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Tips for a classical newbie

Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 02:16:59 PM
In the past few months, i have been delving into classical music. i have found that it shares many characteristics with metal, and its wonderful music to relax to.

i would just like to get some input from members here on their favorite symphonies/composers and what works i should get. as of now i only have works from Mozart, Beethoven, and Bach (hey cut me some slack im a beginner  :P).

so, any suggestions?
No.

Having reviewed the thread, baby Jesus is most definitely weeping at this point.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 03:27:59 PM
I'm in the process of discovering classical music myself. As you, I have mostly concerntrated on the works of Bach, Beethoven and Mozart, but here are some other pieces that have made a great impression:

Edvard Grieg - Peer Gynt Suites, Piano Concerto in A Minor

Gustav Holst - The Planets (Sounds very "metal", especially Mars, the Bringer of War)

Franz Schubert - Winterreise, 5th Symphony, "Death and the maiden", "Rosamunde"

Antonio Vivaldi - The Four Seasons

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 03:34:34 PM
You need to be specific about what you want, saying I want more classical music doesn't help much.

But since Fryden has already stated some mandatory pieces I might as well continue.

Bach - St John Passion, St Matthew Passion, The art of fugue

Beethoven - All his odd numbered symphonies, All of his piano sonatas

Handel - The messiah

Sibelius - Rondo of the waves, Finlandia, His violin concertos  

Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6

Baber - Adagio for strings, 1st two symphonies

Rachmaninov - A Window In Time (Cd made during his life of him performing his own piano pieces), All of his piano sonatas and his piano concerto's

Mozart - The Requiem mass

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 04:32:59 PM
I suggest you to always analyse the work that you discover, it can give you better appreciation. Always check out the orchestra and the director.

For begginer, all is said, but some other personnal favorite :

Franz Schubert - 8th Symhony (unfinished), Trout Quintet
Anton Bruckner - 4th Symphony
Paganini - 24 caprice
Wagner - Tristan and Iseult
Schuman - 4 symphony
Tchaikovsky - Manfred Symphony
Strawinsky - Le Sacre du Printemps
Listz - Bach transcription and Piano concerto (favorite being the first 2)

If you want more modern compositor, I suggest you Ligeti.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 05:15:50 PM
Quote
You need to be specific about what you want, saying I want more classical music doesn't help much.


well i did ask you gents which works you enjoyed a lot, and from there i had hoped to get opinions of what i should seek out.

to be more specific, i suppose, i have found that i enjoy the happier stylings as well as the more direct, and seemingly "heavier" stylings. so i guess what i am saying is that i have not yet heard a composer which i have not liked.
No.

Having reviewed the thread, baby Jesus is most definitely weeping at this point.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 06:54:14 PM
there are some astounding works to be found in the french impressionists music. composers like Ravel, Debussy and Satie composed pieces with a rather serene daydream inducing affect. it is truely music to get lost in..

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 07:13:26 PM
Quote
If you want more modern compositor, I suggest you Ligeti.


+ Messian, Feldman, Nono, Reich, Gubaidulina, Partch... just throwing a few names out there to investigate.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 08:00:09 PM
Yeah sure those are great. But as far as I go, I always heard a more classical sound in Ligeti work, for structure and all, then the ambient influence of people like Reich. To me, it's a great ''transition'' for begginers.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 29, 2007, 11:14:22 PM
Sergei Prokofiev

I often introduce metal fans to classical music with Prokofiev's powerful compositions. The way he blends his restless Russian chorals into heroical melodies is breathtaking. I remember I uploaded some not so long ago...

Surprisingly no one mentioned Carl Orff, perhaps his Carmina Burana is too well known but still... Haven't seen Gustav Mahler either, his fifth has pretty much everything you can expect out of a symphony.

Yet, my favorite pieces (from the moment I heard them) are both featured in my last upload. Great pianist as well.

Tchaikovsky - Piano Concerto #1/Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto #2
Because I am more intelligent than you are.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 30, 2007, 12:43:50 AM
I would recommend Mahler. He wrote massive symphonies (in terms of both length and orchestra size) that are some of the greatest and most emotional in the repertoire. Fortunately, someone uploaded all of his symphonies on here a while back. My personal favorite is the 5th, but you might want to start with the 4th, which is his most "normal" symphony.

Also, I would suggest getting a cheap box set with excerpts from many different pieces. Even if the performances are not the best, you can still find out what you might like. The first pieces I liked back when I only listened to metal were Grieg's piano concerto, Paganini's first violin concerto, and Debussy's La Mer.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 30, 2007, 12:50:22 AM
Quote
Sergei Prokofiev

I often introduce metal fans to classical music with Prokofiev's powerful compositions. The way he blends his restless Russian chorals into heroical melodies is breathtaking. I remember I uploaded some not so long ago...



Seconding Prokofiev. I recommend violin concertos nos. 1 & 2, and piano concertos nos. 1, 4, and 5. Emphasis on violin concerto no. 1 and piano concerto no. 4. His symphonies, ballets, etc. are great too.

On the subject of Mahler: personally, I prefer the 7th. The 8th is the only one to be avoided.

I've never been able to get into Rachmaninov or Tchaikovsky beyond both composers' first piano concertos. Maybe I'm biased because three of my favorite composers -- Scriabin, Stravinsky and Prokofiev -- were active at the same time, and from the same country.

edit: Actually, I believe Prokofiev was born in Ukraine. One of the five was.

AttheGates1996

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 30, 2007, 02:29:07 AM
I was going to say Gustav Holst, particularly The Planets but I see someone already covered that. So I'll second it. I've always had a strong attraction to Johann Sebastian Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor. I wouldn't consider it very metal, though good.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 30, 2007, 02:53:32 AM
Actually...

Why bother with Prokofiev? I found him empty, along with many of the other classical pieces suggested.

To prep yourself, pick up some short classical pieces. I suggest ones from the Romantic era, including Brahms, Schumann.

Start with some Beethoven.

Move on to Debussy (everyone has afternoon of a faun), then some Bruckner (#7), maybe some Respighi.

Pick up a later symphony from Mozart.

Then try Brahms #4 and Schumann #1.

Go back to Bruckner; #5.

Taste some Bach.

Listen to the best, forget the rest. Trying to find classical that's like the mainstream music you've been hearing is a stupid quest. You don't want more of the same old shit, unless you're afraid. You want to taste the real difference classical makes.

Get a good conductor, avoid Bernstein and Solti and anyone born in the USA.

Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 30, 2007, 03:09:01 AM
Quote
Actually...


Get a good conductor, avoid Bernstein and Solti and anyone born in the USA.






This is bullshit. Solti's Wagner is intoxicating and ambitious, and Bernstein's Le Sacre is simply the best ever recorded. Every conductor has strong and weak points. Karajan's Le Sacre is horrific, and yet his Beethoven 9 is definitive. Know how to spot the best recordings of each conductor and avoid their failed ones, instead of relying on a "America sucks" compartmentalization.

Oh wait but they're J E W S! OMFGAH AVOID!


Re: Tips for a classical newbie
November 30, 2007, 03:10:28 AM
Quote
Solti's Wagner is intoxicating and ambitious, and Bernstein's Le Sacre is simply the best ever recorded.


I disagree. If you want simplistic renditions of great music, definitely try those conductors.