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Folk "metal" without the rock

Folk "metal" without the rock
November 19, 2007, 08:28:07 AM
I've been wondering whether anyone here could recommend some folk bands/releases which keep in line with the "adventurous" outlook of metal while keeping the usual rock stylings out. Obviously, I don't mean Finntroll, Windir or anything else from the viking metal heap - more like Lisa Gerrard interpreting Sveinbjörn Beinteinsson.
To shed some more light on the matter: the only songs from Storm's "Nordavind" album that outlasted the initial hype were the minimalist vocal tracks; Isengard's "Hostmorke" managed to age in a more handsome fashion, but still, "Landet og Havet" stands out as the shortest, yet most evocative song on that release.
The ambience of Jan Garbarek & Agnes Buen Garnas comes to mind, but aside from that... I'm in the dark here. Any ideas?

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 19, 2007, 12:23:23 PM
The group you named is propably the only thing that exist. Here in Quebec we have Brume d'Automne, but it's generally more Black then Folk metal. Still very metal.

As far as I know, Tyr is not bad. It draw influence from rock, alot, but not in the same type that Finntroll. More prog rock, for structure and time signature mostly. The rest is Metal/Folk.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 19, 2007, 02:43:25 PM
Skyforger's Latviesu Strelnieki is quite good.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 19, 2007, 06:53:21 PM
HAGALAZ RUNEDANCE

SONNE HAGAL

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 20, 2007, 12:36:12 AM
Enslaved - Vikinglgr Veldi

The newer Graveland stuff is also close.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 20, 2007, 03:26:39 AM
Cruachan is a pretty decent folk metal band from Ireland. Their first album, Tuatha Na Gael, is more black than folk but their later work features black metal screeching alongside with clean female vocals.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 20, 2007, 12:16:20 PM
Yes, most Folk/Viking Metal has rock 'n roll/Heavy/Power Metal stylings with a few of the more accessible aesthetics from BM being the central mold. It makes for nice listening on occasion, but it's devoid of the artistic heights bands lauded here typically have.

The first and final demo ("Horizons" and "Vandreren") comprising Isengard's Vinterskugge are eons better than their proper full-length, Høstmørke.

I haven't heard much from them, but it seems Falkenbach could be what you seek.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 21, 2007, 02:32:25 AM
Quote
Yes, most Folk/Viking Metal has rock 'n roll/Heavy/Power Metal stylings with a few of the more accessible aesthetics from BM being the central mold. It makes for nice listening on occasion, but it's devoid of the artistic heights bands lauded here typically have.

I haven't heard much from them, but it seems Falkenbach could be what you seek.


Youre right on the first count. Personally, it is a very enjoyable listen, but its like eating ice cream. I dont eat it for nutrition, i eat it because it tastes good, and it doesnt really do much for my body. Apply the same idea with bands like Finntroll and Ensiferum.

and Falkenbach is quite good from what ive heard.

sd

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 21, 2007, 06:44:39 AM
I quite like Arkona from Russia.
Excellent female vokillist.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 21, 2007, 05:36:36 PM
Quote

The newer Graveland stuff is also close.


In what sense?  Newer Graveland more closely approximates a sort of standard, pseudo-classical tonal rock-based rhytmic approach that is fairly common in the genre.  There's a hell of a lot more 'folk' in the melodies of Carpathian Wolves, The Celtic Winter and (especially) Thousand Swords than any of the more recent material - more quality and a fuckton less rock too.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 21, 2007, 09:21:25 PM
Occulta Mors' Black/Viking side project, Nachtfalke is worthy of mention here.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 22, 2007, 05:19:31 AM
Thanks for your input.

So far, Skyforger (which I've already known) roughly meets the specifications, though I find it hilarious how they managed to record an album which is both powerful and audibly amateurish after having produced 2-3 releases consisting mostly of, erm, middle-of-the-road power/folk metal with BM aesthetics.
As for Falkenbach: the ice cream analogy applies here. It's pleasant drinking music, but essentially devoid of much substance. Pick this if you don't want to do some polka dancing to Finntroll.

It seems that the following could be an interesting avenue for all black/folk/viking metal bands that don't want to suck: dig deeper into world music, destandardize instrumentation, lose the compulsion to keep a metal aesthetic, and just keep an "only death is real" plaque in the studio. An invigorating alternative to "3-chord acoustic guitar around campfire" neofolk and Hedningarna clones.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 22, 2007, 11:39:12 AM
Quote
Newer Graveland more closely approximates a sort of standard, pseudo-classical tonal rock-based rhytmic approach that is fairly common in the genre.


Newer Graveland applies a sense of theme and motif that the older work found it difficult to assimilate. It preserves the folkisch spirit in its narrative, even if the music has gotten more conventional, in part through learning of instruments.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 22, 2007, 03:56:17 PM
Quote

Newer Graveland applies a sense of theme and motif that the older work found it difficult to assimilate. It preserves the folkisch spirit in its narrative, even if the music has gotten more conventional, in part through learning of instruments.


Meh, it provides a sense of verse and chorus, rather than the linear and associative narrative arrangements of the earlier material, easier to assimilate yes, and certainly easier to pick out dominant melodies from the deliberate diversions, but really, weaker in every sense.  Even the technical quality of instrumentation isn't vastly improved (except in that Retarded Cousin Capricornus has been replaced by a machine that, at the very least, actually keeps time).  The quality of composition however, has declined from the elite tier to merely very good.

The biggest problem is that, where Thousand Swords and The Celtic Winter were supremely inspired albums preeminent within their chosen realm, the post-Memory and Destiny material, while strong, duplicates much of what Summoning aims for, but without the epic scale or the more developed musical sensibility: it's black metal as high quality muzak.

Re: Folk "metal" without the rock
November 23, 2007, 12:17:13 AM
what's wrong with capricornus' drumming? i thought it was unique and put an interesting spin on the early graveland material..