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Classical guitar

Classical guitar
January 22, 2008, 02:47:36 AM
http://www.classtab.org/

This'll fuck you up.

Re: Classical guitar
January 22, 2008, 10:33:59 PM

shadowmystic

Re: Classical guitar
January 23, 2008, 01:23:34 AM
This is excellent, after learning modern style guitar this is a good way to challenge your skills and increase your repetoire.  Bach>Yngwie

One thing to remember if you have never learned classical guitar is to make sure that you have a reasonable technique even if this seems harder at first.

I use these fingers for picking

high e - 5
b - 4
g - 3
d - 2
a - thumb
e - thumb

This allows for fairly good dexterity, although I don't take lessons so perhaps someone with a bit more knowledge should confirm the legitamacy of this technique.

Re: Classical guitar
January 23, 2008, 04:27:21 AM
Quote
This is excellent, after learning modern style guitar this is a good way to challenge your skills and increase your repetoire.  Bach>Yngwie

One thing to remember if you have never learned classical guitar is to make sure that you have a reasonable technique even if this seems harder at first.

I use these fingers for picking

high e - 5
b - 4
g - 3
d - 2
a - thumb
e - thumb

This allows for fairly good dexterity, although I don't take lessons so perhaps someone with a bit more knowledge should confirm the legitamacy of this technique.


It's been about 6 years since I did any serious formal study of classical guitar but I can say that the pinky finger of the right hand (what you apparently refer to as '5') is not really used in classical guitar playing. Also, it's a bit misleading to assign the fingers to various strings. For instance, in certain passages it would be useful to use the thumb on the d string (arpeggios starting at the d string for instance), and occasionally on the higher strings. It depends on what you're playing. A good way to improve your right hand technique is to get a transcription of Bach's Bouree in E minor. The right hand and left hand fingerings can get pretty tricky so mastering the piece will improve your technique a lot and make right and left hand fingerings more intuitive. It's good to find a transcription of the piece that has suggestions on finger placement.

Re: Classical guitar
January 23, 2008, 11:23:41 AM
im looking into learning an instrument and i think ill give classical guitar a go. Any tips for a beginner? how should i learn? what guitar to get, etc etc.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Classical guitar
January 23, 2008, 05:12:08 PM
Quote
im looking into learning an instrument and i think ill give classical guitar a go. Any tips for a beginner? how should i learn? what guitar to get, etc etc.


Get a teacher. If you try to teach yourself, you'll fall flat on your face.

Avoid guitars with a cutaway -- it's fine with low-end guitars, but if you plan on advancing enough to warrant buying a more expensive guitar, you're going to need to have the dexterity to access those upper frets.

Takamine make great sub-$1000 nylon string guitars. If you only want to spend about $200, Yamaha makes playable ones.

Re: Classical guitar
January 24, 2008, 06:08:54 AM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=98y0Q7nLGWk

I'am sure the above video has been viewed by most of the members here before but there's no harm in watching it again.

Actually, I put that link just to bring a point across. It seems that an average person with Asian or Oriental descent seem to have more mastery over thier respective instruments ( I know..I know how generalized this sounds ). It may very well be  genetic makeup that leads to this because I've noticed that most Asians seem to be perfectly equipped with slender fingers which gives them a more commanding grip over their instruments.

So, does genetics determine our 'virtuosity' level or does practice indeed make one pefect?

shadowmystic

Re: Classical guitar
January 24, 2008, 07:01:00 AM
If you have a good work ethic and some talent you can become extremely good at an instrument.  Obviously genetic makeup plays a part, but it mostly comes down to how hard you practice.

Re: Classical guitar
January 25, 2008, 03:55:40 AM
Quote
http://youtube.com/watch?v=98y0Q7nLGWk

I'am sure the above video has been viewed by most of the members here before but there's no harm in watching it again.

Actually, I put that link just to bring a point across. It seems that an average person with Asian or Oriental descent seem to have more mastery over thier respective instruments ( I know..I know how generalized this sounds ). It may very well be  genetic makeup that leads to this because I've noticed that most Asians seem to be perfectly equipped with slender fingers which gives them a more commanding grip over their instruments.

So, does genetics determine our 'virtuosity' level or does practice indeed make one pefect?

This attitude is a misconception on something slightly similar.. Asians are very academically-based culturally, their families stress "learning" from books more so than even living life. In this way Asians are often very technically skilled at music, having practiced repetitiously for hours but gaining no true understanding of the music. I've seen this true stereotype in action many times, working at a music store, where an Asain will come in, play a Grade 10 piece like a Chopin etude, will constant unchanging rhythm (something that Chopin doesn't necessarily involve) but minimal expression of dynamics and phrasing.

Re: Classical guitar
January 25, 2008, 05:13:46 PM
I would recommend not using the tablature listed above if you are serious at mastering the classical guitar, simply because if you can't read music, it makes it even harder to read it and this will present problems with more rhythmically demanding pieces.  Also standard notation is better simply because with the guitar you change positions and fingerings around.

About setting certain fingers to strings, this isn't a good idea as all songs are different and some tempos and note/string combinations require abnormal use of switching of fingers, it's not all up and down. Generally most players don't use the pinky/smallest finger because it usually isn't necessary or doesn't provide as good of tone as the others. Just read a lot of sheet music and get used to instantly recognizing the letters (p,i,m,a) and interpreting them to your hand.

In addition to a good teacher and guitar, a tuning fork, foot stool/decent chair, metronome, music stand, and a knowledge of how to use/care for the nails of the right hand.

