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The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica

The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
November 30, 2007, 05:17:54 PM
Fade To Bluegrass: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica. 30 sec samples:

http://www.gomusic.ru/album.aspx?id=24598

Hilarious!

Septicemia

Re: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
November 30, 2007, 05:43:36 PM
Here's the album. (MP3 - ran into the link some time ago)

Re: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
November 30, 2007, 06:17:36 PM
Most bluegrass originating after the genre's early years (roughly 1945-1955) is terrible pinko-folkie bullshit.  However, Bill Monroe, Flatt and Scruggs and the Stanley Brothers were all titans of American music.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
November 30, 2007, 07:00:06 PM
Quote
Most bluegrass originating after the genre's early years (roughly 1945-1955) is terrible pinko-folkie bullshit.  However, Bill Monroe, Flatt and Scruggs and the Stanley Brothers were all titans of American music.


+ Doc Watson, Roscoe Holcomb, Clarence Ashley, Tommy Jarrell & Fred Cockerham... lots of great stuff. Living in Kentucky introduced me to some great bluegrass. I've never been able to get into this type of folk music as much as Faheyian folk-raga, though.

Re: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
December 01, 2007, 02:21:00 AM
Quote

+ Doc Watson, Roscoe Holcomb, Clarence Ashley, Tommy Jarrell & Fred Cockerham... lots of great stuff. Living in Kentucky introduced me to some great bluegrass. I've never been able to get into this type of folk music as much as Faheyian folk-raga, though.


Holcomb and Watson are both more in the old time string band tradition though.  There's a pretty distinct difference between the mountain music traditions of Watson (Wilkes Co., NC), Holcomb (east KY), Jean Ritchie (also east KY), Riley Puckett, Gid Tanner (both N. Georgia), Kelly Harrell, the Carter Family (both from SW VA) and the various string bands from the NC mountains (mostly Ashe, Watauga, Mitchell and Avery counties) and bluegrass, which emerged from the foothills regions of Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina.

Old Time is, for the most part, a more authentic tradition with a stronger connection to the English, Celtic and Scandinavian traditions from which it emerged, while bluegrass is definitely a product of recorded music (and was, in essence, the 'country' music response to bebop).

When I get time, I'll put some of this stuff up.  I tried to make a Jean Ritchie album available a few months ago, but the link was disabled within a matter of hours.

AttheGates1996

Re: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
December 02, 2007, 01:45:25 AM
Ha... The bluegrass version of The Four Horsemen doesn't sound that bad at all.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Na1R_2o9haY

Divus_de_Mortuus

Re: The Bluegrass Tribute To Metallica
December 07, 2007, 04:28:15 AM
I have a blue-grass comedy re-recording of the Wall by Pink Floyd.

"Relax, just a little pin prick, they'll be no more MOOOOOOO! but you may feel a little sick..."