentioning Otto Dix, I really like his grotesque style.



more here:
http://www.tendreams.org/dix.htm
Because I am more intelligent than you are.

Re: Art
October 15, 2007, 03:06:10 AM
i think there was a similar topic before.

Theodore Kittelsen - the artist behind the cover art of Hvis Lyset Tar Oss
but my favourite Kittelsen painting is this....stunning  


http://www.norsegate.com/kittelsen.html
Da stopper rittet
Som varte i en livstid
For herren går (inn i slottet fra drømmen)

Vajra

Re: Art
October 15, 2007, 04:25:38 AM

Re: Art
October 16, 2007, 11:34:51 AM
They got it behind the soundboard at le Club Saphic in Montreal
Because I am more intelligent than you are.

Re: Art
October 16, 2007, 02:54:26 PM
Zdzislaw Beksinski, one of my favorites. I greatly enjoy his morbid but beautiful and tranquil style.





Here's a decent gallery that's a little less annoying to navigate than the official site: http://gnosis.art.pl/iluminatornia/sztuka_o_inspiracji/zdzislaw_beksinski/zdzislaw_beksinski.htm


chrstphrbnntt

Re: Art
October 16, 2007, 05:04:59 PM
This site may interest you: http://www.artrenewal.com/

Raise_the_Dead

Re: Art
October 16, 2007, 09:36:13 PM
More Goya:




Gustav Dore (from Paradise Lost, anyone recognize the style?):



Raphael (this is Satan's Fall):



Albrecht Durer:



Escher:


Re: Art
October 18, 2007, 12:55:19 AM
I loved every piece Gustave Doré did for The Divine Comedy..it's what initially drew me to the book. I always thought his works would be very good for the basis of a tattoo.

Re: Art
October 19, 2007, 02:17:18 AM
Yes I'd have to agree with o.d.i.r. love Zdzislaw Beksinski's work.

I try to check out artists around now, but still prefer traditional styles. One of my faves discoveries on the web has got to be Kolaboy (on DA), acrylic paintings with quite surreal subjects, but with a kind of dated look about them.
This is one of my favorites by him (sorry its a little large):

Grr...

Re: Art
October 19, 2007, 01:13:55 PM
Recently, for my Painting course, we went to the school's library which featured the works of Florence Putterman. We watched a video about her first, that they were showing at the display, and then looked at her various works. During the video it became clear that she was completely clueless and that she had no idea what she was painting. The display featured all works by her pertaining to Native Americans. Almost all of the paintings had symbols the Natives used as language. She admitted in the film that she did not know what any of the symbols stood for and that she has no knowledge of Native American history. She then gave some bullshit story about having visions and feelings of familiarity of ancient Native landmarks.

The style was abstract. Abstract art is something I cannot stomach. I'm sure there are some abstract artists out there who put actual meaning behind their paintings but then there are those like Florence Putterman who just splatter color on a canvas and let other people make assumptions about the work and that she is some sort of artistic genius.

http://www.putterman.com/Profile.htm


Re: Art
October 19, 2007, 01:50:14 PM
Some abstract painters have no idea what they are doing it's true, but personally, when the result is somehow amusing, I like it.

Florence Putterman is ok, I've look at her gallery in you link. "Return to Four Corners " reminds me of Chagall the others are original but do not appeal to me.
Because I am more intelligent than you are.

Re: Art
October 19, 2007, 02:20:58 PM
Quote
Some abstract painters have no idea what they are doing it's true, but personally, when the result is somehow amusing, I like it.

Florence Putterman is ok, I've look at her gallery in you link. "Return to Four Corners " reminds me of Chagall the others are original but do not appeal to me.



the link i posted before does not actually contain the paintings in the exhibit i was at, but i now found one that was:
http://www.putterman.com/images/082.jpg it's hard to tell from the picture, but this painting is VERY textured..she glued sand on it even..it's one i chose to write about for the assignment, but i still do not think it's anything special..it's just the one that i saw "best" out of the display. i agree that her work is original but not appealing to me, the other students or any of the art professors. this however is art so it's all in the eye of the interpreter especially since it's abstract


Re: Art
October 19, 2007, 04:25:08 PM
Blake and Dore are two of my favorites.