The most frustrating part of classical guitar compared to metal is that there is a great deal of emphasis on posture, positioning, and form.

Re: Classical guitar
January 25, 2008, 11:13:50 PM
kultron, you seem to provide a very informed opinion on playing classical guitar. I am currently trying to learn the instrument, which gives my right hand a very different experience from the usual At the Gates and Morbid Angel riffs. How would you suggest I position my right hand for playing classical? I've heard there's a specific form for fingerpicking.

Also, I learned some of the Dissection classical guitar pieces by ear. I can try to provide tablature/standard notation if anyone's interested.

Re: Classical guitar
January 25, 2008, 11:28:40 PM
I'm no teacher, I've only been playing classical guitar for 6 years, but I know a few things.

Firstly, you must have a classical guitar. If you don't then you can't properly use the positioning. Your guitar should be inbetween your legs. The trick is to keep your picking fingers as straight as possible, using the muscle at the knuckle to pull the finger and the string. It's kind of hard to visualize, so just pretend your fingers were legs that were totally straight and kicking them in the water. Then you pretty much drag your finger to pluck the string. Your arm should be resting on the guitar, not straining to hold the guitar up. The only muscle moving should be your finger muscles. Is that what you want? It'd be better to consult a better authority on the subject though.

Here is a good site of free classical sheet music PDF's: http://eythorsson.com/en/

Re: Classical guitar
January 28, 2008, 11:57:30 PM
EDIT:I just noticed how big my post was. I suggest clicking the link first. It's probably the most important part of my post, so you don't have to read if you lack an attention span.

About the Asian girl, classical guitar is much easier with big fingers and hands. Well at least that's what my experience so far has led me to believe. That girl must have extremely strong fingers. I also would like to comment about the practicing. In my experience almost all classical musicians are poor musicians. They spend dozens of hours, perhaps more depending on the length/intricacy of the song,
to learn just one song. They just remember the way their fingers move and repeat until it's instinct. But put a new piece of music in front of them, even a basic one, and they'll be horrible. I suspect the same from her.

There's no one standard way to play. Well I suppose there is a "correct" classical guitar technique.  However, This comes from when musicians were all about discipline, strict form, etc. I feel that techniques can and should be modified to suit your needs, although if inexperienced people do it it'll probably stunt their progress. Generally classical guitar players use only upstrokes with the index and middle fingers and downstrokes with the thumb, although the standard technique has changed some recently. Many people use all 4 four fingers, especially when performing arpeggios. They also play with their skin on their finger and not their nails like many people believe. However, there are many styles of playing acoustic guitar. For example, flamenco. It is completely different. Just watch this video of the Malmsteen of classical guitar, Carlos Montoya. This man has mastered all techniques and he demonstrates them all in this one song. You can probably learn more from watching this video than any local teacher. Also notice how he taps the guitar while doing all that. Some parts look weird because he's moving faster than the camera can record/youtube sucks for streaming and keep in mind that he extremely past his prime.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5zweApcVGA

I would also like to comment on the stance of the asian girl. Well I don't think stance is the proper word but i forgot what it's called. She uses an unusual stance. Is that a common stance for easterners. I have seen Indians play sitar and they sit in a similar way.

I know this post is getting long, but there is one more thing I must say. If you're used to playing with a pick and are just starting to play with fingers, you will suck. Hell, you'll probably only be able to play with one finger at a time. But you will get better very fast. Playing with fingers is not very difficult, it's just a weird transition. Usually, if you watch a classical guitarist play and ignore the notes, you will notice that his fingers aren't moving all that fast. I think what most people have trouble with is precision although it probably won't be too big of a problem for experienced electrical guitarists. Also many people use improper picking technique. They don't have teachers or bad teachers and their friends sort of just say,"Keep their fingers straight", so they keep their fingers straight all the way to their knuckles. Although it is usually taught this way, this technique makes playing with the thumb or other fingers simultaneously extremely difficult or impossible. What seems to be becoming the new standard way to play is keep your fingers straight for only the first two joints. Put you fingers perpendicular to the strings rather than at an angle like with the other technique. I suggest learning how to do it both ways. I feel this post is getting far too long and I will post more tips later on. I think I'll do one on left hand technique next.

Dunkelheit

Re: Classical guitar
January 31, 2008, 03:00:22 AM
I want to learn classical guitar technique but apply it to electric bass. Should I just try to get the right hand positioning and fingering right and then transpose some classical guitar tabs?

Re: Classical guitar
February 01, 2008, 03:14:37 AM
Quote
This attitude is a misconception on something slightly similar.. Asians are very academically-based culturally, their families stress "learning" from books more so than even living life. In this way Asians are often very technically skilled at music, having practiced repetitiously for hours but gaining no true understanding of the music. I've seen this true stereotype in action many times, working at a music store, where an Asain will come in, play a Grade 10 piece like a Chopin etude, will constant unchanging rhythm (something that Chopin doesn't necessarily involve) but minimal expression of dynamics and phrasing.


Asians are often seen as very academic because of their written languages (generally speaking) is much closer to mathematical thought then the phonetic languages of the west. Thus they receive a huge head start over those who speak western languages at mathematical studies.

This is meant as an addition to your post rather then an alternate theory since I agree with the contents of it.

Quote
I want to learn classical guitar technique but apply it to electric bass. Should I just try to get the right hand positioning and fingering right and then transpose some classical guitar tabs?


This is generally speaking a bad idea. Because the style of playing bass (only finger picking) is a sort of bastardized form of classical guitar playing to suite the bass better then classical guitar theory does.