Dore's "Pandemonium" illustration from the Paradise Lost series has actually been used as album art for a number of metal bands, most notably, Emperor's "Anthems..."

Blake's "The Blasphemer" and "Whirlwind of Lovers" from his illustrations of Dante's Inferno:






Re: Art
October 19, 2007, 06:31:24 PM
Quote


the link i posted before does not actually contain the paintings in the exhibit i was at, but i now found one that was:
http://www.putterman.com/images/082.jpg it's hard to tell from the picture, but this painting is VERY textured..she glued sand on it even..it's one i chose to write about for the assignment, but i still do not think it's anything special..it's just the one that i saw "best" out of the display. i agree that her work is original but not appealing to me, the other students or any of the art professors. this however is art so it's all in the eye of the interpreter especially since it's abstract


"In their ebullience and unaffected optimism, the paintings of Florence Putterman recall the free wheeling inventiveness of the early Modernists.  Having broken all the rules of painting, those pioneers of abstraction fashioned a new artistic language with which to express the remarkable changes sweeping in with the dawn of the twentieth century."

I love the "breaking the rules" bit. Following in this inspirational path I shall record myself putting a drillbit through a drumset and cymbals. Modernity hoorah!

Maze of Tolerance,
My girlfriend sent me a book of those Paradise Lost sketchings, all of them very beautiful. I do believe a few were used for Emperor's Anthems at the Welkien Dusk album artwork. I think it is also similar to Blessed are the Sick (sorry I can't remember names here!). Is it being used elsewhere?

Re: Art
October 20, 2007, 02:44:48 AM
Ah, 18th-19th century German nationalist art. It's...inspiring:

Caspar David Friedrich



Quote
Born Sept. 5, 1774, Greifswald, Pomerania [Germany] died May 7, 1840, Dresden, Saxony                                                                              Pioneer early 19th-century German Romantic painter. Friedrich's vast, mysterious landscapes and seascape paintings proclaimed man’s helplessness against the forces of nature and did much to establish the idea of the sublime as central concerns of the Romantic movement.
Friedrich studied from 1794 to 1798 at the academy at Copenhagen but was largely self-taught. Settling at Dresden, Friedrich became a member of an artistic and literary circle that included the painter Philipp Otto Runge and the writers Ludwig Tieck and Novalis. Friedrich's drawings in sepia, executed in his neat early style, won the poet J.W. von Goethe’s approval and a prize from the Weimar Art Society in 1805. Friedrich's first important oil painting, “The Cross in the Mountains” (c. 1807), established his mature style, characterized by an overwhelming sense of isolation, and was an attempt to replace the traditional symbology of religious painting with one drawn from nature. Other symbolic landscape paintings, such as “Shipwreck in the Ice” (1822), reveal his fatalism and obsession with death. Though based on close observation of nature, Friedrich paintings were coloured by his imaginative response to the atmosphere of the Baltic coast and the Harz Mountains, which he found both awesome and ominous. Friedrich paintings portray the untamed power of nature; this is in sharp contrast to Enlightenment-era painters such as Thomas Gainsborough, who used nature to bring out qualities in their human subjects. Friedrich paintings are often read as expressing German nationalism and patriotism during a time of the Napoleonic Wars. In 1824 Friedrich was made professor of the Dresden academy. For a long time Friedrich paintings were forgotten; but these paintings were revived when the 20th century recognized its own existential isolation in his paintings.


I don't know.  He sounds fairly metal to me.

Winter Landscape With Church



Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog



Graveyard Under Snow


AllArtClassic.com